Ashley Griffins’ “Snow”

On Monday April 3rd at 12:30pm, Rachel Klein (Around The World in 80 Days, More Than All The World) / directs a reading of SNOW – a new play by Ashley Griffin (creator of the pop culture phenomenon Forever Deadward) – at PLAYWRIGHTS HORIZONS (416 West 42rd St, between 9th and 10th avenues, South Rehearsal Studio.)

On Monday April 3rd at 12:30pm, Rachel Klein (Around The World in 80 Days, More Than All The World) / directs a reading of SNOW – a new play by Ashley Griffin (creator of the pop culture phenomenon Forever Deadward) – at PLAYWRIGHTS HORIZONS (416 West 42rd St, between 9th and 10th avenues, South Rehearsal Studio.)

SNOW beautifully and movingly deals with the importance and power of stories to address the issues of our society and human experience. Featuring: Gracie Beardsley (How The Grinch Stole Christmas,) Ryan Clardy (One Life To Live,) Christian Coulson (Harry Potter, Mozart in the Jungle,) Ashley Griffin (Hamlet,) Jillian Louis (It Shoulda Been You,) Jennifer Regan (Elementary, Born Yesterday) and Tad Wilson (Bonnie and Clyde, Wonderland) Casting by Daryl Eisenberg Casting. Presented by The Prodjects Kompany and A.N.O.N. Productions in association with Playwrights Horizons.

Exploring the power and importance of storytelling, Snow (a new play written by pop culture phenomenon Forever Deadward creator Ashley Griffin) follows three disparate storylines that all revolve around the fairy tale Snow White.Utilizing a structure similar to Cloud Atlas and The Hours, six actors playing multiple roles tell the stories of the Grimm Brothers (who originally collected and published the classic fairy tales), the Campbells (a Victorian theatrical family whose lives begin to mirror Snow White), and modern day Astrid (a young woman who, after her abusive mother puts her in a coma, must decide whether or not to wake up). Incorporating aspects of American Gods, and classic storytelling techniques a la Peter and the Starcatcher, Snow is a dark and moving play that mines our storytelling traditions both in style and subject matter.

This work contains adult subject matter, including the death of a child, sexual content and drug use. 

 

The Price **** 1/2

By: Isa Goldberg

Having found The Price to be an oddly quotidian play, given that Arthur Miller wrote it, it is an unexpected pleasure to see this revival by The Roundabout Theatre, at the American Airlines Theatre on Broadway. Under Terry Kinney’s insightful direction, this revival is, most importantly, comic, which is a damn good thing when you’re sitting in an attic filled with memories of the 1929 stock market crash. Here we meet the two surviving brothers, Victor, an understated Mark Ruffalo, his wife, an optimistic, albeit disappointed Jessica Hecht, and his brother Walter, Tony Shalhoub. While outgoing and generous, Shalhoub’s Walter, spares no one from his personal sense of justice.

By: Isa Goldberg

Having found The Price to be an oddly quotidian play, given that Arthur Miller wrote it, it is an unexpected pleasure to see this revival by The Roundabout Theatre, at the American Airlines Theatre on Broadway. Under Terry Kinney’s insightful direction, this revival is, most importantly, comic, which is a damn good thing when you’re sitting in an attic filled with memories of the 1929 stock market crash. Here we meet the two surviving brothers, Victor, an understated Mark Ruffalo, his wife, an optimistic, albeit disappointed Jessica Hecht, and his brother Walter, Tony Shalhoub. While outgoing and generous, Shalhoub’s Walter, spares no one from his personal sense of justice.

But the surprise appearance, amidst this spectacular casting, is an octagarian antique dealer, played by Danny DeVito. His Solomon seeks justice only for himself.

While the arguments are obvious, including the fight over the family money; the absence of parental love; and the loss of self that insufferable families demand, the issues drive to the heart of so much of Miller’s oeuvre. Like Death of A Salesman, the equation between success and money presides here, as does the failure, literally the crash, of the American Dream. But there is also something very simple at the heart of the dialogue between these family members about what it takes to be a man. Suddenly that question appears as the riddle that haunts many of Miller’s iconic characters, from John Proctor in The Crucible to Eddie and Rudolfo in A View from a Bridge, not to mention the ostensibly autobiographical play, After The Fall.

Derek McLane’s contemporary set, places us in an attic surrounded by water towers that mirror our city’s innards. But the entertainment is Coliseum-style, with Roman gladiators fighting for their lives. And at the end, DeVito’s laugher ricochets from the proscenium stage like an apparition of some ridiculous destiny.

The Price **** 1/2
Roundabout Theater Company
American Airlines Theatre
227 W. 42nd Street
212-719-1300 or roundabouttheatre.org
2 hours and 30 minutes, with one 15 minute intermission
Photos: Joan Marcus


Sunday In The Park with George **** 1/2

By: Isa Goldberg

Looking haggard and deep in thought, Jake Gyllenhaall makes his Broadway musical debut as George Seurat in this, the second Broadway revival of Stephen Sondheim’s Sunday In The Park with George. Watching this production at a Wednesday matinee, the audience greeted Gyllenhaal with an unprecedented silence – a rare moment of respect for a movie star, while Annaleigh Ashford (Dot), who makes her entrance just moments after his, received thunderous applause. A Broadway legend, in her own day, Ashford delivers a subtle performance – as serious as it is humorous.

By: Isa Goldberg

Looking haggard and deep in thought, Jake Gyllenhaall makes his Broadway musical debut as George Seurat in this, the second Broadway revival of Stephen Sondheim’s Sunday In The Park with George. Watching this production at a Wednesday matinee, the audience greeted Gyllenhaal with an unprecedented silence – a rare moment of respect for a movie star, while Annaleigh Ashford (Dot), who makes her entrance just moments after his, received thunderous applause. A Broadway legend, in her own day, Ashford delivers a subtle performance – as serious as it is humorous.

Gyllenhaal, however, is masterful in his own right. While he is not a singer on par with the likes of Mandy Patinkin, who created the role on Broadway, Gyllenhaal works with an entirely different stage vocabulary. Take The Day Off, a song George sings about painting The Dog in his 1884 masterpiece, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte. “Rolling around in mud and dirt/Begging a bone on Sunday,” are literally portrayed by Gyllennhall, as he transforms into that character, “Roaming around on Sunday/Poking among the roots and rocks.” The rawness of Gyllenhaal’s voice rings true, and he is physically riveting, bringing to mind the bizarre animations in video games. Not an inappropriate comparison, that. After all, Seurat’s edgy work, dismissed for its pointillist style, was also outré in its day.

In fact, Gyllenhaal’s hands appear to have lived holding onto that pointillist’s brush. With them he pokes gracefully, disseminates light, embraces balance, and tells us this enchanting story as it was written, by James Lapine.

In the second act, George (Gyllenhaal) appears again as Seurat’s grandson, creating works he calls “Chromolumes,” a display of “light,” “color,” “harmony,” “balance,” “tension,” and music, much the way that his grandfather had envisioned his own artistic process nearly a century earlier. And Ashford, Seurat’s model and muse becomes the grandmother of young George, embracing her memories of the man who painted her as Dot.

There is an essential nostalgia to the production that is belied by the uniqueness of its style. Indeed, there is no other musical like it, still it stands on the shoulders of all great musicals, as it extols masterpiece, in and of itself. Like George’s Chromolumes, Sondheim’s songs speak about “order, design, opposition, tone, symmetry…” And that is where we enter, watching a blank canvas come to life with endless possibilities.

Helmed by Sarna Lapine, there is genuine daring to her directorial concept, which underplays the romanticism of the musical composition. More prominent here is the ensemble of actors – Brooks Ashmanskas, Phillip Boykin, and Penny Fuller, among them, who emerge “In the middle of the summer/On an island in the river on a Sunday.” It is all simply divine!

Sunday In The Park with George  **** 1/2
Hudson Theater
139 West 44th Street
855 801-5876
Photos: Matthew Murphy

 

Angry Young Man ****

American Premiere of critically acclaimed British comedy opens at Urban Stages

By: Patrick Christiano

Angry Young Man, a satirical comedy by award winning playwright Ben Woolf about Yussef, a surgeon from an unidentified Middle Eastern country who comes to London after a bungled operation in search of work, is an entertaining little gem. When Yussef doesn’t realize how far the airport is to central London, a cab driver cons him out of all of his cash, and he is left stranded in a park talking to the ducks.

American Premiere of critically acclaimed British comedy opens at Urban Stages

By: Patrick Christiano

Angry Young Man, a satirical comedy by award winning playwright Ben Woolf about Yussef, a surgeon from an unidentified Middle Eastern country who comes to London after a bungled operation in search of work, is an entertaining little gem. When Yussef doesn’t realize how far the airport is to central London, a cab driver cons him out of all of his cash, and he is left stranded in a park talking to the ducks.

With no friends or money and a limited command of English his plight couldn’t be bleaker, or could it? Yussef’s madcap adventure becomes decidedly dark when he meets Patrick, a revolutionary who decides to take him on as a project and leads him into London’s underworld, where people, Yussef believes are his friends, continue to screw him.  Jussef has a terrifying encounter with Skinheads and all sorts of mishaps with bizarre characters while being used by Patrick as a prop for his revolution.

A superb cast meticulously helmed by Stephen Hamilton keeps the fast-paced farce moving at a deliciously brisk pace for 75 minutes as madcap indignities are unrelentingly thrust upon Jussef. The gifted ensemble of four includes Christopher Daftsios, Rami Margron, Max Samuels, and Nazli Sarpkaya, two men and two women, intermittently play Yussef and the other misfits he encounters. They seamlessly switch roles and accents with comic panache playing broad physical comedy that never becomes dull under Stephen Hamilton’s clever guidance.

The cast is costumed by Yuka Silvera in identical oversized suits that set a perfect comic tone for Jussef’s awkward struggle of being lost in a foreign land and lost in his own skin as well.

The evening may be an entertaining charade, however there is no hiding the bigotry just beneath the surface underlining the real struggle of immigrants here and everywhere. You may laugh at playwright Ben Woolf’s farce, yet his candy-coated message is no laughing matter.

Angry Young Man opened at Urban Stages, 259 West 30th Street in New York on March 23, 2017. The limited run at Urban Stages is through April 9th and will be followed performances at Guild Hall in East Hampton from May 31 through June 18.

The schedule at Urban Stages, 259 West 30th Street, is Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 7pm, Saturday a 3pm & 7pm and Sunday at 3pm. No evening performance on March 29 and April 5th.  For tickets call 866-811-4111 or at www.urbanstages.org Student Rush tickets are available for $15 (with valid ID, subject to availability).
Click Here for Opening Night Photos by Barry Gordin

Photos: David Rogers

Christopher Daftsios, Max Samuels, Rami Margron, Nazli Sarpkaya

 

 

Joan of Arc: Into The Fire ****1/2

By: Isa Goldberg

With book, music, and lyrics by David Byrne of the Talking Heads, Joan of Arc: Into The Fire, at The Public Theater, is completely sensational. Byrne’s, Here Lies Love, about the life of Imelda Marcos, premiered at The Public a few years ago, also to a euphoric reception. Sensation is Byrne’s coat of arms.

By: Isa Goldberg

With book, music, and lyrics by David Byrne of the Talking Heads, Joan of Arc: Into The Fire, at The Public Theater, is completely sensational. Byrne’s, Here Lies Love, about the life of Imelda Marcos, premiered at The Public a few years ago, also to a euphoric reception. Sensation is Byrne’s coat of arms.

His collaborator, Alex Timbers, who directed the musical about Marcos, brings his brand of radical, fantastical, and in-your-face theater, to this contemporary musical about the allusive Saint Joan. Add to this Stephen Hoggett’s bold choreography, and you know, you’re Into The Fire.

Playing Joan of Arc, Jo Lampert, a performer, and lead singer for the band tUnE-yArDs, is astonishing. Capturing the zeitgeist with gender fluidity. Lampert is the stunning creator of her own being. Her on-stage transformation from a feminine young woman to a warrior in a black motorcycle jacket, dancing with a sword, is an intense kind of psychological surgery. Iggy Pop-thin, tall, and lithe, she delivers an arresting physical performance, while snaring us with a voice that ranges from pure and boyish to piercing and ardent.

Essentially, the show is a sung through rock musical, ranging in style from blasting electronic feedback to the sweetest of ballads, such as “Send her to Heaven,” sung by Joan’s mother (Mare Winningham) twenty four years after her daughter was burned at the stake. With the exception of Joan and her mother, all of the actors on the stage are men, so the production resonates with a powerful masculinity that is brutish at times.

That Joan was canonized more than 500 years after being killed by the country she fought to protect, speaks to the enduring nature of the mythology that surrounds her. That she was fierce, and rejected the gender that inhibited that, is one reason to reclaim her today. That she was a patriotic freedom fighter, who waged war to liberate the villages in her native France, makes her an icon we can look to, in this tough political time. (After all, were it not for the many, many Americans who raised their voices to protect us from the repeal of Obamacare, we would have lost it.) That Joan was martyred by both church and state, to hide their lies is, yet again, a sad contemporary sort of antidote.

This is a stylish production, indeed, with ingenious costumes by Clint Ramos, who has draped the soldiers in cloaks that bear the British flag on one side and the fleur de lys on the other. Men, fighting themselves, is a powerful image here, as are Darrel Maloney’s projections, which open the show, swinging back in time at high speed, from today to the Middle Ages. It happens so quickly, it’s as if nothing has changed.

Joan of Arc: Into The Fire **** 1/2
Public Theatre
425 Lafayette St, NYC.
Tue—Sat, 8:30pm; Sat, Sun, 2:30 pm.
Running time: 95 minutes with no intermission
(212) 967-7555.
www.publictheater.org.
March 15—April 30. Photos: Joan Marcus

Jo Lampert in “Joan of Arc: Into The Fire”

 

The Strangest **

By: Paulanne Simmons

In Albert Camus’ 1942 novel, The Stranger, a French Algerian named Merusault kills an Arab the day after attending his mother’s funeral, where he shows no emotion. Merusault is sentenced to death, in great part because the prosecutor, using the evidence of his Mersault’s behavior at the funeral, paints him as an individual with neither conscience nor sympathy for fellow human beings.

By: Paulanne Simmons

In Albert Camus’ 1942 novel, The Stranger, a French Algerian named Merusault kills an Arab the day after attending his mother’s funeral, where he shows no emotion. Merusault is sentenced to death, in great part because the prosecutor, using the evidence of his Mersault’s behavior at the funeral, paints him as an individual with neither conscience nor sympathy for fellow human beings.

Camus, the prophet of individual freedom, intended the novel to be an illustration of the absurdity of the human condition. Certainly he never thought to make a political statement, which he would have considered one more absurdity.

Nevertheless, playwright Betty Shameih has used Camus’ novel as the inspiration for “The Strangest,” an immersive theatrical experience that brings the audience into a traditional storytelling cafe. In the cafe, Umm (Jacqueline Antaramian) the daughter of the best storyteller in Algeria, offers the audience a tale of murder and mystery.

In 2011, Shamieh traveled to Aleppo where she found the sites where the legendary storytelling cafes once stood. It was there she came to a different understanding of The Stranger: the novel is not about a weird Frenchman but “a colonist killing a native in a deeply racist environment, where desensitization of self and dehumanization of others are necessary ingredients for survival.” Who knew?

Directed by May Adrales and performed by a cast of seven, “The Strangest,” is now onstage at The Fourth Street Theatre, produced by The Semitic Root, an artistic collective or Arabs, Jews and activists of other backgrounds. It is a noble experiment, but Camus’ existentialism sits uneasily with Shamieh and “The Semitic Roots’ activist agenda.”

Early in the play, Umm says she has three sons: Nader (Juri Henly-Cohn), the good Arab; Nounu (Louis Sallan), the harmless Arab; and Nemo (Andrew Guilarte), the bad Arab. Nounu is a shoemaker. Nemo is a thief. Nader is a painter. Umm says it was her husband’s niece, Layali (Roxanna Hope Radja), who brought tragedy down on the household.

Soon Umm informs the audience they will find out which of her sons was murdered at the end of the play. In fact, most of the play is not about the murders but Layali’s attempt to seduce each of the sons and anyone else in town who will make her a wealthy woman. For a play that’s all about mystery, little is left to the imagination.

Unable to get what she wants from anyone else, Layali choses for her final boyfriend a Gun (Brendan Titley) whose only words are “bang.” He seems to represent the evil French colonizers “who arrived here by the power of the gun, stay by the power of the gun, and speak to us only in the language of the gun.” 

More than which son will get murdered, many in the audience may wonder why the playwright spent so much time on Layali and her sexual adventures if she was really trying to make a comment on French colonialism. In the end the real mystery is what is this all about?

The Strangest **
The Fourth Street Theater
83 East 4th Street, NYC
Through April 1, 2017
Running time is 1 hour 30 minutes without intermission
Performances are Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 7:30, and Sundays at 5. Tickets are $25 – $45 and available at  brownpapertickets.com.) Photo: Hunter Canning

The Price *** – Joan of Arc: Into the Fire **

By: David Sheward

“You can do anything as long as you win.” That’s not a quote from the playbook of Donald Trump, but a line from Arthur Miller’s drama The Price, now in a Roundabout Theatre Company revival at the American Airlines Theatre.

By: David Sheward

“You can do anything as long as you win.” That’s not a quote from the playbook of Donald Trump, but a line from Arthur Miller’s drama The Price, now in a Roundabout Theatre Company revival at the American Airlines Theatre. When the play first opened on Broadway in 1968, Miller was critiquing what was then called the “rat race”—the gigantic hamster wheel most Americans were running on in order to pile up money and material goods to impress the neighbors and inflate their self worth. In a furniture-stuffed attic (Derek McLane designed the evocative set), two brothers at opposite ends of the economic spectrum clash over their family’s Depression-era ruin and its aftermath as their boyhood home is about to be torn down and its contents must be sold. The title refers not only to the price of the clan’s furniture but also to the human cost of sacrifice and success. Judged as too heady and talky by audiences and critics, the original run was seen as a disappointment from the author of the classic Death of a Salesman.   

Since then, the play has seen numerous productions (this is the fourth Main Stem production). While it is still not as well-regarded as Salesman, Price’s market value has risen. It’s seen as startlingly relevant for its prescient vision of a nation driven by materialism and the “making-a-deal-at-all-costs” mentality. (One wonders what Miller would have made of our amoral CEO president.) There are still problems with the script. The first act can very easily be taken over the flashy Gregory Solomon, a wily, octogenarian Russian-Jewish appraiser, full of jokes and observations. Solomon is absent for much of the second act when the action mostly consists of retelling past events rather than showing current conflict. Director Terry Kinney and a stellar quartet of actors have not quite overcome these deficiencies—that second act feels particularly long—but they infuse the proceedings with humor and humanity.

Danny DeVito of Taxi fame makes a glorious Broadway debut as the elderly sparkplug Solomon, dispensing wisdom and wisecracks as he munches on hard-boiled eggs and Hershey bars. His comic timing is impeccable as is his insight into this canny survivor. I suspect Mark Ruffalo was battling a cold at the performance attended since he sounded congested, but he managed to work it into his character, the beleaguered brother Victor who gave up a promising scientific career in order to support his crushed father. Ruffalo’s world-weary cop seems to carry the weight of 30 years on his shoulders with every anguished move and the actor’s ailments added to their weight. He also captures Victor’s need for redemption and honor, even in the battle over the furniture.

Tony Shalhoub conveys the guilt and grandiosity of Walter, Victor’s more successful surgeon brother. But he pushes Walter’s narcissism too much, turning him into a monster of selfishness rather than Miller’s more shaded individual. The luminous Jessica Hecht is largely confined to the sidelines as Victor’s long-suffering wife Esther, but she makes watching and supporting an active action. Despite a talk-heavy second act, this is a Price worth paying.

While The Price is an old stock with much value, the prospectus for the new rock musical Joan of Arc: Into the Fire, which opened on the same week at the Public, was more promising than the final product. The creative personnel are impressive. The Talking Heads’ David Bryne and Tony-nominated director Alex Timbers had collaborated on the ingenious and immersive Here Lies Love also at the Public. But their take on the Maid of Orleans lacks—you’ll pardon the expression—fire. There are some innovative and relevant touches. The pre-show curtain contains Senator Mitch McConnell’s admonishment to Elizabeth Warren: “Nevertheless she persisted,” and the cross-dressing Joan is often referred to as transgender. Timbers does have several clever pieces of staging such as having his all-male chorus dressed in Clint Ramos’ rough cloaks with British and French flags on either side so they can play both factions in a stirring battle scene. But the score feels derivative of many other rock operas, especially Lloyd Webber’s Jesus Christ Superstar—there’s even a similar inquisition scene with a campy authority figure mocking the martyred and dirtied protagonist. The show aspires to be Hamilton-like, transforming Joan into an outsider rock star, but the parallels don’t quite work. Making the French rebels into a boy band with mike stands as their weapons lacks the heft of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hip-hop energy.

Jo Lampert in “Joan of Arc: Into The Fire”

Jo Lampert as a punk-goth Joan works very hard and displays stirring rock vocals but she  fails to incite much passion. Ironically, the only moments that evoke real emotion are provided by Mare Winningham who appears as Joan’s mother for a few minutes at the musical’s end. Her heartfelt pleas to erase the stain of sin from her daughter’s soul to a council of clerics are genuinely touching in an otherwise synthetic evening.

The Price ***
March 16—May 7. Roundabout Theatre Company at the American Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St., NYC. Tue—Sat, 8 pm; Wed, Sat, Sun, 2 pm. Running time: two hours and 30 mins. including intermission. $62—$142. (212) 719-1300. www.telecharge.com. Photos: Joan Marcus

Joan of Arc Into the Fire **
March 15—April 30. Public Theatre, 425 Lafayette St, NYC. Tue—Sat, 8:30pm; Sat, Sun, 2:30 pm. Running time: 95 minutes with no intermission. $120. (212) 967-7555. www.publictheater.org. Photos: Joan Marcus

Jo Lampert, Michael James Shaw in “Joan of Arc: Into The Fire”

 

Come from Away *****

By: Paulanne Simmons

When writing about “Come from Away,” husband and wife team Irene Sankoff and David Hein’s musical that pays tribute to Gander, the small Newfoundland town where 38 planes were forced to land after 9/11, the first word that comes to mind is “uplifting.” 

By: Paulanne Simmons

When writing about “Come from Away,” husband and wife team Irene Sankoff and David Hein’s musical that pays tribute to Gander, the small Newfoundland town where 38 planes were forced to land after 9/11, the first word that comes to mind is “uplifting.” 

Indeed this inspiring story about a group of ordinary people who go to extraordinary lengths to do the right thing should warm the heart of even the world’s worst cynic. But the musical, directed by Christopher Ashley, has much more to praise.

First there’s Sankoff and Hein’s spirited score, driving, buoyant and often tuneful, with an appropriately celtic undertone. Because much of the singing is choral, it’s not always easy to decipher the words, but solos such as Jenn Colella’s “Me and The Sky,” show the couples’ ability to capture mood and meaning.

Then there’s the tremendous acting of the 12-member ensemble that is not only called upon to play several roles (both the townspeople and the travelers) but also to change parts, and often clothing, with mind-bending rapidity. These characters are based on interviews with town residents and airline passengers,

The random collection of travelers includes a gay couple, Kevin T. (Chad Kimball) and Kevin J. (Caesar Samayoa), whose love is fading; and a straight couple, divorced mother Diane (Sharon Wheatley) and nerdy Brit Nick (Lee McDougall), whose love is blooming. 

There’s Bob (Rodney Hicks), a young black man whose suspicions and fears have been shaped by racism; and Hannah (Q. Smith), the black mother of a missing New York City firefighter. And of course there’s American Airlines’ first female pilot (Jenn Colleen), even more responsible for the passengers than the Canadians.

The passengers are succored by the goodnatured town mayor (Joel Hatch); the head of the SPCA (Petrina Bromley), who is more concerned with a pregnant bonobo than the humans; the leader of the bus drivers’ union (Chad Kimball), who reluctantly agrees to temporarily end a strike so the drivers can transport the stranded passengers; a local named Beulah (Astrid Van Kieren), who is charged with co-ordinating the town’s efforts, and many heroic, unnamed citizens.

These people come from different cultures and follow different faiths but find common ground in the very moving “Prayer,” one of the high points of the show.

“Come from Away” is not a cultural study of Canadian behavior, a psychological treatise on the human response to crises or political commentary on the causes of terrorism. It is a musical about people who do their best in the worst of times. And for this we can only say thank-you.

Come from Away *****
Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre
236 West 45th Street
Box Office Hours:
Monday – Saturday: 10am – 8pm, Sunday: Noon – 6pm*
*Open until curtain when there is an evening performance.
212 239-6200 Photos: Mathew Murray
For Tickets Click Here 

Moved to Phoenix Theatre in London For More Information Click Here

Linda @ MTC ***

By: Patrick Christiano

An ambitious new play by Penelope Skinner that originated at London’s Royal Court makes New York debut at Manhattan Theatre Club.

The acclaimed award-winning British actress Janie Dee, renowned for her comic flair, is the title character in Penelope Skinner’s satire Linda about a 55- year-old successful marketing executive at the top of her game, working for Swan cosmetics, where she has risen through the ranks to have it all. We first meet the self-assured married mother of two, who can still fit into the same size 10 dress she did 15 years ago, as she likes to point out, at the opening of the play. She is at the office pitching a new anti-aging cream for woman over 50, intent on bringing attention to the 50+ women and keeping them from becoming invisible. Despite Linda’s polished veneer of a successful career and marriage the cracks are beginning to show, and Linda herself is starting to feel invisible.

By: Patrick Christiano

An ambitious new play by Penelope Skinner that originated at London’s Royal Court makes New York debut at Manhattan Theatre Club.

The acclaimed award-winning British actress Janie Dee, renowned for her comic flair, is the title character in Penelope Skinner’s satire Linda about a 55- year-old successful marketing executive at the top of her game, working for Swan cosmetics, where she has risen through the ranks to have it all. We first meet the self-assured married mother of two, who can still fit into the same size 10 dress she did 15 years ago, as she likes to point out, at the opening of the play. She is at the office pitching a new anti-aging cream for woman over 50, intent on bringing attention to the 50+ women and keeping them from becoming invisible. Despite Linda’s polished veneer of a successful career and marriage the cracks are beginning to show, and Linda herself is starting to feel invisible.

Playwright Penelope Skinner also wrote The Village Bike and The Ruins of Civilization and might be deemed a feminist pessimist. Her new play, a dark comedy, is a ruthless look at women in which she tackles numerous themes that resonate for them – sexual harassment, eating disorders, body image, low self-esteem, ageism, self-mutilation, women’s rivalry, and pornography – come to mind instantly. They all figure prominently into the plot of Linda.  Many of the characters are not fully developed, but we still get this check-list of women’s issues, which becomes a subtle reminder of how low you could fall.

The overly plotted melodramatic play with many short scenes in which Skinner keeps piling on the information at the sacrifice of the emotional conflict, although engaging and entertaining, becomes predictable and obvious as soon as Linda’s life begins to unravel. At home Linda’s older daughter, Alice (Jennifer Ikeda), is struggling to deal with a trauma from college, where she has been branded a slut on the internet and explicit pictures of her have been posted. Her younger daughter, Bridget (Molly Ranson), who wants to be an actress, feels ignored by both her parents, and Linda’s self-absorbed husband, Neil (Donald Sage Mackay), who moonlight’s in a rock band, is secretly having an affair. To add to Linda’s ever mounting burdens at the office a younger woman, Amy (Molly Griggs), is brought in by her boss, Dave (John C. Vennema) to take over her account.

Intensely staged by Lynne Meadows Linda is a fast-paced comedy performed on a spectacular revolving set by Walt Spangler that is the highlight of the evening. The absorbing plot developments are thrown out in rapid fire scenes that unfold as quickly as the set spins, punctuated by music after each new scene. The effect is like an elaborate sketch comedy without the emotional build because the action never slows down for a moment to let anything accumulate. The result is like being continually battered by a sledge hammer, where the accomplished actor Janie Dee is fundamentally the same at the beginning of the play as at the end. The story ultimately becomes a bold statement of “what not to do” for women.

John C. Vennema, Janie Dee

Linda began previews on February 3, 2017  and will run through April 2, 2017  Manhattan Theatre Club at City Center – Stage I
131 W. 55th St.
212-581-1212
Photos: Joan Marcus

For Tickets Click Here

Janie Dee

Victory Dance Project Honoring Chita Rivera

Victory Dance Project’s Third Anniversary Celebration to Honor The Legendary Chita Rivera June 15 – 18

 Victory Dance Project, under the Artistic Direction of Amy Jordan, will celebrate its third anniversary with three performances, running June 15 – 18 at Manhattan Movement & Arts Center. The season will open with a Celebration honoring Broadway legend Chita Rivera, who will be presented with the company’s “Woman of Valor Award.” The program, entitled From This Movement On will also include a world premiere choreographed byJordan, as well pieces from the company’s repertory.

Victory Dance Project’s Third Anniversary Celebration will Honor The Legendary Chita Rivera June 15 – 18

 Victory Dance Project, under the Artistic Direction of Amy Jordan, will celebrate its third anniversary with three performances, running June 15 – 18 at Manhattan Movement & Arts Center. The season will open with a Celebration honoring Broadway legend Chita Rivera, who will be presented with the company’s “Woman of Valor Award.” The program, entitled From This Movement On will also include a world premiere choreographed byJordan, as well pieces from the company’s repertory.

Victory Dance Project (VDP) was founded in 2014 by dancer/choreographer Amy Jordan, five years after a horrific bus accident almost took her life.  That day, she resolved that if she survived, she would do a “victory dance” to celebrate, and launched VDP Project with the mission to “Make the Impossible Possible with the Power of Movement.  She is an embodiment of that motto: This season, Amy will return to the stage for the first time since her accident, dancing in a new work choreographed by Christopher Jackson.  In appreciation, she is dedicating the performance to the incredible doctors at the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Burn Unit, who she credits with saving her life.

Victory Dance Project embodies the ideals of transforming adversity into victory, living a healthy lifestyle through dance fitness, and using dance performance as a tool to inspire and encourage people’s hearts and minds. Amy Jordan encourages everyone to ‘Dance Because You Can.

Chita Rivera will be presented with the company’s “Woman of Valor” Award at the Opening Night Celebration on June 15.  The Award honors a woman whose artistic excellence, advocacy and legacy represents the highest level of integrity and artistic vision.

Chita Rivera has won two Tony Awards as Best Leading Actress in a Musical and received eight additional nominations for an exceptional 10 Tony nominations, most recently for her starring role in The Visit. She starred in the Broadway revival of The Mystery of Edwin Drood; the Broadway and touring productions of The Dancer’s Life, a new musical celebrating her spectacular career; and the revival of the Broadway musical Nine with Antonio Banderas. She trained as a ballerina (from age 11) before receiving a scholarship to the School of American Ballet from legendary George Balanchine. Her electric performance as Anita in the original West Side Story on Broadway and in London brought her stardom, and her career is highlighted by starring roles in Bye Bye Birdie, The Rink (Tony Award), Chicago, Jerry’s Girls, Kiss of the Spider Woman (Tony Award). Chita was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in 2009, and received a coveted Kennedy Center Honor in 2002, the first Hispanic woman chosen to receive this award.  In 2016 she headlined at Carnegie Hall and in 2015, PBS’s “Great Performances” aired Chita Rivera: A Lot of Livin’ To Do, a retrospective of her extraordinary life and career. Chita’s current solo CD is entitled And Now I Swing.

Amy Jordan

Amy Jordan’s training and career spans three decades of study and performances in New York, Los Angeles and Miami. She has studied classical ballet, jazz, modern dance and hip-hop with acclaimed choreographers Michael Peters, Michael Rooney, Joe Lanteri and many others.  A diabetic since age 4, she overcame serious health issues and complications from juvenile diabetes. She became active in the diabetes prevention community and started the non-profit Sweet Enuff, to help obese kids deal with their diabetes through dance and exercise.  It was a national top finalist for First Lady Michelle Obama’s “End Childhood Obesity Challenge.” Following an almost fatal bus accident in 2009, which crushed her leg and ended her career as a dancer, Amy founded The Victory Dance Project to prove that ”The impossible is possible through the power of movement.” http://www.amyjordaninc.com

Victory Dance Project’s 2017 season will play three performances, on June 15, 17 and 18 at Manhattan Movement & Arts Center (MMAC), 248 W. 60th Street. The opening night performance will be followed by an Anniversary Celebration sponsored by Stoli Vodka.  Ticket information and complete schedule will be announced shortly. For further information, visit www.victorydance.org.
Photos: Laura Marie Duncan and Brian Thomas

 

“Angry Young Man” Opens

Urban Stages, Frances Hill, Founding Artistic Director brings American Premiere of critically acclaimed British comedy to New York.

Angry Young Man, a timely comedy by award winning playwright Ben Woolf about a Middle Eastern surgeon, who’s arrival in London is fraught with witty mishaps, opened at Urban Stages, 259 West 30th Street in New York.  A superb cast meticulously helmed by Stephen Hamilton with comic panache keeps the fast-paced tale moving at a delirious pace for a brisk 75 minutes. The gifted ensemble features Christopher Daftsios, Rami Margron, Max Samuels, and Nazli Sarpkaya.
Click Here for REVIEW

Urban Stages, Frances Hill, Founding Artistic Director brings American Premiere of critically acclaimed British comedy to New York.

Angry Young Man, a timely comedy by award winning playwright Ben Woolf about a Middle Eastern surgeon, who’s arrival in London is fraught with witty mishaps, opened at Urban Stages, 259 West 30th Street in New York.  A superb cast meticulously helmed by Stephen Hamilton with comic panache keeps the fast-paced tale moving at a delirious pace for a brisk 75 minutes. The gifted ensemble features Christopher Daftsios, Rami Margron, Max Samuels, and Nazli Sarpkaya.
Click Here for REVIEW

The limited run at Urban Stages is through April 9,2017 and will be followed up a by a run at Guild Hall in East Hampton from May 31 through June 18. The performance schedule  at Urban Stages, 259 West 30th Street, is Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 7pm, Saturday a 3pm & 7pm and Sunday at 3pm. No evening performance on March 29 and April 5th.  For tickets call 866-811-4111.

Photography: Barry Gordin

Tony Walton Yuka SIlvera, Maxine Leu, Gen LeRoy

Costume Designer Yuka Silvera, Director Stephen Hamilton

Gen LeRoy, Emma Walton Hamilton

Founder/Artistic Director Urban Stages Frances Hill, Director Stephen Hamilton, Christopher Daftsios

Director Stephen Hamilton, Rami Margron, Nazli Sarpkaya

Stephen Hamilton, Christopher Daftsios

Tony Walton, Stephen Hamilton

Urban Stages Founder/Artistic Director Francis Hill, Rami Margron, Nazli Sarpkaya, Director Stephen Hamilton, Max Samuels, Christopher Daftsios, Urban Stages Associates Artistic Director Peter Napolitano

Christopher Daftsios

Rami Margron

Nazli Sarpkaya

Max Samuels

 

 

Live Out Loud

LIVE OUT LOUD  Kick -Off Reception at the New Amsterdam Theater

LIVE OUT LOUD hosted a lively kick-off reception at the New Amsterdam Theater on West 42 Street for their annual Young Trailblazers Gala that will take place on June 5th at TheTimesCenter in NYC. Catering was provided by David Ellis Events and Spirits were provided by Tito’s Handmade Vodka and Barefoot Wine & Bubbly. 

LIVE OUT LOUD  Kick -Off Reception at the New Amsterdam Theater

LIVE OUT LOUD hosted a lively kick-off reception at the New Amsterdam Theater on West 42 Street for their annual Young Trailblazers Gala that will take place on June 5th at TheTimesCenter in NYC. Catering was provided by David Ellis Events and Spirits were provided by Tito’s Handmade Vodka and Barefoot Wine & Bubbly. 

 Live Out Loud inspires, nurtures and empowers LGBTQ youth to build a successful future by connecting them to positive role models and affirmative experiences in the LGBTQ community.

By providing youth with opportunities to interact with adults who understand the realities of living openly as a member of the LGBTQ community, Live Out Loud helps young people to achieve academic success, healthy relationships, rewarding careers, and a fulfilling life.

Live Out Loud’s Young Trailblazers Gala is an annual event where 400 donors, corporate supporters, elected officials and youth scholarship winners celebrate Live Out Loud’s life-affirming educational programming for LGBTQ youth. At the event, Live Out Loud will honor advocates in the community who further our mission, and will present three $10,000 scholarships to high school seniors for their leadership in the LGBTQ community – a favorite moment of the evening. 

 For Tickets and more information go to www.liveoutloud.info

 Tuesday, June 5, 2017 5:30pm VIP Entry. Doors Open 6pm until 9:30pm TheTimesCenter, 242 W 41st Street in NYC
Early-bird tickets are $200 until Monday, April 3rd, 2017. Afterwards tickets are $250.

Photography: Barry Gordin

Edie Windsor, Judith Kasen-Windsor

Edie Windsor, Zach Wichter

David Nickle, Bruce T. Sloane, Hal Rubinstein

Angelique Piwinski, Edie Windsor

Come from Away *** – Idomeneo ***

By: David Sheward

Is it appropriate for a Broadway musical to address the staggering impact of the 2001 attacks on America? Come from Away, the new Canadian tuner, answers with a resounding yes. Husband and wife librettist-songwriters Irene Sankoff and David Hein have solved the problem of their super-heavy subject matter by focusing on a positive aspect of the tragedy. When terrorists were using planes as bombs targeting the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, several hundred flights were diverted to Gander, a tiny town in New Foundland where thousands of passengers had to remain for days. How the citizens and their guests from around the world coped with this logistical nightmare forms the main thread of the show with several individual story-strands interwoven throughout. The New Foundlanders respond to the demands with grace and humor and the panicked “plane people” gradually warm to them.

By: David Sheward

Is it appropriate for a Broadway musical to address the staggering impact of the 2001 attacks on America? Come from Away, the new Canadian tuner, answers with a resounding yes. Husband and wife librettist-songwriters Irene Sankoff and David Hein have solved the problem of their super-heavy subject matter by focusing on a positive aspect of the tragedy. When terrorists were using planes as bombs targeting the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, several hundred flights were diverted to Gander, a tiny town in New Foundland where thousands of passengers had to remain for days. How the citizens and their guests from around the world coped with this logistical nightmare forms the main thread of the show with several individual story-strands interwoven throughout. The New Foundlanders respond to the demands with grace and humor and the panicked “plane people” gradually warm to them.

Yes, the book is episodic and the songs are a bit treacly here and there, occasionally taking a mite too much inspiration from the Titanic theme which is quoted ironically more than once. However, Sankoff and Hein resist these Lifetime-TV temptations for the most part, leavening syrupy “feel-good” tropes with sharp wit and memorable, Gaelic-flavored music.

Director Christopher Ashley keeps the many characters and settings clear with a precise, fluid direction and strong, detail-laden performances from a twelve-member cast playing multiple roles. Jenn Colella has the sole solo number as a pioneering female pilot and soars with it. Joel Hatch is dryly deadpan as the town’s mayor. Rodney Hicks gets maximum comic mileage out of a New Yorker’s skepticism at his hosts’ hospitality. Lee MacDougall and Sharon Wheatley are endearingly awkward as middle-aged strangers who become long-distance lovers. Chad Kimball and Caesar Samayoa lend snap to a quarreling gay couple. Petrina Bromley delivers an animal lover’s concern for pets trapped on board with a direct honesty. Astrid Van Wierren is refreshingly blunt as a no-nonsense teacher. Kendra Kassebaum makes a nervous new TV reporter endearingly eager and Q. Smith emotes with intensity as a mother seeking word of her firefighter son.

Jean Colella in Come From Away

Not all instincts tapped by the crisis are noble. A Muslim traveller (played with dignity by Samayoa) is treated with fear and suspicion, though gradually befriended by the townspeople, and then subjected to a humiliating interrogation. I would have preferred Sankoff and Hein had ventured further into this darkness, to give a fuller picture of the story. But despite its slight flaws, Come From Away offers a reassuring and heartening take on the earth-shattering event that launched us into an age of terrifying uncertainty.

The Metropolitan Opera’s staging of Mozart’s Idemeneo is also about a community in crisis, but the citizens of ancient Crete are handling a ravenous sea monster rather than an influx of displaced passengers. This revival of Jean-Pierre Ponnelle’s 1982 staging is gorgeously sung by soprano Ying Fang as the delicate princess Ilia, baritone Matthew Polenzani in the title role, and mezzo-soprano Alice Coote in the trouser role of the prince Adamante. Maestro James Levine delivers his customary exquisite handling of the Met orchestra. But the four-hour evening is stolen by Elza van den Heever as the treacherously jealous Elettra.

Matthew Polenzani in Idomeneo at the Met

Like a libidinous tornado swooping in from another opera (such as Strauss’ modernistic Electra about the same mythological figure), van den Heeven sweeps away all before her in a whirlwind of diva passion. During her Act Two aria in which Elettra eagerly anticipates thwarting her rival Ilia and ensnaring Adamante, she practically makes love to the furniture as she physicalizes her character’s devouring lust. Then after everyone else finds a happy ending, she consumes the stage in a towering rage and collapses, choking on her own fury. Most of Ponnelle’s staging is of the “stand and deliver” or “park and bark” variety where the singers are planted center stage and hold forth for their solos. Van den Heever is anything but stationary or static, taking command of this massive work and wrestling it to the ground.

Come From Away ***
Opened March 12 for an open run. Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45th St., NYC. Tue, Thu, 7 pm; Wed, Fri—Sat, 8 pm; Wed, Sat, 2 pm; Sun, 3 pm. $47—$157. Running time: one hour and 40 mins. with no intermission. $47—$157. (212) 239-6200. www.telecharge.com.
Photos: Mathew Murphy

Moved to London Phoenix Theater Click Here for More Information 

Come From Away

Idomeneo ***
 March 6—25. Metropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center, 66th St. and Broadway, NYC. Repertory schedule. Running time: four hours including two intermissions. $25—$460. (212) 362-6000 or www.metopera.org.
Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Alice Coote[/caption]

Baby, Dream Your Dream @ 92nd Street Y ****

By: Linda Amiel Burns

The famed Lyrics & Lyricist series at the 92nd Street Y celebrated Dorothy Fields and the Women of the American Songbook in “Baby, Dream Your Dream.”

By: Linda Amiel Burns

The famed Lyrics & Lyricist series at the 92nd Street Y celebrated Dorothy Fields and the Women of the American Songbook in “Baby, Dream Your Dream.”

The Third Concert of Lyrics & Lyricists at the 92nd Street Y was held on March 18-20 to honor women songwriters in “Baby, Dream Your Dream: Dorothy Fields and the Women of the American Songbook.”  Deborah Grace Winer, the series artistic director served as writer and charming host. The terrific all female cast starred Kenita Miller, Nancy Opel, Margo Seibert, Emily Skinner and special guest artist, the remarkable Marilyn Maye.  The renowned music director John Oddo was the arranger/orchestrator on piano and led the ironically all male

Band consisting of Aaron Heick on reeds, Scott Harrell on trumpet, Jay Leonhart on bass and James Saporito on drums.  The program was smoothly director by Mark Waldrop.

According to Program notes by Winer,  “Tin Pan Alley was always a ‘boys’ club’ but a few brilliant persistent women elbowed their way in creating some of the most iconic songs and musical in the American pantheon.  Dorothy Fields led the way (collaborating with Jerome Kern and others) and winning an Oscar for her lyrics to  “The Way You Look tonight by the age of 30, and becoming the only woman whose name sits alongside the Gershwins, Kern, Berlin, Porter, Rodgers, Hart, Hammerstein and other A-listers of the American Songbook.”

The show opened with the cast performing “Baby, Dream Your Dream” followed by “There’s Gotta Be Something Better Than This” from Sweet Charity written by Dorothy Fields and Cy Coleman (1966).  Two of Fields most famous songs were written with Jimmy McHugh “On The Sunny Side of the Street” sung beautifully by Emily, and Margo sang a sweet rendition of  “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love.”

There were only a handful of female songwriters but Fields was not alone in her time. The standouts were Kay Swift (music) who wrote “Can’t We Be Friends” with Paul James in 1929 sung by Kenita.  Nancy performed “You Oughta Be in Pictures” that Dana Suesse wrote the music for with Edward Heyman.  The cast sang Ann Ronell’s (written with Frank Churchill) “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf” from the 1933 film Three Little Pigs, which was a political statement at the time.  Other female songwriters came later and stood on the shoulders of these pioneers.

Many people didn’t realize that Billie Holiday wrote her iconic song “God Bless The Child” with Arthur Herzog, Jr. and Kenita scored with.  The brilliant Betty Comden (with Adolph Green) was represented with Nancy’s dynamite rendition of “If You Hadn’t- But You Did” from Two On The Aisle and “The Party’s Over” from Bells Are Ringing both with music by Jule Styne.  Another fabulous female composer was Carolyn Leigh who wrote Little Me with Cy Coleman and Kenita sang “I’ve Got Your Number” and Nancy scored with “When In Rome” and Emily’s love voice was perfect for “It Amazes Me.”  Mary Rodgers, daughter of Richard, wrote Once Upon A Mattress with Marshall Barer and the show made Carol Burnett a star in 1959.  Kenita did a great job on one of the hits from that show, “Shy.”

The extraordinary Marilyn Maye rocked the room with “You’re Gonna Hear From Me” written by Dory Previn with her then husband Andre Previn from the film Inside Daisy Clover (1965).

She also sang a wonderful rendition of  “Fever” that Peggy Lee wrote additional lyrics to.  A highlight of the show was her thrilling “Fifty Percent” from Ballroom written by Marilyn Bergman (with her husband Alan and music by Billy Goldenberg).

Another great moment was the emotional “Back To Before” sung in parts by the cast, from Ragtime with lyrics by Lynn Ahrens (and music by Stephen Flaherty).  The show closed with the optimistic “The Best Is Yet To Come” by Carolyn Leigh with Cy Coleman and as the lyrics appeared on the screen, the audience happily joined in.

There are two more concerts “yet to come” in this series.

May 6-8 Songbook Classics by Unsung Lyricists

Rob Fisher, Artistic Director with Sheldon Harnick

June 3-5 From Camelot to California – the Worlds of Lerner & Lowe with Rob Berman, Artistic Director

For Tickets Call 212 415-5500 or Visit www.92Y/concerts

Hello Dolly

Hello, Dolly!, starring legendary performer Bette Midler. Directed by four-time Tony Award® winner Jerry Zaks and choreographed by Tony Award winner Warren Carlyle, Hello, Dolly! began preview performances at Broadway’s Shubert Theatre (225 West 44th Street) on March 15, 2017, with an official opening night of April 20, 2017.  

Hello, Dolly!, starring legendary performer Bette Midler. Directed by four-time Tony Award® winner Jerry Zaks and choreographed by Tony Award winner Warren Carlyle, Hello, Dolly! began preview performances at Broadway’s Shubert Theatre (225 West 44th Street) on March 15, 2017, with an official opening night of April 20, 2017.  

Ms. Midler, and  David Hyde Pierce (Horace Vandergelder), will be joined by two-time Tony Award® nominee Gavin Creel (Cornelius Hackl), Tony Award® nominee Kate Baldwin (Irene Molloy), Taylor Trensch (Barnaby Tucker), Will Burton (Ambrose Kemper), Melanie Moore (Ermengarde), Tony Award® nominee Jennifer Simard (Ernestina), and an ensemble of twenty-seven.

The complete creative/design team for the production, features three-time Tony Award® winner Santo Loquasto (Scenic & Costume Design), five-time Tony Award® winner Natasha Katz (Lighting Design), Tony Award® winner Scott Lehrer (Sound Design), Andy Einhorn (Music Direction), Tony Award® winner Larry Hochman (Orchestrations), Tony Award® winner Don Pippin (Vocal Arrangements), Glen Kelly (Dance Arrangements), and Telsey + Company (Casting).

The ensemble features Cameron Adams, Phillip Attmore, Giuseppe Bausilio, Justin Bowen, Elizabeth Earley, Taeler Elyse Cyrus, Leslie Donna Flesner, Jenifer Foote, Jessica Lee Goldyn, Blake Hammond, Stephen Hanna, Michael Hartung, Robert Hartwell, Amanda LaMotte, Analisa Leaming, Jess LeProtto, Ian Liberto, Kevin Ligon, Nathan Madden, Linda Mugleston, Hayley Podschun, Jessica Sheridan, Michaeljon Slinger, Christian Dante White, Branch Woodman, Ryan Worsing, and Richard Riaz Yoder.

This new production of Hello, Dolly! the first new production of this classic musical to appear on Broadway since it opened more than fifty years ago, will pay tribute to the original work of legendary director/choreographer Gower Champion, which has been hailed both then and now as one of the greatest stagings in musical theater history.

Based on Thornton Wilder’s farce The Matchmaker, Hello, Dolly! caused an instant sensation when it premiered on Broadway in 1964, starring Carol Channing in the title role.  It went on to win a record-shattering ten Tony Awards, including those for Best Musical, Best Book of a Musical, Best Original Score, Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical, Best Direction of a Musical, Best Producer of a Musical, Best Choreography, Best Scenic Design, and Best Costume Design.  It was also named Best Musical by the New York Drama Critics’ Circle. Its original Broadway cast recording hit the top of the Billboard album chart, and years later was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.  It also marked the greatest producing triumph of legendary impresario David Merrick, running for 2,844 performances over seven years and breaking the record for the longest running show in Broadway history.   In addition to Ms. Channing, an astonishing list of Broadway and Hollywood luminaries have inhabited the role of Dolly Gallagher Levi, including Pearl Bailey, Phyllis Diller, Betty Grable, Martha Raye, Ginger Rogers, Ethel Merman (in her last appearance on Broadway), and Mary Martin, who led the West End company.
Photo: Julieta Cervantes

For Tickets to Hello Dolly Click Here