Broadway Update

Broadway Update: Sweeney Todd, Merrily, Take Me Out, Raisin

By: David Sheward

August 24, 2022: Philip Boroff reports in Broadway Journal that pop superstar Josh Groban and Tony winner Annaleigh Ashford will headline a revival of Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler’s Sweeney Todd, aiming for a Broadway opening next April. Boroff reports that Rent and Hamilton producer Jeffrey Seller is raising $14.5 million for the production which will be directed by Hamilton helmer Thomas Kail and possibly play the Lunt-Fontanne next April in time for the 2023 Tony Awards. No information about the show has been conformed as of yet. (Sidenote: Before he hit the big time, Jeffrey Seller directed me in a Brooklyn community theater production of The Fantasticks. Andrew Lippa, who later wrote the music for the Off-Broadway Wild Party and The Addams Family, was the music director and played El Gallo).

Broadway Update: Sweeney Todd, Merrily, Take Me Out, Raisin

By: David Sheward

August 24, 2022: Philip Boroff reports in Broadway Journal that pop superstar Josh Groban and Tony winner Annaleigh Ashford will headline a revival of Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler’s Sweeney Todd, aiming for a Broadway opening next April. Boroff reports that Rent and Hamilton producer Jeffrey Seller is raising $14.5 million for the production which will be directed by Hamilton helmer Thomas Kail and possibly play the Lunt-Fontanne next April in time for the 2023 Tony Awards. No information about the show has been conformed as of yet. (Sidenote: Before he hit the big time, Jeffrey Seller directed me in a Brooklyn community theater production of The Fantasticks. Andrew Lippa, who later wrote the music for the Off-Broadway Wild Party and The Addams Family, was the music director and played El Gallo).

Josh Groban in Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812.
Credit: Chad Batka

Groban last appeared on Broadway in Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812. (He co-hosted the 2017 Tony Awards with Sara Bareilles) Ashford won a Best Featured Actress in a Play Tony for You Can’t Take It With You and starred opposite Jake Gyllenhaal in Sondheim’s Sunday in the Park with George. On TV, her prominent roles include Masters of Sex, B Positive, and Impeachment: American Crime Story.

Jake Gyllenhaal and Annaleigh Ashford in Sunday in the Park with George.
Credit: Matthew Murphy

Sweeney Todd opened on Broadway in 1979 and ran for 557 performances, winning eight Tony Awards including Best Musical and Actor and Actress for Len Cariou and Angela Lansbury. There have been two previous Broadway revivals–in 1989 (with Bob Gunton and Beth Fowler) and 2005 (with Michael Cerveris and Patti LuPone). A 2017 Off-Broadway production transformed the Barrow Street Theater into a recreation of a Victorian pie shop with audience members seated like customers. (Another side note: Groban was in the audience the night I saw this production.)

This could potentially mean three Sondheim musicals in one season, maybe simultaneously. Into the Woods is playing through Oct. 16 at the St. James, but could extend given its strong box office and Merrily We Roll Along might transfer from its Off-Broadway run at New York Theater Workshop.

Lindsay Mendez, Daniel Radcliffe and Jonathan Groff will headline the latest revival of Merrily We Roll Along.

Casting has been announced for that Merrily revival. Previously announced Daniel Radcliffe will be joined by Jonathan Groff (Spring Awakening) and Tony winner Lindsay Mendez (Carousel). This show begins previews on Nov. 21 with an opening set for Dec. 12 for a run through Jan. 8, 2023.

Take Me Out Returns

The Tony-winning revival of Take Me Out will return to Broadway this fall. The 2002 Richard Greenberg play about a gay baseball player coming out is reopening at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theater on Oct. 27 for a limited run of 14 weeks. Jesse Tyler Ferguson who won a Tony for his performance as Mason Marzac, the gay business manager, and Jesse Williams who was nominated for his role as Darren Lemming, the out gay player, will reprise their roles but the remainder of the cast has not been announced. The Second Stage revival opened at the Hayes Theater on April 4 and ran for 79 performances. Because of extensive nude scenes, audiences were required to secure their phones in locked containers during the performance. Controversy erupted when a nude video of Jesse Williams was shared online.

Tonya Pinkins

Raisin Casting

Tony winner Tonya Pinkins (Jelly’s Last Jam) and Obie winner Francois Battiste (The Good Negro) will headline the Public Theater’s revival of Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun. Pinkins plays Lena Younger, the domineering but loving matriarch of a family struggling with poverty and racism in 1959 Chicago. Battiste is her son Walter who dreams of opening a liquor store with the family’s insurance money. Obie winner and Tony nominee Robert O’Hara (direction of Slave Play, author of Bootycandy, Barbecue) stages the production which begins previews Sept. 27 with an opening set for Oct. 19. A press release states the production will be “innovative.” Should be interesting. Raisin has been revived twice on Broadway–in 2004 and 2014. A 1973 musical version won the Tony for Best Musical.

2022-23 Broadway/Off-Broadway Schedule

Aug. 25–Kinky Boots (Stage 42)

Aug. 28–Two Jews, Talking (Theater at St. Clement’s)

Aug. 30–As You Like It (Delacorte)

Sept. 10–Remember This: The Lesson of Jan Karski (TFANA/Polonsky Shakespeare Center)

Sept. 13–Cheek to Cheek: Irving Berlin in Hollywood (York Theater Company)

Sept. 22–Sesame Street: The Musical (Theater Row)

Sept. 29–american (tele)visions (New York Theatre Workshop)

Oct. 2–Leopoldstadt (Longacre)

Oct. 2–Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge (Public Theater)

Oct. 3–Cost of Living (MTC/Friedman)

Oct. 6–1776 (Roundabout/AA)

Oct. 6–Peerless (Primary Stages/59E59)

Oct. 9–Death of a Salesman (Hudson) 

Oct. 13–The Piano Lesson (Barrymore)

Oct. 19–A Raisin in the Sun (Public Theater)

Oct. 19–The Year of Magical Thinking (Keen Company/location TBA) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Oct. 20–Topdog/Underdog (Golden)

Oct. 26–Straight Line Crazy (The Shed/Griffin)

Oct. 27–Take Me Out (return engagement) (Schoenfeld)

Oct. 30–A Man of No Importance (CSC)

October–Catch as Catch Can (Playwrights Horizons); Downstate (Playwrights Horizons); Only Gold (MCC Theater)

Nov. 2–Where the Mountain Meets the Sea (MTC/City Center Stage I)

Nov. 2–Camp Siegfried (Second Stage/Tony Kiser) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Nov. 3–Almost Famous (Bernard Jacobs)

Nov. 6–You Will Get Sick (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Nov. 9–Where We Belong (Public Theater) 

Nov. 10–Kimberly Akimbo (Booth)

Nov. 15–the bandaged place (Roundabout/Underground)

Nov. 16–Plays for the Plague Year (Public Theater) 

Nov. 17–& Juliet (Sondheim)

Nov. 20–KPOP (Circle in the Square)

Nov. 21–Becky Nurse of Salem (LCT/Mitzi Newhouse)

Nov. 21–Fiddler on the Roof in Yiddish (New World Stages)

Nov. 29–Des Moines (TFANA/Polonsky Shakespeare Center)

Dec. 1–Ain’t No Mo (Belasco)

Dec. 1–Hoagy Carmichael’s Stardust Land (York Theater Company)

Dec. 4–A Beautiful Noise: The Neil Diamond Musical (Broadhurst)

Dec. 8–The Ohio State Murders (James Earl Jones)

Dec. 11–Some Like It Hot (Shubert)

Dec. 12–Merrily We Roll Along (New York Theatre Workshop)

Dec. 19–Between Riverside and Crazy (Second Stage/Hayes)

Dec. 20–The Collaboration (MTC/Freidman)

February–The Trees (Playwrights Horizons)

March 1–the best we could (a family tragedy) (MTC/City Center Stage I)

March 8–Crumbs from the Table of Joy (Keen Company/Theater Row)

March–Regretfully So the Birds Are (Playwrights Horizons)

April 13–Camelot (Lincoln Center/Vivian Beaumont)

April 29–Fuenta Ovejuna (TFANA/Polonsky Shakespeare Center)

May 16–King James (MTC/City Center Stage I)

May–Wet Brain (Playwrights Horizons)

July 9–Orpheus Descending (TFANA/Polonsky Shakespeare Center)

Fall 2022 (no dates yet)

Summer, 1976 (MTC/City Center Stage II)

2022-23 (no dates or theaters yet)

Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death, Black Orpheus, Cinderella, Come Fall in Love–The DDLJ Musical, Dancin’, Pal Joey, Square One

Winter 2022-23

Dark Disabled Stories (Public)

The Wanderers (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Spring 2023 

Prime Facie (a Shubert theater TBA)

The Thanksgiving Play (Second Stage/Hayes)

Good Bones (Public)

Shadow/Land (Public)

Sweeney Todd (Lunt-Fontanne) (possible)

Fall 2023

Poor Yella Rednecks (MTC/City Center Stage II)

2023, 2024 and Beyond

Game of Thrones, The Great Gatsby, Frida, the Musical, High Noon

Future–Good Night, Oscar; The Devil Wears Prada; The Griswolds’ Family Vacation; The Karate Kid; Back to the Future; Our Town; The Nanny; The Normal Heart/The Destiny of Me; Sing Street; Smash; Soul Train; The Who’s Tommy; Working Girl

Lillias White @ Bay Street

Tony Award Winner, Lillias White, brought her new show to Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor for their Musical Mondays series. 

August 12, 2022: The one and only Lillias White brought her new show to Bay Street Theater this past Monday, as part of their ongoing Musical Mondays Series and she was, as always, phenomenal. The renowned Billy Stritch accompanied her on piano.

Tony Award Winner, Lillias White, brought her new show to Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor for their Musical Mondays series. 

August 12, 2022: The one and only Lillias White brought her new show to Bay Street Theater this past Monday, as part of their ongoing Musical Mondays Series and she was, as always, phenomenal. The renowned Billy Stritch accompanied her on piano. 

Billy Stritch

In her show the Tony-Award winner pulled back the curtain to tell humorous, poignant and inspiring stories from her life. Stories she has never told before, onstage or off. The concert interweaved songs that were career milestones, for Lillias, with songs from the soundtrack of her life. She sang songs by Frank Loesser, Stephen Sondheim, Ann Hampton Callaway, Jerry Herman, Cy Coleman and more.

Described by The New York Times as a “one-of-a-kind performer who combines the sass of a classic blues mama with the skill of a Broadway star,” Lillias White is world-renowned for her “glorious” voice and “slightly superhuman” ability to communicate the heart of a song (The New York Times). Her performance in Cy Coleman’s Broadway musical, The Life, won her the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical. 

In addition to receiving Broadway acclaim, Lillias is internationally recognized for her television and film work. Lillias received the Daytime Emmy Award for her role as Lillian Edwards for Outstanding Performer in a Children’s Series on Sesame Street in 1992 and is beloved by audiences around the world for voicing the lead muse Calliope in Disney’s animated feature Hercules. 

She has appeared in cabarets and concert halls around the world, including The Kennedy Center, Carnegie Hall, and the Sydney Opera House. 

Next up at Musical Monday on August 15th is Ali Stroker, the Tony Winner for Best Featured Actress in a Musical, as Ado Annie in the 2019 revival of Oklahoma. She also made history by being the first performer to appear on Broadway in a wheelchair. Her personal motto is “ Turn your limitations into opportunities.”

Photography: Barry Gordin

Lillias White
Lillias White
Lilias White
Billy Stritch
Howard McGillin, Tracy Mitchell
Doug Petri, Bruce T. Sloane
Patrick Christiano, Lillias White
Howard McGillin
Billy Stritch

Broadway Update

Broadway Update: New Woods Cast; Lilias White in Hadestown; Theresa Rebeck Joins Working Girl

By: David Sheward

August 13, 2022: Several new cast members including Tony winners and nominees will be heading Into the Woods. The current cast of the smash hit revival of Stephan Sondheim and James Lapine’s 1987 fairy-tale musical will remain with the show through Sept. 4. Sept 6, real-life married couple Stephanie J. Block (Tony winner for The Cher Show) and Sebastian Arcelus (Elf) will succeed Sara Barielles and Brian D’Arcy James as the Baker’s Wife and the Baker. Additional new cast members are Krysta Rodriguez (Smash, The Addams Family) as Cinderella, Katy Geraghty (Groundhog Day) as Little Red Riding Hood, and Jim Stanek (Fun Home) as the Steward. 

Broadway Update: New Woods Cast; Lilias White in Hadestown; Theresa Rebeck Joins Working Girl

By: David Sheward

August 13, 2022: Several new cast members including Tony winners and nominees will be heading Into the Woods. The current cast of the smash hit revival of Stephan Sondheim and James Lapine’s 1987 fairy-tale musical will remain with the show through Sept. 4. Sept 6, real-life married couple Stephanie J. Block (Tony winner for The Cher Show) and Sebastian Arcelus (Elf) will succeed Sara Barielles and Brian D’Arcy James as the Baker’s Wife and the Baker. Additional new cast members are Krysta Rodriguez (Smash, The Addams Family) as Cinderella, Katy Geraghty (Groundhog Day) as Little Red Riding Hood, and Jim Stanek (Fun Home) as the Steward. 

Andy Karl in On the Twentieth Century.
Credit: Joan Marcus

Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle winner Montego Glover (Memphis) will be playing the Witch on Tuesday through Thursday while Tony winner Patina Miller (Pippin, Sister Act) will continue in the role Friday through Sunday. Drama Desk winner Andy Karl (Groundhog Day, Pretty Woman, Rocky) will briefly take on the dual role of the Wolf and Cinderella’s Prince from Sept. 6-15 and then Tony winner Gavin Creel (Hello, Dolly) returns to howling duties. Joshua Henry remains in his role of Rapunzel’s Prince. On Sept. 27, Ann Harada (Cinderella, 9 to 5, Avenue Q) will succeed Aymee Garcia as Jack’s Mother. Harada played the role during the original New York City Center run of the show. The remainder of the cast including Nancy Opel as Cinderella’s Stepmother, Annie Golden as Cinderella’s Mother/Granny/Giant’s Wife, David Patrick Kelly as the Narrator/Mysterious Man, and Cole Thompson as Jack will remain through the Oct. 16 extension. Will the production go beyond that? We’ll have to wait and see.

Tony winners Andre De Shields and Lillias White.

Speaking of replacements, Tony and Emmy winner Lillias White (The Life, Sesame Street, Black No More) will take over the role of Hermes, originated by Tony winner Andre De Shields in Hadestown on Sept. 13. De Shields won a Tony for the role and is now in rehearsal to star in the revival of Death of a Salesman. T. Oliver Reid plays Hermes until Sept. 4. This is not the first time on Broadway a woman has stepped into a role originated by a man. In 1997, Whoopi Goldberg succeeded Nathan Lane in the revival of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. With the all female and trans revival of 1776 and White taking over in Hadestown, perhaps this will lead the way to more diverse and creative casting. 

Theresa Rebeck

In other news, prolific playwright Theresa Rebeck (Bernhardt/Hamlet, Dead Accounts, Seminar, Mauritius) has been announced as the book-writer for a musical version of Working Girl, the Oscar-nominated 1988 film comedy directed by Mike Nichols about a Staten Island secretary who climbs the corporate ladder. Pop legend Cyndi Lauper (Kinky Boots) is writing the score and Tony winner Christopher Ashley (Come from Away) directs.  The project has been in the works for quite a while. Rebeck replaces Bridget Carpenter who in turn replaced Kim Rosenstock. This is Rebeck’s first stab at musical theater, though she did create and wrote several episodes for the NBC series Smash, which traced the backstage story of a musical based on the life of Marilyn Monroe. (Smash may still come to Broadway as stage show.) Rebeck’s play Mad House recently opened in London with David Harbour and Bill Pullman.

Smash ignited my love of musical theater, and I’ve been eager to find the right musical project since then,” Rebeck said. “I couldn’t have dreamed up a better fit than Working Girl, or better collaborators than Cyndi, Chris and this team.” No word yet on dates, theaters or out-of-town productions for Working Girl.

2022-23 Broadway/Off-Broadway Schedule

Aug. 25–Kinky Boots (Stage 42)

Aug. 28–Two Jews, Talking (Theater at St. Clement’s)

Aug. 30–As You Like It (Delacorte)

Sept. 10–Remember This: The Lesson of Jan Karski (TFANA/Polonsky Shakespeare Center)

Sept. 13: Cheek to Cheek: Irving Berlin in Hollywood (York Theater Company)

Sept. 22–Sesame Street: The Musical (Theater Row)

Sept. 29–american (tele)visions (New York Theatre Workshop)

Oct. 2–Leopoldstadt (Longacre)

Oct. 2–Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge (Public Theater)

Oct. 3–Cost of Living (MTC/Friedman)

Oct. 6–1776 (Roundabout/AA)

Oct. 6–Peerless (Primary Stages/59E59)

Oct. 9–Death of a Salesman (Hudson) 

Oct. 13–The Piano Lesson (Barrymore)

Oct. 19–A Raisin in the Sun (Public Theater)

Oct. 20–Topdog/Underdog (Golden)

Oct. 26–Straight Line Crazy (The Shed/Griffin)

Oct. 30–A Man of No Importance (CSC)

October–Catch as Catch Can (Playwrights Horizons); Downstate (Playwrights Horizons); Only Gold (MCC Theater)

Nov. 2–Where the Mountain Meets the Sea (MTC/City Center Stage I)

Nov. 2–Camp Siegfried (Second Stage/Tony Kiser) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Nov. 3–Almost Famous (Bernard Jacobs)

Nov. 6–You Will Get Sick (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Nov. 9–Where We Belong (Public Theater) 

Nov. 10–Kimberly Akimbo (Booth)

Nov. 15–the bandaged place (Roundabout/Underground)

Nov. 16–Plays for the Plague Year (Public Theater) 

Nov. 17–& Juliet (Sondheim)

Nov. 20–KPOP (Circle in the Square)

Nov. 21–Becky Nurse of Salem (LCT/Mitzi Newhouse)

Nov. 21–Fiddler on the Roof in Yiddish (New World Stages)

Nov. 29–Des Moines (TFANA/Polonsky Shakespeare Center)

Dec. 1–Ain’t No Mo (Belasco)

Dec. 1–Hoagy Carmichael’s Stardust Land (York Theater Company)

Dec. 4–A Beautiful Noise: The Neil Diamond Musical (Broadhurst)

Dec. 8–The Ohio State Murders (James Earl Jones)

Dec. 11–Some Like It Hot (Shubert)

Dec. 11–Merrily We Roll Along (New York Theatre Workshop)

Dec. 19–Between Riverside and Crazy (Second Stage/Hayes)

Dec. 20–The Collaboration (MTC/Freidman)

February–The Trees (Playwrights Horizons)

March–Regretfully So the Birds Are (Playwrights Horizons)

April 13–Camelot (Lincoln Center/Vivian Beaumont)

April 29–Fuenta Ovejuna (TFANA/Polonsky Shakespeare Center)

May–Wet Brain (Playwrights Horizons)

July 9–Orpheus Descending (TFANA/Polonsky Shakespeare Center)

Fall 2022 (no dates yet)

Summer, 1976 (MTC/City Center Stage II)

2022-23 (no dates or theaters yet)

Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death, Black Orpheus, Cinderella, Come Fall in Love–The DDLJ Musical, Dancin’, Pal Joey, Square One

Winter 2022-23

Dark Disabled Stories (Public)

The Wanderers (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Spring 2023 

Prime Facie (a Shubert theater TBA)

The Thanksgiving Play (Second Stage/Hayes)

Good Bones (Public)

Poor Yella Rednecks (MTC/City Center Stage II)

Shadow/Land (Public)

2023, 2024 and Beyond

Game of Thrones, The Great Gatsby, Frida, the Musical, High Noon

Future–Good Night, Oscar; The Devil Wears Prada; The Griswolds’ Family Vacation; The Karate Kid; Back to the Future; Our Town; The Nanny; The Normal Heart/The Destiny of Me; Sing Street; Smash; Soul Train; The Who’s Tommy; Working Girl

Broadway Babe

That’s Entertainment: Broadway Babe, Randie Levine-Miller, has unearthed some terrific YouTube videos with Arthur Schwartz, Chita Rivera, and Joy Behar.

August 22, 2022: Broadway Babe, Randie Levine Miller has some great YouTube finds today including an evening with legendary songwriter Arthur Schwartz, who wrote “That’s Entertainment” among other big songs. And how about Chita Rivera in “Anything Goes?” There’s a terrific documentary about Dionne Warwick. And let the laughs begin with Joy Behar and Susie Essman in conversation at the 92Y.

That’s Entertainment: Broadway Babe, Randie Levine-Miller, has unearthed some terrific YouTube videos with Arthur Schwartz, Chita Rivera, and Joy Behar.

August 22, 2022: Broadway Babe, Randie Levine Miller has some great YouTube finds today including an evening with legendary songwriter Arthur Schwartz, who wrote “That’s Entertainment” among other big songs. And how about Chita Rivera in “Anything Goes?” There’s a terrific documentary about Dionne Warwick. And let the laughs begin with Joy Behar and Susie Essman in conversation at the 92Y.

The Songwriters: An Evening with Arthur Schwartz

One of my most favorite finds! Probably from the late 1970’s or early 1980’s.This is from the Songwriters Series from the 92nd Street Y ….featuring the songs of prolific and legendary songwriter, Arthur Schwartz, who was originally a lawyer.…He narrates, plays the piano, sings some of his songs, and shares behind the scenes stories… Some superlative singers support him: Nancy Dussault, Judy Kaye and Edward Evanko, singing his songs to a much appreciative audience. When talking about his life and times as a songwriter, he shares that it was a “privilege” collaborating with Howard Dietz.  Some of his most notable songs include: “Dancing In the Dark,” “Alone Together,” “By Myself,” “Something to Remember You By” and “That’s Entertainment”— a truly delicious concert that’s a must see!!


Chita Rivera in ANYTHING GOES

From 2000, 18 musical minutes from Chita Rivera’s star-turn as Reno Sweeney in the Paper Mill Playhouse production of Cole Porter’s “Anything Goes” with Lee Roy Reams, Broadway‘s favorite song and dance man, directing.  These musical moments include: “Anything Goes”, “Friendship”, “I Get a Kick Out of You”.

Co-Starring with Chita: George Dvorsky, Bruce Adler and Patrick Quinn. I’ve heard Chita in much better voice over the years,(even recently) but this musical legend is still so interesting to watch. She was no spring chicken then…Chita’s been working in the theater since 1950 and will turn 90 in January!


Dionne Warwick: “Then Came You”

From 2018, this terrific documentary is about Dionne Warwick’s incredible career, from her early days until now… She, Burt Bacharach and Hal David were a magical musical blend… And of course, they wrote most of her hits. She calls Hal David “a poet”, not just a lyricist…..  This PBS special is a must see for admirers of Dionne Warwick… Some of her friends and colleagues doing commentary on the special, besides Dionne, herself, include: Burt Bacharach, Barry Manilow, Chuck Jackson, Smokey Robinson, Johnny Mathis and Gladys Knight, who along with Warwick, Elton John and Stevie Wonder teamed up for “That’s What Friends Are For” in 1985, to raise funds and awareness of the rising Aids epidemic.


Susie Essman with Joy Behar

From 2009, at the 92nd Street Y, Joy Behar and Susie Essman in conversation… A coupla comediennes sitting around talking and dishing!  They’re best friends, colleagues, and each other’s biggest fans and champions for decades.  They first bonded as stand-up comics years ago.  And now, of course, we know Joy as one of the hosts for the last 25 years of “The View”, and Susie,as one of the stars of “Curb Your Enthusiasm”.

Broadway Update

Broadway Update: Ohio to Play Jones, Devil in Trouble, Linda Lavin, etc.

By: David Sheward

August 9, 2022: The Ohio State Murders by Obie-winning playwright Adrienne Kennedy and starring six-time Tony winner Audra McDonald, will be the first show to play the renamed James Earl Jones Theater (formerly the Cort). This will mark the Broadway debut of 91-year-old Kennedy whose Off-Broadway works have included Funnyhouse of a Negro, June and Jean in Concert, Sleep Deprivation Chamber and A Movie Star Has to Star in Black and White. Previews begin Nov. 11 with an opening set for Dec. 8 for a limited engagement. Tony winner Kenny Leon (A Raisin in the Sun, A Soldier’s Play) will direct. Leon will also be directing Suzan-Lori Parks’ Topdog/Underdog on Broadway this season. McDonald and Leon previously collaborated on a digital reading of Ohio State for Broadway’s Best Shows Spotlight on Plays series. McDonald will play Suzanne Alexander, a writer invited to speak at her alma mater about the violence in her work and a mystery unravels.

Broadway Update: Ohio to Play Jones, Devil in Trouble, Linda Lavin, etc.

By: David Sheward

August 9, 2022: The Ohio State Murders by Obie-winning playwright Adrienne Kennedy and starring six-time Tony winner Audra McDonald, will be the first show to play the renamed James Earl Jones Theater (formerly the Cort). This will mark the Broadway debut of 91-year-old Kennedy whose Off-Broadway works have included Funnyhouse of a Negro, June and Jean in Concert, Sleep Deprivation Chamber and A Movie Star Has to Star in Black and White. Previews begin Nov. 11 with an opening set for Dec. 8 for a limited engagement. Tony winner Kenny Leon (A Raisin in the Sun, A Soldier’s Play) will direct. Leon will also be directing Suzan-Lori Parks’ Topdog/Underdog on Broadway this season. McDonald and Leon previously collaborated on a digital reading of Ohio State for Broadway’s Best Shows Spotlight on Plays series. McDonald will play Suzanne Alexander, a writer invited to speak at her alma mater about the violence in her work and a mystery unravels.

“I am so thrilled. It’s only taken me 65 years to make it to Broadway!” said Kennedy.

“I’m honored and humbled to be part of Adrienne Kennedy’s long-overdue Broadway debut in the newly dedicated James Earl Jones Theatre with Kenny Leon,” said McDonald. “This timeless play has a powerful resonance and relevance today, and we can’t wait to share it with the world.”

The cast of The Devil Wears Prada in Chicago.
Credit: Joan Marcus

Chicago ‘Devil’ Out of Fashion

The Chicago pre-Broadway run of the musical version of The Devil Wears Prada, just opened at the Nederlander Theater in the Windy City, has received decidedly mixed notices from the critics. Alexis Soloski of the New York Times called it “a show that has tried on everything in its closet. Nothing fits.” Chris Jones of the Chicago Tribune continued the fashion metaphors, stating in the headline the production was “Not Ready for Its Runway Spotlight.” Johnny Oleksinski of the New York Post bluntly labelled it a “haute mess.” Catey Sullivan of the Chicago Sun-Times found it “more J.C. Penny clearance catalogue than couture” and “a poor knock-off, a cheap flea market bag with a designer label glue-gunned to the lining. Back to the sketchbook!” The show based on the 2006 film and roman a clef by Lauren Weisberger about her year working at Vogue magazine for the exacting editor Anna Wintour, features music by pop-rock legend Elton John, lyrics by Shaina Taub (Suffs, the musical As You Like It now at the Delacorte) and a book by Kate Wetherhead. Tony winner Anna D. Shapiro (August: Osage County) directs. There were never any firm plans for a Broadway opening and it looks the show needs work before it’s ready for the New York runway.

Linda Lavin on the CBS series B Positive.
Credit: Warner Brothers

Linda Lavin in ‘You Will Get Sick’

Tony-Drama Desk-Obie winner Linda Lavin will return to the New York stage in You Will Get Sick, a new play by Noah Diaz beginning previews Oct. 14 at Roundabout Theater Company’s Laura Pels Theater with an opening set for Nov. 6. The play focuses on a young man hiring an older woman to tell his family and friends about his life-changing diagnosis. Lavin won a Tony for Neil Simon’s Broadway Bound and was nominated for The Last of the Red Hot Lovers, The Diary of Anne Frank, The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife, Collected Stories and The Lyons. She won Obies for Death-Defying Acts and the Off-Broadway run of The Lyons and Drama Desk Awards for Little Murders, Broadway Bound and The New Century. She is probably best known for playing the title role on the long-running sitcom Alice (1976-85) and most recently starred on TV in CBS’ B Positive.

Stephen McKinley Henderson,  Ray Anthony Thomas and  Victor Almanzar in Between Riverside and Crazy  at Atlantic Theater Company in 2014.
Credit: Kevin Thomas Garcia

‘Riverside,’ ‘Merrily’ Set Dates, Cast for ‘No Importance’

Between Riverside and Crazy, the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by Stephen Adly Guirgis, has confirmed dates for its Broadway run at Second Stage’s Hayes Theater–Previews Nov. 30 and opens Dec. 19. The play has had a circuitous route to the Main Stem with Off-Broadway engagements at the Atlantic Theater Company in 2014 and then Second Stage in 2015 before winning the Pulitzer. The plot focuses on an ex-cop and his recently paroled son struggling to maintain their rent-controlled apartment.

New York Theater Workshop’s revival of Stephen Sondheim and George Furth’s Merrily We Roll Along starring Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter films, How to Succeed, Equus) has also set dates: previews Nov. 21, opens Dec. 11 for a limited run through Jan. 21, 2023.

Additional cast members for CSC’s revival of A Man of No Importance (joining previously announced Jim Parsons) include Emmy winner and Tony nominee Mare Winningham (Girl from the North Country, Casa Valentina), William Youmans (To Kill a Mockingbird, Big River), Obie winner Alma Cuervo (Uncommon Women and Others, On Your Feet), Tony nominee Mary Beth Piel (The King and I, Anastasia, Netflix’s Halston), Kara Mikula (The Cradle Will Rock), Lortel nominee Thom Sesma (Letters of Suresh, Pacific Overtures), Tony nominee A.J. Shively (Paradise Square), Nathaniel Stampley (Paradise Square), Jessica Tyler Wright (Allegro), and Joel Waggoner (School of Rock). Previews Oct. 11, opens Oct. 30.

2022-23 Broadway/Off-Broadway Schedule

Aug. 11–That Day in Amsterdam (59E59)

Aug. 25–Kinky Boots (Stage 42)

Aug. 28–Two Jews, Talking (Theater at St. Clement’s)

Aug. 30–As You Like It (Delacorte)

Sept. 22–Sesame Street: The Musical (Theater Row)

Sept. 24–Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 27–A Raisin in the Sun (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 29–american (tele)visions (New York Theatre Workshop)

Oct. 2–Leopoldstadt (Longacre)

Oct. 3–Cost of Living (MTC/Friedman)

Oct. 6–1776 (Roundabout/AA)

Oct. 6–Peerless (Primary Stages/59E59)

Oct. 9–Death of a Salesman (Hudson) 

Oct. 13–The Piano Lesson (Barrymore)

Oct. 20–Topdog/Underdog (Golden)

Oct. 26–Straight Line Crazy (The Shed/Griffin)

Oct. 28–Where We Belong (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Oct. 30–A Man of No Importance (CSC)

October–Catch as Catch Can (Playwrights Horizons); Downstate (Playwrights Horizons); Only Gold (MCC Theater)

Nov. 2–Where the Mountain Meets the Sea (MTC/City Center Stage I)

Nov. 2–Camp Siegfried (Second Stage/Tony Kiser) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Nov. 3–Almost Famous (Bernard Jacobs)

Nov. 4–Plays for the Plague Year (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Nov. 6–You Will Get Sick (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Nov. 10–Kimberly Akimbo (Booth)

Nov. 13–Fiddler on the Roof (New World Stages)

Nov. 15–the bandaged place (Roundabout/Underground)

Nov. 17–& Juliet (Sondheim)

Nov. 20–KPOP (Circle in the Square)

Nov. 21–Becky Nurse of Salem (LCT/Mitzi Newhouse)

Dec. 1–Ain’t No Mo (Belasco)

Dec. 4–A Beautiful Noise: The Neil Diamond Musical (Broadhurst)

Dec. 8–The Ohio State Murders (James Earl Jones)

Dec. 11–Some Like It Hot (Shubert)

Dec. 11–Merrily We Roll Along (New York Theatre Workshop)

Dec. 19–Between Riverside and Crazy (Second Stage/Hayes)

Dec. 20–The Collaboration (MTC/Freidman)

February–The Trees (Playwrights Horizons)

March–Regretfully So the Birds Are (Playwrights Horizons)

April 13–Camelot (Lincoln Center/Vivian Beaumont)

May–Wet Brain (Playwrights Horizons)

Fall 2022 (no dates yet)

Summer, 1976 (MTC/City Center Stage II)

2022-23 (no dates or theaters yet)

Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death, Black Orpheus, Cinderella, Come Fall in Love–The DDLJ Musical, Dancin’, Pal Joey, Square One

Winter 2022-23

Dark Disabled Stories (Public)

The Wanderers (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Spring 2023 

Prime Facie (a Shubert theater TBA)

The Thanksgiving Play (Second Stage/Hayes)

Good Bones (Public)

Poor Yella Rednecks (MTC/City Center Stage II)

Shadow/Land (Public)

2023, 2024 and Beyond

Game of Thrones, The Great Gatsby, Frida, the Musical, High Noon

Future–Good Night, Oscar; The Devil Wears Prada; The Griswolds’ Family Vacation; The Karate Kid; Back to the Future; Our Town; The Nanny; The Normal Heart/The Destiny of Me; Sing Street; Smash; Soul Train; The Who’s Tommy

Oresteia ***

By: David Sheward

August 1. 2022: There are some stunning images and moving moments in Robert Icke’s massive modern adaptation of Aeschylus’ Oresteia, paying in repertory with Hamlet at the Park Avenue Armory. But this nearly four-hour marathon indulges in too much extraneous dialogue and lacks the relentless, gripping action of the companion Shakespearean production. 

By: David Sheward

August 1. 2022: There are some stunning images and moving moments in Robert Icke’s massive modern adaptation of Aeschylus’ Oresteia, paying in repertory with Hamlet at the Park Avenue Armory. But this nearly four-hour marathon indulges in too much extraneous dialogue and lacks the relentless, gripping action of the companion Shakespearean production. 

This is a stunning undertaking and there is much to be admired here. The staging is rapid and kinetic, but unlike Icke’s psychologically deep Hamlet, the connection with the material is cool and academic rather than visceral. 

Hara Yannas, Angus Wright, Wesley Holloway, Anastasia Hille and Alexis Rae Forlenza.

In addition, Icke’s adaption of the ancient Greek trilogy depicting the endless cycle of slaughter in the House of Atreus, can be somewhat muddled in spots. For those who did not take History of Theater 101, the plays follow a series of murders in the family of Agamemnon, a leader of the Greeks as they prepare for war with the Trojans. Agamemnon sacrifices his young daughter Iphigenia in return for the gods to send strong winds for his navy to defeat Troy. Subsequently, his wife Klytemnestra slaughters her husband after he returns from the war. For good measure, she also bumps off Cassandra, the Trojan princess Agamemnon has brought home as a trophy. Then Klytemnestra’s children Electra and Orestes do away with mom. Orestes does the actual slaughter, egged on by sis. In the end, Orestes must face the judgement of the Furies for his crime.  

As with Hamlet, Hildegard Bechtler’s sleek set and costumes and Tim Reid’s crystal-clear video design place us in modern times but the characters still depend on ambiguous omens from the gods to craft policy and conduct their lives—and deaths. At first, the engine driving the plot seems to be the traumatized Orestes (an arresting Luke Treadaway) unburdening himself of the entire sordid mess to a therapist (compassionate Kirsty Rider). But projected supertitles documenting messages and weapons as “Exhibits” and time stamps with the exact moment each of the several victims’ expiration, suggest we are in a CSI-type mini-series. There’s also the prophet-oracle Calchas (appropriately spooky Michael Abubakar) making announcements before each intermission for the audience to “be upstanding” as if we were in a British courtroom. Plus it’s not clear if Electra is real or a figment of Orestes’ imagination. Very confusing.

Angus Wright and Elyana Faith Randol.

In another parallel with Icke’s Hamlet, the author-director brings in several themes appropriate for a contemporary setting. These include the public good versus the individual, the role of religion in public life, and how politics can destroy a family.

He also introduces the theme of feminism as Klytemnestra (the stunning Anastasia Hille in a fiery performance) defends her actions with the justification of a mother and a woman protecting her children. There’s also a particularly affecting moment when the enraged Klytemnestra confronts Agamemnon (complex and fascinating Angus Wright) on his devotion to the gods over his family. “Why don’t you just call the gods what they really are? Power and money,” she bluntly states. But too often these ideas are drowned in a sea of words or, to mix metaphors, Icke hits us over the head with them. Towards the end, an offstage voice of authority, about to pass judgement on Orestes, intones “This house is all of us.” Kinda obvious. 

Angus Wright and Tia Bannon Oresteia.

Despite the blurry messaging and over talkative scenes, Icke does deliver a stunning series of stage pictures and sequences. Iphigenia’s death is presented like a modern assisted suicide in starkly clinical detail with a nurse present, and forms requiring signatures before a fatal dose of poison is administered. It’s shocking in its matter-of-factness. Then as soon as the child passes, a blast of cyclonic wind demolishes the quiet and scatters dozens of photographs of soldiers whose lives will be impacted by the coming war. (Several of these pictures blew into the audience and could be examined during intermission.) In another memorable milieu employing breathtaking juxtaposition, the innocent little girl Iphigenia (beautifully played by Elyana Faith Randolph at the performance attended) sweetly sings the Beach Boys’ peppy “God Only Knows” just before she is led to her death. Tom Gibbons’ eerie sound design and Natasha Chivers’ haunting lighting add to the atmosphere of doom and dread.

Anastasia Hille and Luke Treadawa.

Fortunately, the acting is on par with the stellar heights reached by the Hamlet company. Not surprising since many of the actors such as Wright, Rider, Treadaway, and Abubakar are in both shows. There’s also Hara Yannas’ shattered Cassandra, Tia Bannon’s jittery Electra, and Peter Wight’s coldly conflicted Menelaus. This Oresteia is an intriguing enigma, but there’s too much going on for it to be as completely absorbing and revelatory as its sister Shakespearean offering.

July 26—Aug. 13. Park Avenue Armory and Almeida Theater at Wade Thompson Drill Hall, Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., NYC. Schedule varies (runs in repertory with Hamlet). Running time: three hours and 40 mins, including two intermissions and one pause. $45-$199. www.armoryonpark.org. Photography: Joan Marcus

Anastasia Hille
Angus Wright

The Kite Runner ****

By: Paulanne Simmons

July 31, 2022: Turning a much beloved novel into a stage play is always tricky business. It’s especially difficult when that novel spans several decades and two continents. So adapter Matthew Spangler and director Giles Croft should be given special credit for The Kite Runner, which opened at the Helen Hayes Theater on July 21.

By: Paulanne Simmons

July 31, 2022: Turning a much beloved novel into a stage play is always tricky business. It’s especially difficult when that novel spans several decades and two continents. So adapter Matthew Spangler and director Giles Croft should be given special credit for The Kite Runner, which opened at the Helen Hayes Theater on July 21.

Clearly, Spangler was determined to include as much of the Khaled Hosseini’s best-selling novel as possible in his staged version. To do this he makes use of a narrator who tells the story as a flashback/memory and fills in the necessary information between scenes, using much of the poetic language of the novel. 

Beejan Land, Amir Arison and Evan Zes.

The narrator is also the principal character, Amir, a privileged Pashtun Afghan, whose life changed twelve years before the play begins, when he betrayed his servant and best friend, Hassan, by not saving him from an unspeakable attack by the town bully, Assef (Amir Malaklou). And Amir Arison, who plays the role does yeoman’s work, if only because he is onstage for the entirety of the show.

If Arison does not always make the transitions smoothly, he certainly does a creditable job. He is backed by an excellent cast, but the real standout is Hassan Eric Sirakian, who plays the devoted Hassan, a member of the oppressed Hazara, and thus inherently not Amir’s equal. In fact, even though this is clearly Amir’s story, in this tale of love, betrayal and redemption, Hassan is the true emotional center.

Faran Tahir, Beejan Land, Amir Arison, Danish Farooqui, Azita Ghanizada, Amir Malaklou, and Houshang Touzie.

The Kiter Runner follows Amir’s life from his well-heeled boyhood in Kabul to his exile in America with his father, Baba (Faran Tahir), his marriage to Soraya (Azita Ghanizada) and finally his return to Afghanistan, where he needs to take care of unfinished business and assuage his guilt. Without revealing too much of the plot, this involves the fate of Hassan’s orphaned son, Sohrab (also Sirakian).

The play is enriched by music, dance and many details of Amir’s life in Afghanistan as well as the United States. The central metaphor of kites (Amir and Hassan compete in traditional and cut-throat kite races) is echoed in the kites that fly through the air, waving from poles carried by the actors. And Barney George’s set design relies effectively on William Simpson’s projections of Kabul, kites and the West Coast.

Amir Arison and Eric Sirakian.

But The Kite Runner is a long play, clocking in at two and a half hours. It might have been helped with careful cutting. The question is what to leave out.

The Kite Runner runs through October 30 at the Helen Hayes Theater, 240 W 44th St. Mon 7pm; Wed 2pm & 8pm; Thu 7pm; Fri 8pm; Sat 2pm & 8pm; Sun 3pm. Running time: two hours and 30 mins. including intermission. $69—$199. www.telecharge.com. Photography: Joan Marcus

Dariush Kashani and Amir Arison.

Broadway Update

Broadway Update: Woods Extends, Piano Moves, Etc.

By: David Sheward

July 29, 2022: Into the Woods is now officially extending its limited run at the St. James through Oct. 16. The acclaimed revival of the Stephen Sondheim-James Lapine fairy-tale musical was originally intended to play only till Aug. 21 after its sold-out City Center run. The announcement came one day after producers of The Piano Lesson revealed they were moving the August Wilson production to the Barrymore rather than the previously announced St. James. New casting for later in the Woods run will be announced in the coming days. What’s surprising is the extension is only for another two months. Perhaps there will be another extension if the box office continues to hold strong. Woods pulled in a whopping near $2 million last week. Maybe the show could become like another Encores transfer, Chicago which is still running and holds the record as the longest-playing American musical in Broadway history. Chicago boosted its epic run with some interesting big names in replacement casting including most recently Pamela Anderson. With so many juicy roles, Woods could become star-bait and attract new audiences with each new cast.

Broadway Update: Woods Extends, Piano Moves, Etc.

By: David Sheward

July 29, 2022: Into the Woods is now officially extending its limited run at the St. James through Oct. 16. The acclaimed revival of the Stephen Sondheim-James Lapine fairy-tale musical was originally intended to play only till Aug. 21 after its sold-out City Center run. The announcement came one day after producers of The Piano Lesson revealed they were moving the August Wilson production to the Barrymore rather than the previously announced St. James. New casting for later in the Woods run will be announced in the coming days. What’s surprising is the extension is only for another two months. Perhaps there will be another extension if the box office continues to hold strong. Woods pulled in a whopping near $2 million last week. Maybe the show could become like another Encores transfer, Chicago which is still running and holds the record as the longest-playing American musical in Broadway history. Chicago boosted its epic run with some interesting big names in replacement casting including most recently Pamela Anderson. With so many juicy roles, Woods could become star-bait and attract new audiences with each new cast.

Meanwhile, The Piano Lesson, August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winner will begin preview performances at the Barrymore on Sept. 19 with no opening date announced as of yet.

LaTanya Richardson Jackson will be making her Broadway directorial debut and is the first woman to stage a Wilson play on Broadway. She will be directing her husband Samuel L. Jackson as well as John David Washington and Danielle Brooks. The Barrymore is the site of her Tony-nominated performance as Lena Younger in the 2014 revival of A Raisin in the Sun (opposite Denzel Washington, John David’s father.) She also acted in a Broadway revival of Wilson’s Joe Turner’s Come and Gone. In another example of such theatrical serendipity, the Barrymore was the home for original productions of both Raisin (1959) and Joe Turner (1988).

Denzel Washington and LaTanya Richardson Jackson in A Raisin in the Sun at the Barrymore. Credit: Brigitte Lacombe

Bye, Bye, Mockingbird

While Woods is extending, To Kill a Mockingbird will not be flying back to Broadway. According to emails obtained by the New York Times, the stage version of Harper Lee’s beloved classic will not be reopening on Broadway. The play closed in March 2020 along withe the rest of Broadway, due to the COVID pandemic. It returned Oct. 2021 and played the Shubert until Jan. 16, 2022. It was announced Mockingbird would fly to the Belasco in June, but the slot was taken by Girl from the North Country for a limited run and then by Ain’t No Mo for the fall. Rumors had it the show would take up residence at the Music Box in November, but producer Scott Rudin who had stepped away from the production due to reports of creating a toxic work environment, re-inserted himself and pulled the plug. Rudin stated in emails to director Barlett Sher and playwright Aaron Sorkin that the economic prospects for straight plays did not look good enough for a remounting. Mockingbird continues to tour with Richard Thomas and recently opened in London.

Jeff Daniels in To Kill a Mockingbird. Credit: Julieta Cervantes

Cost of Living Dates and Casting

In other Broadway news, another Pulitzer Prize winning play has announced dates and further casting. Martyna Majok’s Cost of Living will begin previews on Sept. 12 at the Samuel J. Friedman Theater as part of Manhattan Theater Club’s 2022-23 Broadway season with an Oct. 2 opening date (October is beginning to look pretty crowded with five B’way openings and probably a sixth with Piano Lesson.) Tony nominee Kara Young (Clyde’s) and David Zayas (Dexter on Showtime) will join Gregg Mozgala (just completed Richard III in Central Park) and Katy Sullivan from the original 2017 Off-Broadway production. 

Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly in High Noon.

High Noon and Frida

There has also been news of new shows on the far Broadway horizon including a stage adaptation of High Noon, the classic 1952 Western starring Gary Cooper as principled marshall defending his town against a gang of outlaws even though everyone else has deserted him including his new bride. The play will take place in real time over two hours as the lonely hero awaits the arrival of the villains on the noon train. The script is by six-time Oscar nominee Eric Roth who won the Adapted Screenplay Award for Forrest Gump. Michael Arden (Once Upon This Island, Spring Awakening) will direct and the plans are for a 2023 opening. The original film, produced by Stanley Kramer and directed by Fred Zinnemann starred Cooper, Grace Kelly, Lloyd Bridges, Thomas Mitchell, Katy Jurado and Lee Van Cleef. Carl Foreman, a victim of the Hollywood Blacklist, wrote the screenplay. The original 1952 film is regarded as one of the classic westerns and was registered with the National Film Registry in 1989 for being “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.” 

Ricardo Herrera and Catalina Cuervo in Frida, the Opera at Michigan State Opera.

Then in 2024, a new musical based in the life of revolutionary painter Frida Kahlo is scheduled for Broadway after regional workshops in 2023. Frida, the Musical, is sanctioned by the Kahlo estate and is based in part on the book Intimate Frida, by the artist’s niece Isolda P. Kahlo. Mexican composer Jaime Lozano is responsible for the music and playwright Neena Beber will pen the lyrics. Julie Taymor directed a 2004 film bio of Kahlo starring Salma Hayek which won two Academy Awards and six nominations. Frida, an opera based on Kahlo’s life, debuted in 1991 and later played the Brooklyn Academy of Music. 

A synopsis of the new production reads, “Grounded by the rollercoaster romance between the artist and her great love, Diego Rivera, Frida will be a full-throated celebration of Kahlo’s joyous spirit of creativity and her unmatched gift for transforming physical and emotional pain into breathtaking beauty.”

2022-23 Broadway/Off-Broadway Schedule

Aug. 25–Kinky Boots (Stage 42)

Aug. 28–Two Jews, Talking (Theater at St. Clement’s)

Aug. 30–As You Like It (Delacorte)

Sept. 19–The Piano Lesson (Barrymore) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 22–Sesame Street: The Musical (Theater Row)

Sept. 24–Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 27–A Raisin in the Sun (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Oct. 2–Leopoldstadt (Longacre)

Oct. 3–Cost of Living (MTC/Friedman)

Oct. 6–1776 (Roundabout/AA)

Oct. 9–Death of a Salesman (Hudson) 

Oct. 20–Topdog/Underdog (Golden)

Oct. 26–Straight Line Crazy (The Shed/Griffin)

Oct. 28–Where We Belong (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Oct. 30–A Man of No Importance (CSC)

October–Catch as Catch Can (Playwrights Horizons); Downstate (Playwrights Horizons)

Nov. 2–Where the Mountain Meets the Sea (MTC/City Center Stage I)

Nov. 3–Almost Famous (Bernard Jacobs)

Nov. 4–Plays for the Plague Year (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Nov. 10–Kimberly Akimbo (Booth)

Nov. 13–Fiddler on the Roof (New World Stages)

Nov. 17–& Juliet (Sondheim)

Nov. 20–KPOP (Circle in the Square)

Nov. 21–Becky Nurse of Salem (LCT/Mitzi Newhouse)

Dec. 1–Ain’t No Mo (Belasco)

Dec. 4–A Beautiful Noise: The Neil Diamond Musical (Broadhurst)

Dec. 11–Some Like It Hot (Shubert)

Dec. 20–The Collaboration (MTC/Freidman)

February–The Trees (Playwrights Horizons)

March–Regretfully So the Birds Are (Playwrights Horizons)

April 13–Camelot (Lincoln Center/Vivian Beaumont)

May–Wet Brain (Playwrights Horizons)

Fall 2022 (no dates yet)

Between Riverside and Crazy (Second Stage/Hayes)

the bandaged place (Roundabout/Underground)

Camp Siegfried (Second Stage/Tony Kiser)

Summer, 1976 (MTC/City Center Stage II)

2022-23 (no dates or theaters yet)

Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death, Black Orpheus, Cinderella, Come Fall in Love–The DDLJ Musical, Dancin’, The Ohio State Murders, Pal Joey, Square One

Winter 2022-23

Dark Disabled Stories (Public)

The Wanderers (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Spring 2023 

Prime Facie (a Shubert theater TBA)

The Thanksgiving Play (Second Stage/Hayes)

Good Bones (Public)

Poor Yella Rednecks (MTC/City Center Stage II)

Shadow/Land (Public)

2023, 2024 and Beyond

Game of Thrones, The Great Gatsby, Frida, the Musical, High Noon

Future--Good Night, Oscar; The Devil Wears Prada; The Griswolds’ Family Vacation; The Karate Kid; Back to the Future; Our Town; The Nanny; The Normal Heart/The Destiny of Me; Sing Street; Smash; Soul Train; The Who’s Tommy

Cat On A Hot Tin Roof **

By: Samuel L. Leiter

July 24, 2022: There have been five Broadway revivals, all of them star studded, and one with an all-Black cast, since Tennessee Williams’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Cat on a Hot Tin Roof opened in 1955. While not all were of equally high quality, none missed the litter box like the current version, the first to open Off Broadway (at St. Clement’s Theatre). 

By: Samuel L. Leiter

July 24, 2022: There have been five Broadway revivals, all of them star studded, and one with an all-Black cast, since Tennessee Williams’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Cat on a Hot Tin Roof opened in 1955. While not all were of equally high quality, none missed the litter box like the current version, the first to open Off Broadway (at St. Clement’s Theatre). 

Produced by Ruth Stage and directed by Joe Rosario, this production of Williams’s operatic drama about sexual dysfunction, familial greed, and that old standby mendacity, sets the play in the present day, as signaled by Xandra Smith’s costumes. It also uses the version in which Big Daddy (Christian Jules Le Blanc) reappears in Act 3. (Williams and the play’s first director, Elia Kazan, disagreed about whether Big Daddy should be seen in Act 3; Kazan’s argument that he should prevailed.) A cell phone is briefly seen, but when a phone rings, it’s a landline that Big Mama (Alison Fraser) has to make a special entrance to answer when Brick (Matt de Rogatis) and Big Daddy ignore it. And there are more f-bombs exploding than in your grandma’s Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Tiffan Borelli, Milton Elliott, Christian Jules Le Blanc, Alison Fraser, Sonoya Mizuno, and Matt de Rogatis.

But such mild distractions don’t overcome this sluggish, misconceived production’s problems. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof requires actors at the top of their game to handle Williams’s realistic/poetic dialogue and psychologically complex characters; they must also mine the otherwise depressing relationships for nuggets of dark humor. I heard a gentle chuckle or two over the course of its poorly paced, clumsily staged three hours, but the general impression was bleak, monotonous, and uninspired.

As one might expect, the greatest fault lies in the casting. Sonoya Mizuno, a Japanese-born British actress, originally a ballet dancer, makes her New York debut as Maggie the Cat, the sexually frustrated beauty queen whose husband, Brick, is soaking himself with drink because of guilt regarding his possibly homosexual inclinations. The sylph-like Ms. Mizuno can’t handle the Southern accent, screeches many of her lines (she’s a cat on a you-know-what, after all), and often depends more on feline, dancer-like movements than on histrionic depth to get her points across. 

Matt de Rogatis

Mr. de Rogatis, his athletic body covered in tattoos and his hair cut in an abbreviated mullet, looks more like a thug than the scion of a wealthy Southern family, but he brings a believable sense of anguish to Brick; he just needs a Maggie with whom the audience can identify as someone who might convincingly bring him out of his sexual lassitude. Brick, recently injured in a drunken fall, wears an orthopedic boot—not a cast—on one foot; his constant hobbling about with a cane, falling down several times during arguments, becomes an annoyingly repetitious device, especially as the direction has him always on the move; Mr. de Rogatis handles the business well, but his much abused cane itself deserves a credit in the Playbill, especially for how well it resists the urge to shut Maggie up during her interminable Act 1 ranting. 

Broadway veteran Alison Fraser’s Big Mama, a role typically played by a woman of sizable matriarchal authority, is instead presented as a high-strung, slightly ditzy trophy wife, her big, blonde hair worn in a bouffant, her short, skintight dress showing off a slender, sensual frame suggesting that if there’s a cat to be found in this domicile, it would be of the cougar variety. Ms. Fraser, with her cute, raspy voice, is always an interesting presence, and she does what she can with Big Mama, who has to wait till Act 3 to show her acting claws, but her speech is sometimes muffled; given the occasional distortion of other actors’ dialogue, which those around me confirmed, this may partly be the fault of Ben Levine’s spotty sound design.

Mr. Le Blanc’s Big Daddy, like Ms. Fraser’s Big Mama, is big only in the hair department. Sporting a distractingly impressive mane of white, shoulder-length hair, and a white goatee, he looks more primed to play a Confederate general than Big Daddy Pollitt, the wealthy Mississippi plantation owner suffering from cancer, but willing to believe it’s nothing more than a spastic colon. Unlike the traditional white-suited Big Daddys, this one is garbed in dark blue. Mr. Le Blanc, an actor best known for his soap opera work, roars and rages like an amateur King Lear. Rather than projecting an image of stolid power, despite his feet of clay, he shuffles about awkwardly, perpetually wincing (that damn colon, I guess), and periodically faces forward to deliver his lines as if they’re arias. Mr. Le Blanc isn’t the only one guilty of this, which seems simply another manifestation of Mr. Rosario’s misguided blocking choices. 

Tiffan Borelli and Spencer Scott.

Spencer Scott and Tiffan Borelli, as Gooper and Mae, Big Daddy’s manipulative son and daughter-in-law, who hope he’ll leave his estate to them and not to Brick and Maggie, bring nothing particularly interesting to their roles. Their children, the No-Neck Monsters, are played as two bratty teenage girls (Alexandra Rose and Carly Gold), and, like the actors playing Rev. Tooker (Milton Elliott) and Doc Baugh (Jim Kempner), make little impression; there’s certainly nothing “no-neck” about them. 

Matthew Imhoff’s bed-sitting-room set occupies all of the wide St. Clement’s stage, with a couch at our left, a bar up center, and a bed at our right. Running behind them from one side to the other is an open hallway—there are no walls—beyond which we can see a panoramic sunset. At selected moments we hear pops of unconvincing thunder and see equally phony flashes of lightning illuminating the lowering skies. You can’t count on Steve Wolf’s lighting to enhance the Southern atmospherics.

Alison Fraser and Sonoya Mizuno.

This revival of Williams’s play, considered one of his classics, does nothing for its reputation. For all the efforts to bring it up to date, it comes off as talky, static, old-fashioned, and as steamy as a day in March. Of course, even stars don’t necessarily have the answers, as anyone interested in reading my review of the 2013 Broadway revival (scroll to entry 55) with Scarlett Johansson, Benjamin Walker, Ciaran Hinds, and Debra Monk can see. As I said there of what I considered a botched attempt to create a hothouse atmosphere, “You can’t have a hothouse without heat.”

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
Theatre at St. Clement’s 
423 W. 46th Street, NYC
Through August 14, 2022
Photography: Miles Skalli

Shy

Shy – The Alarmingly Outspoken Memoirs of Mary Rodgers

By: Alix Cohen

July 29, 2022: “Au fond,” as Mary Rodgers might say, she was about as shy as Princess Winifred= NOT. (Once Upon a Mattress) Daughter of musical theater legend Richard Rodgers, the accomplished artist was a musical theater composer and writer of everything from dialogue for Bill Baird marionettes to Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts to hugely popular children’s books (some turned into movies).

Shy – The Alarmingly Outspoken Memoirs of Mary Rodgers

By: Alix Cohen

July 29, 2022: “Au fond,” as Mary Rodgers might say, she was about as shy as Princess Winifred= NOT. (Once Upon a Mattress) Daughter of musical theater legend Richard Rodgers, the accomplished artist was a musical theater composer and writer of everything from dialogue for Bill Baird marionettes to Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts to hugely popular children’s books (some turned into movies).

Mary was quick, wry, mischievous, sexually liberated, romantic, capable, generous, modest, an admitted pill-popper; a wife (twice, once to a gay man); mother (six times); and, eminently the kind of person whose company and friendship you’d value most highly.

1934: Mary and Richard Rodgers. “Where did that nice man go?”

Her tyrannical “Mummy” Dorothy, was “…driven mad by the things I did that she wouldn’t have done the same way,” strict, tasteful, proud, and forbearing of genius/provider, Richard Rodgers as he slept his way through a multitude of actresses, chorines and secretaries. (Mary calls her equally distant Daddy “Dionysian”.) “We love you, but we don’t like you,” she was told when old enough to understand. With the occasion of her first musical, she finally mustered the courage to play a song for the great Rodgers. His response, “Why did you do that in the bridge? I wouldn’t have done that” made her resolve never to play him her music again.

Because Dorothy hated Wesllesley, Mary attended the college. Encountering girls who had “never seen either a musical or a Jew,” she also hated it. While she was there, best friend Stephen Sondheim studied with Milton Babbitt “passing on everything he thought I’d understand. I guess I absorbed some of it.” She unabashedly admits Sondheim was the love of her life. Her friendship with him during childhood deepened as years passed. (They met at “Okie”/Oscar Hammerstein’s house, likely commiserating about similarly strained home lives.) 

A Christmas greeting from Sondheim. The handwritten melody is from “The Two of You”..”Every day I think anew of you/How I love the two of you.”

“I liked gay men. Everyone should marry a gay man at least once. They’re warmer, more accessible, and more emotional,” she says. Mary and Sondheim slept together (sex is implied at least once) and even contemplated marrying. Their bond included his honest critical support and her helpful camp following. It was she to whom he would turn when, writing Company, Sondheim needed experiential thoughts on the nature of marriage. Mary’s first husband Julian B. Beaty, Jr. would be gay, though in the closet when they courted. He fathered much desired children (words on motherhood might be those of Jean Kerr – Please Don’t Eat the Daisies), but was “finicky, controlling, puritanical, elusive- my mother!”

At 18, she had a date with Harold Prince. “I weighed 165 pounds and wore a size 20. (She later became and stayed svelte.) Not only that, but I was wearing a brown wool suit chosen by my mother. I looked like a Fudgsicle.” She and Prince later considered marriage, but mutually agreed to lifelong friendship. Still a virgin just wanting to “START,” she allowed herself to be deflowered by an actor while apprenticing at Westport Playhouse. The author readily moves on to more important things. “It wasn’t twenty minutes before I thought, this is what I love. These are the people I want to spend my life with…imagination, iconoclasm, fearlessness, a gift for fun-and no snobbery.” A good description of Mary herself.

1960: Marshall Barer, Hal Prince and Mary.

Professional opportunity first showed its hand at the Pocono resort (Camp) Tamiment. Taking advantage of an unexpected gap in playhouse scheduling, Mary and Marshall Barer had three weeks to write what became Once Upon a Mattress, based on Hans Christian Andersen’s The Princess and the Pea. The caveat was the musical had to contain big numbers for all nine contract players. Cart before the horse, songs were custom tailored with plot woven through. “Do not seek to know how musical sausage is made,” she reflected. One can almost hear her laugh.

The collaborators were surprised and delighted when Mattress found New York producers. An expanded version played Off then on Broadway. Here she came up against the imperious George Abbott. Mary and Barer wanted the  unknown Carol Burnett to play Princess Winifred. Abbott thought her too attractive. A little trickery convinced the director to accept the actress. After that, Mary was asked to write a number of children’s songs. At 26, divorced with three children, income was paramount.

1959: Mary, with Joe Bova singing and Dean Fuller watching, perform the new Mattress score for George Abbot. “I said I’d direct this show and I will. But I won’t like it.”

An ill-fated musical called The Happy Medium followed. Two among its songs were called “A Little Night Music” and “A Good Thing Going.” The first became the title of a Sondheim musical, the second the title of a song from his Merrily We Roll Along. Mary was fine with it, Barer not so much. Like many of her peers, she began to frequent “Dr. Feelgood” who dispensed “miracle tissue re-generators comprised of amphetamines, vitamins, painkillers, and human placenta.” She’s as candid about drugs as she is about sex. Around then, she met and married Hank Guettel with whom she had several more children. (One is noted musical theater writer Adam Guettel.) We hear about Hank – actor, director, administrator and a good match.

Circa 2003: “Was it a good marriage? The answer, at a week shy of fifty-two years, is yes.” (with Henry Guettel)

The show Hotspot, swallowed whole by Judy Holliday’s usurping everyone else’s songs, was an acknowledged flop. Mary’s single professional collaboration with Sondheim birthed “The Boy From” Tacarembo La Tumbe Del Fuego Santa Malipas Zatatecas La Junta Del Sol Y Cruz. (“crooth”) for a revue called The Mad Show. Musicalized, A Member of the Wedding “fizzled.” Script writing for Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts came her way.

“I didn’t expect to be my father – who could? I never dreamed of equaling Steve. I wasn’t jealous or envious of Adam’s talent as it emerged- how could I be? It was enough, with all of them, to have had a front-row seat…Larry Hart spoiled me for genius, which is why my life ever since has been a joyous talent search. I collect the way some people collect paintings.”

Circa 1972: Mary and Dorothy. “She had an orderly life with no children underfoot; I was basically Mother Hubbard.”

Mary was approached about authoring a children’s book. “Badness was the thing I enjoyed thinking about most as a kid, and even an adult.” She wrote The Rotten Book which set her on a successful, ancillary career path. Freaky Friday, based on Thorne Smith’s Turnabout (switching bodies with humorous results) would spawn two sequels, several films and a television movie. She even agreed to co-author A Word to Wiveswith Dorothy Rodgers, though later embarrassed about expressed opinions. When asked in adulthood what she missed growing up, it was her mother not her father with whom Mary longed for a relationship. She was a director of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Organization, a board member of ASCAP, and served for several years as chairman of the Julliard School where there’s “a water fountain or something” named for her. 

2010: In Quogue, among the Quoglodytes

Along the way, there are a great many recognizable names, a varied career, the loss of a child, husband, and parents, but this is Mary’s story. Fortunately Jesse Green was there for many years to draw her out, organize, footnote, fact check and fully chronicle her death. The book is warm and fun. A grand read.

Shy-The Alarmingly Outspoken Memoirs of Mary Rodgers by Mary Rodgers and Jesse Green
Published by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux
Photos Courtesy of the Rodgers-Beaty-Guettel family.

The Kite Runner ****

By: David Sheward

July 22,2022: Novels don’t always work well on stage, especially when there’s a first-person narrator. Plays rely on action rather than narration (“Show, don’t tell” is the rule of thumb) and contained plots over sprawling stories. Fortunately, Matthew Spangler’s adaptation of The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini’s 2003 best-seller about a young man’s harrowing experiences of growing up in Afghanistan and immigrating to the US after the Russian invasion, is sharply focused, conveying an epic and engaging plot without wandering or diffusing. Now at the Helen Hayes Theatre for a limited run after two seasons in London’s West End, Kite runs, soars and introduces American audiences to a culture rarely, if ever, seen on Broadway. 

By: David Sheward

July 22,2022: Novels don’t always work well on stage, especially when there’s a first-person narrator. Plays rely on action rather than narration (“Show, don’t tell” is the rule of thumb) and contained plots over sprawling stories. Fortunately, Matthew Spangler’s adaptation of The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini’s 2003 best-seller about a young man’s harrowing experiences of growing up in Afghanistan and immigrating to the US after the Russian invasion, is sharply focused, conveying an epic and engaging plot without wandering or diffusing. Now at the Helen Hayes Theatre for a limited run after two seasons in London’s West End, Kite runs, soars and introduces American audiences to a culture rarely, if ever, seen on Broadway. 

Faran Tahir, Beejan Land, Amir Arison, Danish Farooqui, Azita Ghanizada, Amir Malaklou, and Houshang Touzie.

The scenario borders on the sentimental and the contrived, depending a bit too much on coincidence and deep, dark secrets, but these slight flaws do not hamper Hosseini and Spangler’s powerful theme of redemption over guilt and the triumph of basic decency over geopolitical disasters. There is an overriding narrator, Amir (Amir Arison from TV’s Blacklist in an impressive and emotive performance), the son of a wealthy and domineering Afghan businessman. Amir’s relationship with Hassan (heartbreaking Eric Sirakian), the son of the family’s servant, forms the backbone of the play, as class and social barriers force the two boys apart and rupture both lives. The title refers to the sport of kite-flying where the contestants manipulate their aerial toys in attempts to cut rivals’ strings. The runners retrieve the fallen kites to score a victory. Hassan’s talent to fetch the trophies for Amir serves as a metaphor for his loyalty and devotion which Amir later betrays.

We follow Amir to America, as he grows up, marries, achieves success as a writer, and then through a melodramatic twist, returns to his homeland after the Russians have fled and the fanatical Taliban has taken over. Afghanistan’s current chaotic status with the Taliban reasserting its stranglehold following the American withdrawal in 2021 adds to the play’s ironic impact.

Dariush Kashani and Amir Arison.

As mentioned, Arison carries much of the weight of the narrative on his shoulders, never leaving the stage for the show’s entire two and a half hours. He skillfully portrays Amir’s  overwhelming guilt and struggle to make up for his betrayal of Hassan (to explain further would give away too much of the story). In a more conventional plot, the hero would overcome his fear and emerge easily triumphant, but Arison does not cover Amir’s flaws, but displays them with naked frankness. Eric Sirakian pulls at heartstrings unashamedly as the pathetic and noble Hassan. 

There is strong support from Faran Tahir and Houshang Touzie as fierce, unforgiving fathers, Azita Ghanizada as Amir’s loving and independent sweetheart, and Amir Malaklou as a childhood bully who becomes a deadly Taliban official. 

 Evan Zes, Eric Sirakian and Amir Arison.

Giles Croft’s fluid and inventive staging and Charles Balfour’s scene-shifting lighting transport us from Kabul to San Francisco to Pakistan and across decades. Barney George’s multi-purpose environment is effectively transformed into dozens of settings. George’s costumes also establish the various locales and time periods (I especially loved it when the cast leapt out of the wings in 1980s California casual wear to establish Amir’s arrival in the US.)  Williams Simpson’s projection design creates an enchanting atmosphere of a kite-filled sky and Jonathan Girling’s original score played by tabla artist Salar Nader is beautifully lush. All these production elements, along with the high-level acting, combine for a fierce and involving evening in the theater. We are taken to a part of the world few in America probably have experienced, which is what theatre is all about or should be.

July 21—Oct. 30. Helen Hayes Theater, 240 W. 44th St., NYC. Mon 7pm; Wed 2pm & 8pm; Thu 7pm; Fri 8pm; Sat 2pm & 8pm; Sun 3pm. Running time: two hours and 30 mins. including intermission. $69—$199. www.telecharge.com. Photography: Joan Marcus

Beejan Land, Amir Arison and Evan Zes.

Broadway Update

Broadway Update: What’s Up with Into the Woods and Piano Lesson?

By: David Sheward

July 22, 2022: The Encores! revival of Into the Woods is such a big hit that there are rumors it will extend beyond its relatively brief limited run ending Aug. 21 at the St. James. But the revival of August Wilson’s The Piano Lesson starring Samuel L. Jackson, Danielle Brooks and John David Washington is slated to begin previews at the St. James on Sept. 19. Johnny Oleksinski of the New York Post reported last week that Woods producers want their show to stay put and have Piano Lesson move to the Barrymore where Paradise Square has just closed. (Side note: Paradise producer Garth Drabinsky has been placed on Equity’s Do Not Work list for “outstanding payments and benefits, and a continued pattern of abuse and neglect that created an unsafe and toxic work environment.”) There has been no confirmation on Woods extending or Piano Lesson changing its venue. Tickets are not being sold for Woods beyond Aug. 21 and tickets are being sold for Piano Lesson at the St. James from Sept. 19 until Jan. 8, 2023.

Broadway Update: What’s Up with Into the Woods and Piano Lesson?

By: David Sheward

July 22, 2022: The Encores! revival of Into the Woods is such a big hit that there are rumors it will extend beyond its relatively brief limited run ending Aug. 21 at the St. James. But the revival of August Wilson’s The Piano Lesson starring Samuel L. Jackson, Danielle Brooks and John David Washington is slated to begin previews at the St. James on Sept. 19. Johnny Oleksinski of the New York Post reported last week that Woods producers want their show to stay put and have Piano Lesson move to the Barrymore where Paradise Square has just closed. (Side note: Paradise producer Garth Drabinsky has been placed on Equity’s Do Not Work list for “outstanding payments and benefits, and a continued pattern of abuse and neglect that created an unsafe and toxic work environment.”) There has been no confirmation on Woods extending or Piano Lesson changing its venue. Tickets are not being sold for Woods beyond Aug. 21 and tickets are being sold for Piano Lesson at the St. James from Sept. 19 until Jan. 8, 2023.

The St. James has mostly housed musicals including such smash hits as The King and I, The Pajama Game, Hello, Dolly!, Barnum, The Secret Garden, and The Producers. Among the few straight plays the theater has played host to are Luther (1963), Tennessee Williams’ short-lived Vieux Carre (1977), Desire Under the Elms (2009) and Kevin Kline starring in Noel Coward’s Present Laughter (2017). There was also What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, based on Raymond Carver’s short story. But that was only a fictional show, filmed at the St. James as part of the 2014 Oscar-winning Birdman movie starring Michael Keaton.

Meanwhile, Oleksinski mentioned in the Post that a Kander and Ebb revue called New York, New York, produced by Sonia Friedman, is supposed to go into the St. James in the Spring of 2023. Again, no confirmation or mention about this show on the website for Friedman’s production company.

Cheyenne Jackson

Incidentally, Cheyenne Jackson (Finian’s Rainbow, Xanadau) will take over Gavin Creel’s dual Woods roles of the Wolf and Cinderella’s Prince from July 24-Aug. 2 while Creel is in residence at the O’Neill National Musical Theatre Conference starring in the show he wrote Walk on Through: Confessions of a Museum Novice. Jackson played the roles in a Hollywood Bowl summer production of Woods in 2019. Understudy Jason Forbach will take over the double roles from Aug. 3-5. Creel returns on Aug. 6. I saw Forbach covering for Brian d’Arcy James as the Baker.

So if Woods does not extend at the St. James and Piano does move in, that leaves the possibility of ITW just ending its limited run or moving to another theater, possibly the Barrymore, or even the Nederlander where Mr. Saturday Night starring Billy Crystal will close on Sept. 4. Rumor again has it that Sing Street, which played Off-Broadway at the New York Theater Workshop in 2019, might snatch up the Barrymore, but nothing is certain or confirmed. Sing Street, based on the 2016 film about a group of Dublin high-school students forming a rock band, was slated to transfer to Broadway in 2020, but plans were halted by the COVID pandemic. That show is slated to play the Huntington Theater in Boston Aug. 26-Oct. 2.

2022-23 Broadway/Off-Broadway Schedule

July 21–The Kite Runner (Hayes)

Aug. 25–Kinky Boots (Stage 42)

Aug. 30–As You Like It (Delacorte)

Sept. 19–The Piano Lesson (St. James) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 22–Sesame Street: The Musical (Theater Row)

Sept. 24–Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 27–A Raisin in the Sun (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Oct. 2–Leopoldstadt (Longacre)

Oct. 6–1776 (Roundabout/AA)

Oct. 9–Death of a Salesman (Hudson) 

Oct. 20–Topdog/Underdog (Golden)

Oct. 26–Straight Line Crazy (The Shed/Griffin)

Oct. 28–Where We Belong (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Oct. 30–A Man of No Importance (CSC)

October–Catch as Catch Can (Playwrights Horizons); Downstate (Playwrights Horizons)

Nov. 2–Where the Mountain Meets the Sea (MTC/City Center Stage I)

Nov. 3–Almost Famous (Bernard Jacobs)

Nov. 4–Plays for the Plague Year (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Nov. 10–Kimberly Akimbo (Booth)

Nov. 17–& Juliet (Sondheim)

Nov. 20–KPOP (Circle in the Square)

Dec. 1–Ain’t No Mo (Belasco)

Dec. 4–A Beautiful Noise: The Neil Diamond Musical (Broadhurst)

Dec. 11–Some Like It Hot (Shubert)

Dec. 20–The Collaboration (MTC/Freidman)

February–The Trees (Playwrights Horizons)

March–Regretfully So the Birds Are (Playwrights Horizons)

April 13–Camelot (Lincoln Center/Vivian Beaumont)

May–Wet Brain (Playwrights Horizons)

Fall 2022 (no dates yet)

Between Riverside and Crazy (Second Stage/Hayes)

the bandaged place (Roundabout/Underground)

Camp Siegfried (Second Stage/Tony Kiser)

Cost of Living (MTC/Friedman)

Summer, 1976 (MTC/City Center Stage II)

2022-23 (no dates or theaters yet)

Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death, Black Orpheus, Cinderella, Come Fall in Love–The DDLJ Musical, Dancin’, The Ohio State Murders, Pal Joey, Square One

Winter 2022-23

Dark Disabled Stories (Public)

The Wanderers (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Spring 2023 

Prime Facie (a Shubert theater TBA)

The Thanksgiving Play (Second Stage/Hayes)

Good Bones (Public)

Poor Yella Rednecks (MTC/City Center Stage II)

Shadow/Land (Public)

2023 and Beyond

Game of Thrones, The Great Gatsby

Future–Good Night, Oscar; The Devil Wears Prada; The Griswolds’ Family Vacation; The Karate Kid; Back to the Future; Our Town; The Nanny; The Normal Heart/The Destiny of Me; Sing Street; Smash; Soul Train; The Who’s Tommy

Gavin Creel and Julia Lester in “Into the Woods”. Credit: Matthew Murphy and Evan Zimmerman for MurphyMade.

Michael Feinstein @ WHBPAC

August 1, 2022: From Gershwin to Carole King and beyond, Michael Feinstein expands the Great American Songbook into the modern era. Feinstein is a multi-platinum-selling, two-time Emmy and five-time Grammy Award-nominated entertainer dubbed “The Ambassador of the Great American Songbook.” He is widely considered one of the premier interpreters of American standards. This is an evening of music you won’t want to miss!

Generously Sponsored by Dr. Stanley Zinberg
For Tickets Click Here

August 1, 2022: From Gershwin to Carole King and beyond, Michael Feinstein expands the Great American Songbook into the modern era. Feinstein is a multi-platinum-selling, two-time Emmy and five-time Grammy Award-nominated entertainer dubbed “The Ambassador of the Great American Songbook.” He is widely considered one of the premier interpreters of American standards. This is an evening of music you won’t want to miss!

Generously Sponsored by Dr. Stanley Zinberg
For Tickets Click Here