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BroadwayHD celebrates legendary Fred Astaire with six of his Iconic Musicals for a limited time in November. 

November 1, 2022: Six classic films of legendary Fred Astaire are available to stream on BroadwayHD, for a limited time, this November.  BroadwayHD, the premier streaming service for live theaters brings audiences together to marvel at the numerous talents of Fred Astaire in these six classic musicals. From dancing, singing, and acting, these Oscar-nominated titles showcase Astaire’s versatility and his dynamic relationship with Ginger Rogers. The music will have you hooked in The Gay Divorcee, an Oscar winner for best music and original song. Admire the classy, stylish studio talent of the 1930s era in Shall We Dance and Top Hat and be mesmerized by the wonderful choreography in The Band Wagon. With themes of adventure, love, and mistaken identities, audiences can see it all this November, thanks to the accessibility of BroadwayHD.

“Top Hat”

BroadwayHD celebrates legendary Fred Astaire with six of his Iconic Musicals for a limited time in November. 

November 1, 2022: Six classic films of legendary Fred Astaire are available to stream on BroadwayHD, for a limited time, this November.  BroadwayHD, the premier streaming service for live theaters brings audiences together to marvel at the numerous talents of Fred Astaire in these six classic musicals. From dancing, singing, and acting, these Oscar-nominated titles showcase Astaire’s versatility and his dynamic relationship with Ginger Rogers. The music will have you hooked in The Gay Divorcee, an Oscar winner for best music and original song. Admire the classy, stylish studio talent of the 1930s era in Shall We Dance and Top Hat and be mesmerized by the wonderful choreography in The Band Wagon. With themes of adventure, love, and mistaken identities, audiences can see it all this November, thanks to the accessibility of BroadwayHD.

“The Band Wagon”
  • The Band Wagon – Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse headline this musical comedy about a Hollywood star who returns to the Broadway theater when no producer wants him for a movie. Egos clash between the movie star, his lithe ballerina co-star and their effete director–and the show bombs in out-of-town tryouts. But the initial failure convinces the stars to work together, re-creating the musical to entertain their audience rather than satisfy their own artistic desires … and they produce a Broadway hit.

“Top Hat”
  • Top Hat – With music by Irving Berlin, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers star in this classic musical romance of two lovers kept apart by a case of mistaken identity. Vacationing in London, Dale Tremont (Rogers) is awakened by Jerry Travers (Astaire) working out his new dance routine in the hotel room above hers. Although the two feel an instant attraction, Dale thinks that Jerry is married to her friend Madge (Helen Broderick). When Jerry then pursues Dale romantically, she is shocked–believing him a cad–yet she can’t stop herself from falling in love with a seemingly married man. But when the couple meet again in Venice, all misunderstandings are resolved as Dale and Jerry dance together under the moonlight, cheek to cheek.

Finian’s Rainbow

Finian’s Rainbow – You will believe in leprechauns! Fred Astaire headlines an all-star cast in the big-screen version of one of the greatest musicals ever to come from the Broadway stage–Finian’s Rainbow. Everyone in the world knows that all Americans are millionaires–but only Finian McLonergan (Astaire), of Glocca Morra, Ireland, knows why. By process of mathematics, logic, and moonbeams, Finian deduces that it’s the soil around Fort Knox: Why else would Americans dig the gold out of California to bury it again in Kentucky? All Finian has to do is wait for a full moon, waylay a leprechaun (Tommy Steele), borrow his magical crock of gold and devise a “reason” for his daughter, Sharon (Petula Clark), about why they must travel to Rainbow Valley in the state of “Missitucky.” Finian buries the gold in the magic soil, but there’s an angry leprechaun in pursuit–with dire warnings of misery and destruction. Now, when wishes are made on the leprechaun’s gold, history veers crazily from its path in this tuneful fantasy–proving all Finian’s theories true!

“The Gay Divorcee”

The Gay Divorcee – Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers sing, dance and find romance to the songs of Cole Porter in one of their greatest films–The Gay Divorcee. While crossing the channel after a successful engagement in the cafés of Paris, American dancer Guy Holden (Astaire) is swept into a whirlwind romance when Mimi Glossop’s (Academy Award winner Rogers) garment drops out of the air onto him. Mimi is already engaged, but wishes to break off with her fiancé and has asked a friend Egbert (Edward Everett Horton) for help. Egbert believes he can solve her situation by hiring a gigolo to the fiancé believe Mimi is having an affair. Now, as Mimi and Guy fall in love, she believes she is losing her heart to the paid gigolo. But all secrets are revealed when Guy, Mimi, Egbert, her philandering fiancé and the real gigolo come together in a hotel ballroom–and Mimi is free to marry Guy.

“Shall We Dance”

Shall We Dance – A ballet dancer and a showgirl fake their marriage for publicity purposes before falling in love for real in this delightful musical comedy starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in their seventh film together. Numerous mistaken-identity gags ensue. Among the well-known songs in George and Ira Gershwin’s score are “Slap That Bass,” “They Can’t Take That Away From Me,” “They All Laughed,” and “Let’s Call The Whole Thing Off,” which features Fred and Ginger in a showstopper on roller skates.

“The Barkleys of Broadway”

The Barkleys of Broadway – This is the last film that Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers made together, and their only film together in color. Astaire and Rogers play a pair of married musical comedy stars at the apex of their careers, until an unexpected opportunity threatens to tear them apart. The film features music by George Gerswhin, Harry Warren, and lyrics by Ira Gerswhin.