Epiphany **1/2

By: Paulanne Simmons

June 28,2022: I must admit I read James Joyce’s “The Dead” so many years ago that I had no idea what the short story was about when I saw Brian Watkins’ Epiphany.  But even if I had remembered it word-for-word, I don’t think I would have enjoyed the play any the better. This is because, absent the characters’ names and the dinner party setting, it’s doubtful even Joyce would recognize his story.

By: Paulanne Simmons

June 28,2022: I must admit I read James Joyce’s “The Dead” so many years ago that I had no idea what the short story was about when I saw Brian Watkins’ Epiphany.  But even if I had remembered it word-for-word, I don’t think I would have enjoyed the play any the better. This is because, absent the characters’ names and the dinner party setting, it’s doubtful even Joyce would recognize his story.

True, John Lee Beatty’s set, with its ominous staircases, shadowy lighting and large windows that let us glimpse the snow falling heavily outdoors, is superb. And Marylouise Burke, as the dotty Morkan, leads a wonderful cast made up of the guests she has invited to a dinner celebrating the Epiphany: 

Carmen Zilles, C.J. Wilson, Marylouise Burke, Colby Minifie, Omar Metwally (seated), David Ryan Smith, Francois Battiste, and Jonathan Hadary.

Ames (Jonathan Hadary) is Morkan’s friend of 47 years. Loren (Colby Minifie) is a new 20ish friend who is helping Morkan with this sumptuous goose dinner, even though she’s a vegan. Freddie (C.J. Wilson) is a teacher with a drinking problem. Kelly (Heather Burns) is a pianist with a drinking problem. Charlie (Francois Battiste) is a lawyer who doesn’t seem to have any problems at all. And there’s a gay couple, Sam (Omar Metwally), a psychiatrist and his husband, Taylor (David Ryan Smith).

Much of the dialogue is quite funny, if it has little dramatic substance. A great deal of the conversation is about what the Epiphany really is. A literary movement? A pagan festival? It seems extraordinary that in a country with a predominantly Christian population, so many people could be so ignorant. The rest of the play’s 110 minutes (without intermission) is taken up by conversation among well-heeled intellectuals ruminating over the profundities of life. If Samuel Beckett’s Estragon and Vladimir had gone to college, they might have sounded like this gang.

More striking is what the conversation does not reveal: how Morkan knows all these people, how many of them know each other, what kind of relationship the guests have with their host. 

There is a smattering of action, most of it absurd. Ames stabs himself with a knife while lying under the table, but he appears to be in no pain and his wound is bloodless. ­­­­Loren accidentally pushes the knife in deeper in a move that reminds one of the Three Stooges. Kelly uses fingers and elbows to play something everyone would rather not hear on the piano.

Jonathan Hadary, C.J. Wilson, Heather Burns, Marylouise Burke, and Omar Metwally 

From the very beginning we know this is going to be an unusual night. Director Tyne Rafaeli tells us with ominous sounds that start the show. Soon Morkan informs all her guests they must put their cell phones in a box she has provided for the evening. We can feel for them.

What’s more, as the evening proceeds, it becomes apparent the guests have no idea the role they are to play in the festivities, because no one has read the instructions that came with the invitation. Or perhaps there really were no instructions at all. As a result, no one has brought a poem, no one knows the song Morkan wants them to sing, and they are not prepared to dance with each other.

Perhaps some of this confusion would have been cleared up if Morkan’s beloved nephew, Gabriel, had been able to make it to the dinner. But, as he is suffering from profound depression at the time, he has sent Aran (Carmen Zilles), a pleasant but passionless replacement. Aran arrives with the speech Gabriel was to have made, but as luck would have it, she dropped the speech in the snow on the way to Morkan’s home, leaving only tantalizing hints of what he had to say. 

It’s not until dinner has been consumed and dessert is about to be served that anyone notices Morkan’s sister, Julia, is absent. Morkan’s sorrowful explanation might have pulled everything together and made Epiphany a truly moving play. But by this time, many people in the audience may just want to get out.

Epiphany runs through July 24 at the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater, 150 West 65 Street. Photography: Jeremy Daniel

Pride Celebration @ LongHouse

Hamptons Pride celebrated with a Fundraiser at LongHouse on Sunday.

June 26, 2022:  Hamptons Pride, the East End’s new LGBTQ+ nonprofit that brought you the first Pride parade in the history of the Hamptons celebrated at LongHouse on Sunday. 

Hamptons Pride celebrated with a Fundraiser at LongHouse on Sunday.

June 26, 2022:  Hamptons Pride, the East End’s new LGBTQ+ nonprofit that brought you the first Pride parade in the history of the Hamptons celebrated at LongHouse on Sunday. 

Julie Bluestone Jazz Trio

This outdoor fundraiser included live music by the Julie Bluestone Jazz Trio, wines and cider by Wölffer Estate Vineyards, and light bites by private chef Natalie Nichols. The silent auction featured works by local artists, home decor items, gift cards to restaurants and shops, and much more.  All money raised supports activities and programs for East End LGBTQ+ people and their allies.

Hampton Pride, Inc, is a not-for-profit 501c3 established by locals for the benefit of locals. The organization’s founding goal is the creation of an historical marker and outdoor social area on the footprint of The Swamp (the last and longest-running gay club in the Hamptons) in what is now Wainscott Green, a park in the Town of East Hampton.

Photography: Barry Gordin

Tom House (Founder Hamptons Pride)
Dr. Eric Lella , D.O. (Stony Brook Southampton Hospital )
Bill Martin
Peter Olsen, Nina Gillman (Nina Gillman, Co-President LongHouse Reserve, Patrick Christiano with Truman
Carrie Rebora Barratt, (Director LongHouse Reserve) Tom House (Founder Hamptons Pride)
Durell Godfrey
Dianne Benson (Co- President LongHouse Reserve, Simon Kinsella, Peter Olsen

East Hampton First Pride Parade 2022

June 4, 2022: East Hampton First Ever PRIDE Parade 2022: with Patrick Christiano, Publisher of TheaterLife.com and Jerry Larsen, the Mayor of East Hampton,, community leaders and over 500 people in support of Gay Pride, organized by Tom House.

June 4, 2022: East Hampton First Ever PRIDE Parade 2022: with Patrick Christiano, Publisher of TheaterLife.com and Jerry Larsen, the Mayor of East Hampton,, community leaders and over 500 people in support of Gay Pride, organized by Tom House.

The Orchard ****

By: Bernard Carragher

June 24, 2022: “The Orchard,” based on Anton Chekov’s 1903 play “The Cherry Orchard” is at the Baryshnikov Arts Center on 37th Street and acted by the Arlekin Players Theatre and (zero-G) Virtual Theater Lab. Although “The Cherry Orchard” is accepted as a classic and one of the great dramas written in last twentieth century, this bitter-sweet play is rarely ever acted because of its combination of broad comedy and gentle pathos and requires a stage full of gifted players. The director Igor Golyack, born in Kyiv, Serbia and educated in Moscow, has found a group of nine wonderful actors and fitted them into his own unique staging and Carol Rocamora’s fresh and free translation. They make the play come alive and breathe and laugh and weep as only Chekov can convey.  

By: Bernard Carragher

June 24, 2022: “The Orchard,” based on Anton Chekov’s 1903 play “The Cherry Orchard” is at the Baryshnikov Arts Center on 37th Street and acted by the Arlekin Players Theatre and (zero-G) Virtual Theater Lab. Although “The Cherry Orchard” is accepted as a classic and one of the great dramas written in last twentieth century, this bitter-sweet play is rarely ever acted because of its combination of broad comedy and gentle pathos and requires a stage full of gifted players. The director Igor Golyack, born in Kyiv, Serbia and educated in Moscow, has found a group of nine wonderful actors and fitted them into his own unique staging and Carol Rocamora’s fresh and free translation. They make the play come alive and breathe and laugh and weep as only Chekov can convey.  

At the start Jessica Hecht sets the right tone. As Madame Raneuskaya, the flutter-brained mistress of the great Russian estate, she is pretty, aristocratic, elegantly dressed in beautiful costumes by Oana Botez , but gullible , giddy and pathetically weak in the face of a crisis as most human beings are. Chekov brings this landed lady back to her ancestral home after six years in Paris, at a time of her estate, with that magnificent cherry orchard, is about to be sold for debts.

Darya Denisova, Nael Nacer, Mark Nelson, Jessica Hecht, Juliet Brett, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Nael Nacer, Elise Kibler and John McGinty. Photo: Pavel Antonov

She has no money, having run through a fortune chasing after a worthless man since her husband died and her beloved little boy was drowned. Her prattling brother Gaev, played by the excellent Mark Nelson, can’t help her; he is too penniless and given to day dreams. He is taken care of by Firs, the mumbling old butler, brilliantly acted by Mikhail Baryshnikov. Firs, was born into the family as a serf, stayed after the serfs were freed and now, at 90, fusses about the house, scolding  his master, Gaev, for going outside in the wrong pants. Baryshnikov is not 90 — he is 75 — but  achieves Firs look with a shaggy white toupee and make-up and aging black butler’s suit.

Ranevskaya’s 17 year old daughter Anya (Juliett Brett) can’t help her . She is sweet but without resources. Her love is Trofimov (John McGinty) , a mute teacher, in love with Anya, and like almost everyone in the  play he is a dreamer too.

Darya Denisova, Jessica Hecht, Juliet Brett and Mark Nelson. Photo: Maria Baranova

Varya (Elise Kibler) is a half sister and is the house maid. She wants to marry the local Lohpakhin (Nael Nacer). He is the only person in the household that is practical. He grew up the son of a serf and now has become a millionaire  businessman. Unlike Ranevskaya he tries to help her face her fianancial problems. He tells her she must sell her house and land including her orchard. She can’t do it. The days of estates have ended Russia and the world is entering a new era.She still refuses. The estate is auctioned off to Lophakin, while Raneskaya gives a party and dance in her yard overlooking the cherry orchard. All the guests perform including the magnificent turn by the robot dog and also Firs. The next day Ranevskaya’s tearfully leaves but asks Lohpakhin not to start axing the cherry orchard until she is on the train to Paris.

Golyak carries out some of the lessons his Russian teachers taught him. A 12 foot robotic arm  is on the on the set off the estate and there is a charming robotic dog. Robotics design is by Tom Sepe. He also uses Virtual Theater, a form that blends elements of cinema,video games and live performers. But none of this takes over Chekov’s dramatic effects. Nobody projects, nobody overplays, whether for comedy or for pathos. They are all fused into Chekov’s harmonious pattern of  Russia 1903.

The Orchard ****
Arleen Players Theatre and (zero-G) Virtual Theater Lab at Baryshnikov Arts Center
450 W. 37th St., NYC.
Tue—Thu 7pm; Fri 8pm; Sat 2pm & 8pm; Sun 2pm.
Running time: two hours with no intermission. $39—$125. www.ovationtix.com.
June 16—July 3, 2022
Photography: Pavel Antonov and Maria Baranova 

Corsicana ***

By: Samuel L. Leiter

June 22, 2022: There was no escaping the buzz of anticipation at Playwrights Horizons as I and the rest of the full house waited for a preview performance of Will Arbery’s disappointing new play, Corsicana. After all, actress Deirdre O’Connell, one of New York theatre’s cherished but, to the general public, not-that-well-known actresses, had, only several nights before, gone from the unsung to the sung by winning a Tony for her exceptional performance in Lucas Hnath’s Dana H., in which her tour-de-force performance was entirely lip-synched.

By: Samuel L. Leiter

June 22, 2022: There was no escaping the buzz of anticipation at Playwrights Horizons as I and the rest of the full house waited for a preview performance of Will Arbery’s disappointing new play, Corsicana. After all, actress Deirdre O’Connell, one of New York theatre’s cherished but, to the general public, not-that-well-known actresses, had, only several nights before, gone from the unsung to the sung by winning a Tony for her exceptional performance in Lucas Hnath’s Dana H., in which her tour-de-force performance was entirely lip-synched.

One could just feel the urge among one’s fellow theatregoers to salute this 68-year-old artist’s achievement with a burst of applause on her entrance, something she may rarely, if ever, have experienced in her long career. But when the time came, her entrance was a soft one, meant to bring her on as quietly as possible to take an unobtrusive place in the shadows at the side; there—considered “offstage”—she would await her formal participation in the action. A wishful smattering of clapping arose, only to be quickly hushed when its inappropriateness became clear. This was the anticlimactic start to an anticlimactic evening.

Deirdre O’Connell

Ms. O’Connell, in an ensemble role less challenging, at least from an audience perspective, than what her role required in Dana H., is her usual outstanding self, sensitive, insightful, intelligent, and warm. However, her role of Justice, a small-town librarian, can’t be compared, let’s say, to Meryl Streep climbing one step higher on the acting-challenge mountain with each new character. A big award sets up the kind of big expectations to which, fairly or not, Justice doesn’t do justice.

Given Corsicana’s purpose, in fact, the bulk of our attention soon goes not to Ms. O’Connell but to the sweetly satisfying performance of Jamie Brewer, an actress with Down syndrome, who plays the similarly affected Ginny. She’s the currently depressed, 34-year-old half-sibling of 33-year-old, would-be filmmaker Christopher (Will Dagger). Following their mother’s death, Christopher has put his stumbling career on hold so he can care for his grieving sister’s needs while he teaches film at a community college in their Texas hometown of Corsicana. 

Harold Surratt

As Arbery (Heroes of the Fourth Turning, a 2020 Pulitzer finalist)has explained in interviews and elsewhere, the play was inspired by his desire to write about his relationship with his own sister with Down syndrome. It’s only peripherally autobiographical, however, as he grew up in Dallas, had a much larger family (seven sisters!), and followed a different religion.
To flesh the play out, he’s added the characters of two invented people. One is Ms. O’Connell’s Justice, a close family friend, in her 60s. It’s she who introduces Christopher to the other character, a reclusive, barefoot, African-American musician/sculptor in his 60s named Lot (Harold Surratt) Why barefoot? Who knows?

Bringing in the new people allows Arbery to flesh out Ginny’s personality and problems, social and psychological, with an artificial situation (there’s very little plot). Hoping it will lift Ginny’s spirits, Christopher enlists the hesitant Lot to be a sort of companion to the music-loving Ginny, with the aim of writing a song with her. Lot’s songs, you see, are the narrative kind where you compose music to words you say more or less normally to express your thoughts. Ginny’s tastes, though, incline toward Hillary Duff, the Chicks, and Whitney Houston. Still, Ginny and Lot each have a need that the other fulfills. 

There are a few bumps along the road, especially because of the initially uncomfortable match of the shy, uncertain, nervous Lot, and the unconventional Ginny, who has the potential to spark misunderstandings, which she does. (The forgettable song Ginny and Lot write was composed by Joanna Sternberg and Mr. Arbery.)

Deirdre O’Connell , Will Dagger, Jamie Brewer

There’s a lot of talk about peripheral matters, but there’s little dramatic action over the course of two and a half slow-paced, pause-filled hours. The dialogue, however, is often interesting, if prolix and sometimes quirkily vague, and the acting is consistently fine, although Mr. Dagger’s nasality can be annoying. Mr. Surratt is particularly effective. 

Ginny, like the actress who plays her, is high-functioning, which I hope is how you would describe it; she’s articulate, physically agile (she busts some moves), and often seems wiser than those around her. In fact, if it weren’t for certain physical characteristics, you might not even know she had Down syndrome. The condition itself is not addressed in any detail, so it’s not always clear—aside from issues even non-affected people might have, including the shakes—just what Ginny’s most disturbing symptoms are, or why she needs constant babysitting (a word she hates).

Jamie Brewer

Mr. Arbery has said the play isn’t really “about” anything, but of course it is. Among other things, it’s about sibling love, family, community, grieving, friendship, caretaking, music-making, and romantic love (Justice trashes romance but she has a crush on Lot). That doesn’t, however, save Corsicana from dullness or absolve it from dramatic stasis.

Sam Gold (Macbeth, with Daniel Craig and Ruth Negga) is one of our few notable, if inconsistently noteworthy, conceptualist directors. I have loved some of his offbeat productions and loathed others. My reaction to Corsicana’s direction leans more in the direction of the latter than the former. Mr. Gold, for instance, seems to think the best way to capture Corsicana’s intimate world, much of which transpires in Ginny and Christopher’s ranch house, is to open the space up as widely as possible, placing it under a greenhouse roof.  

Deirdre OConnell, Harold-Surratt

Mr. Gold’s set designers, Laura Jellenik and Cate McCrea, have created a broad expanse within low, unadorned white walls; there’s barely any furniture aside from two leather couches, one upstage one down, moved around from scene to scene on a revolving stage. Hovering overhead is the peaked, translucent roof of what looks exactly like a greenhouse shed, its metal pillars at either side set into a track so, for reasons God only knows, the actors can move them up or downstage as the scene requires. 

Gold resorts as well to the cliché of having the offstage actors visible at the sides, where, in this vast space, their lurking presences contribute to a sense of alienation and loneliness that seems antithetical to the heartfelt human connections Arbery wishes to convey. Isabella Byrd did the moody lighting, and Qween Jean handled the everyday costumes.

There’s a word that runs through Corsicana, and even in Mr. Arbery’s program note. It clearly affected Ms. O’Connell, who used it in her Tony acceptance speech. The word is “weird.” There’s nothing really weird about Corsicana. However, the way it’s been put on the Playwrights Horizons stage? Weird.

Corsicana
Playwrights Horizons
416 W. 42nd Street, NYC
Through July 10, 2022
Photography: Julieta Cervantes

The Orchard ***

By: David Sheward

June 21, 2022: The prospect of the great ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov and Jessica Hecht, one of our most versatile and expressive actresses, in a new adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s classic The Cherry Orchard was an exciting and irresistible prospect. But The Orchard, director-conceiver Igor Golyak’s sci-fi deconstruction of this beloved portrait of a Russian landowning family displaced by overwhelming change, has so much going on that the passions, humor, and sorrow of the original are almost obliterated. 

By: David Sheward

June 21, 2022: The prospect of the great ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov and Jessica Hecht, one of our most versatile and expressive actresses, in a new adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s classic The Cherry Orchard was an exciting and irresistible prospect. But The Orchard, director-conceiver Igor Golyak’s sci-fi deconstruction of this beloved portrait of a Russian landowning family displaced by overwhelming change, has so much going on that the passions, humor, and sorrow of the original are almost obliterated. 

My first warning of trouble came when entering the Baryshnikov Arts Center and being confronted with what appeared to be either a gigantic mechanical sculpture or a piece of misplaced medical equipment. This ultramodern item stuck out like a sore thumb amid Anna Fedorova’s abstract blue-toned set which was littered with blue confetti (cherry blossoms, perhaps, but the wrong color). The huge object turns out to be a robotic arm with a camera at one end which projects images of the action on a scrim at the edge of the stage and onto the Internet for those viewing the play in a digital version (more on that later). 

Darya Denisova, Nael Nacer, Mark Nelson, Jessica Hecht, Juliet Brett, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Nael Nacer, Elise Kibler and John McGinty. Photo: Pavel Antonov

The arm moves, stands in for a bookcase and a tree, manipulates props, and becomes a sort of character, as does a cute robot dog. In addition, there’s an online auction among those at home watching the play, taking place simultaneously during the auction for the cherry orchard itself. Translations from various languages including Russian, French, and ASL periodically and inconsistently appear on the scrim as do random stage directions. These digital and mechanical devices don’t really add much to the story or effectively support Golyak’s interpretation, but distract from Chekhov’s compassionate depiction of the flawed family, their friends and servants. (For some reason, the comic servants Yasha, Dunyasha, and Yepikhodov and the lovably buffoonish neighbor Simeonov-Pischik have been eliminated. Their humorous relief is much missed.)

If these futuristic touches served to emphasize the Ranevskys’ disconnection with an increasingly unfamiliar society they would make sense, but they just seem to be inserted just to allow multiple camera angles and blown-up images. It’s a pity because the solid international cast does convey loads of subtext. Too bad Golyak’s gimmicks obscure their fine work. 

Darya Denisova, Jessica Hecht, Juliet Brett and Mark Nelson. Photo: Maria Baranova

Baryshnikov is illuminatingly tender as the ancient servant Firs, usually a supporting role, but beefed up here. The magnificent dancer gives specific physical life to this remnant of a bygone era in evocative dance movement, unfortunately difficult to discern because of Golyak’s busy staging and Yuki Nakase Link’s dim lighting. Oana Botez’s dark-hued, monochromatic costumes don’t help lightening things up. Jessica Hecht captures the dithery charm and intense passion of Ravenskaya, oblivious to her dwindling chances to save her home and focused only on past regrets and present amours. The scene where the former peasant Lopakhin, who has taken possession of the estate, fails to propose to Raneskaya’s lonely daughter Varya, is particularly heartbreaking and beautifully played by Nael Nacer and Elise Kibler. Kimber is especially moving as her giddiness of the possibility of marriage fades into the sad realization that Lopakhin will never pop the question. There is also detailed limning in the form of Mark Nelson’s frivolous Gaev, Darya Denisova’s boisterous governess Charlotta Ivanovna, Juliett Brett’s earnest Anya, and John McGinty’s intense radical student Trofimov (even though the deaf actor’s sign language is not always interpreted for us, his intentions are clear). 

John McGinty, Juliet Brett, Mark Nelson, Nael Nacer, Jessica Hecht, Elise Kibler and Darya Denisova. Photo: Pavel Antonov

The only sequence where Golyak’s reimagining completely works is when a passer-by interrupts a family picnic. In Chekhov’s original, a sound like a wire snapping (representing a breaking of the old order) precedes the entrance of a vagrant (the underclass) who briefly alarms the sheltered aristocrats and foreshadows their destruction. Here, the sound is an explosion and the passer-by is a brutish thug (a menacing Ilia Volok), speaking in untranslated Russian, who physically harasses the frightened party and sexually assaults the terrified Varya. The explosion and the intruder can represent the Bolshevik Revolution, the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl, and/or the current Russian invasion of Ukraine (Golyak’s home country). The muddled production suddenly becomes horrifying real.

The virtual version of the play is not that much different from the live experience. Before joining the production in real time, Internet viewers are given a tour of the theater, opening into various virtual spaces where Baryshnikov plays the playwright and he and Hecht read letters and diary entries. It’s an enchanting but short addendum. We then join the play and have the option of seeing it from the robot camera’s POV. When I watched the digital edition two nights after seeing the live staging, my laptop’s screen kept freezing and I had to hit the refresh button several times. Just as with the actual production presented behind a scrim and cluttered with robots, too much technology interfered with Chekhov’s timeless vision.

Nael Nacer Photo: Pavel Antonov

June 16—July 3. Arleen Players Theatre and (zero-G) Virtual Theater Lab at Baryshnikov Arts Center, 450 W. 37th St., NYC. Tue—Thu 7pm; Fri 8pm; Sat 2pm & 8pm; Sun 2pm. Running time: two hours with no intermission. $39—$125. www.ovationtix.com.
Photography: Pavel Antonov and Maria Baranova 

Darya Denisova, Nael Nacer, Jessica Hecht, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Mark Nelson.
Photo: Maria Baranova

Broadway Update

Broadway Update: Suzan-Lori Parks, Lorraine Hansberry

By: David Sheward

June 19, 2022: Many African-American women playwrights such as Lynn Nottage, Aleasha Harris, Dominique Morriseau, Antoinette Chinonye Nwandu, and Erika Dickerson-Despina have had their work celebrated in the just-finished 2022-23 New York theater season. Two pioneering black women authors will be celebrated in many ways in 2022-23 on and Off-Broadway. Lorraine Hansberry, the first black woman to have a play produced on Broadway, will appear as a character in a play and have her landmark A Raisin in the Sun revived. Suzan-Lori Parks, the first black woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for drama, will also see the play that got her that honor on stage again as well as a slew of new works.

Broadway Update: Suzan-Lori Parks, Lorraine Hansberry

By: David Sheward

June 19, 2022: Many African-American women playwrights such as Lynn Nottage, Aleasha Harris, Dominique Morriseau, Antoinette Chinonye Nwandu, and Erika Dickerson-Despina have had their work celebrated in the just-finished 2022-23 New York theater season. Two pioneering black women authors will be celebrated in many ways in 2022-23 on and Off-Broadway. Lorraine Hansberry, the first black woman to have a play produced on Broadway, will appear as a character in a play and have her landmark A Raisin in the Sun revived. Suzan-Lori Parks, the first black woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for drama, will also see the play that got her that honor on stage again as well as a slew of new works.

Parks’ Topdog/Underdog will be presented in a 20th anniversary production directed by Tony winner Kenny Leon at the Golden Theater with previews beginning Sept. 27 for an Oct. 20 opening. Tony nominee Corey Hawkins (In the Heights, The Tragedy of Macbeth) and Emmy winner Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (Watchmen) comprise the entire cast as two brothers obsessed with history and a street card game. The play began life at the Public Theater and then transferred to Broadway with Jeffrey Wright and Mos Def in 2002.

Parks is now Writer-in-Residence at the Public and she will have two new works presented there this coming season. Plays for the Plague Year (Nov. 4-27) is the result of Parks’ project to write a play every day from the start of the pandemic theater lockdown on March 13, 2020. This sweeping look at how the pandemic effected us all will be staged in the intimate Joe’s Pub. Parks has also written the book for The Harder They Fall (Winter 2023), a new musical based on the 1972 film about a young singer challenging the corrupt music industry in Jamaica. The score will consists of songs from the film by Jimmy Cliff.

Lorraine Hansberry also figures prominently in the Public’s 2022-23 season. She is a character in Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge (Sept. 24-Oct. 16), a new work derived from the notorious debate between celebrated author James Baldwin and prominent conservative intellectual William F. Buckley in 1965 on the topic “Is the American Dream at the expense of the American Negro?” The piece conceived by Greig Sargeant with Elevator Repair Service recreates the famous match-up and concludes with a scene between Baldwin and his close friend Hansberry. 

Lorraine Hansberry

Hansberry is best known for her first big hit A Raisin in the Sun which opened in 1959 and won the New York Drama Critics Circle for Best American Play. She died tragically young at the age of 34 only a few years later. Raisin, the story of the struggling Younger family and their deferred dreams, has had two prominent Broadway revivals (2004, and 2014, both directed by Kenny Leon), a Tony-winning musical version, a film version, two TV adaptations (PBS’ American Playhouse and an ABC-TV adaptation derived from Leon’s 2004 staging) as well as literally hundreds of regional, college, and community productions. The Public will present the latest revival of this American classic with a new staging by Tony nominee and Obie winner Robert O’Hara (Slave Play, Bootycandy) (Sept. 27-Nov. 6). Given O’Hara’s track record of unconventional direction, it should be very interesting to see what he does with this beloved classic which has always been done in a fairly straightforward, kitchen-sink style.

Also on the Public’s roster: Mohegan theater-maker Madelyn Sayet’s solo piece Where We Belong on colonialism, Brexit and gloablization (Oct. 28-Nov. 27); Ryan J. Haddad’s autobiographical Dark Disabled Stories on coping with cerebral palsey (Winter 2023); Pulitzer Prize winner James Ijames’ Good Bones about the cost of gentrification (Spring 2023); and Erika Dickerson-Despina’s Shadow/Land (Spring 2023) concerning a family facing ruin in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. 

James Baldwin and William F. Buckley’s
1965 debate is the basis of a play set for
this fall at the Public Theater.
Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun
will be revived at the Public
.

2022-23 Broadway/Off-Broadway Schedule

June 20–Chita Rivera Awards (NYU Skirball)

June 22–Coriscana (Playwrights Horizons)

June 28–Hamlet (Park Avenue Armory)

July 10–Into the Woods (St. James)

July 11–Richard III (Public Theater/Delacorte)

July 21–The Kite Runner (Hayes)

Aug. 25–Kinky Boots (Stage 42)

Summer 2022–As You Like It (Delacorte)

Sept. 19–The Piano Lesson (St. James) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 19–Death of a Salesman (Hudson) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 22–Sesame Street: The Musical (Theater Row)

Sept. 24–Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 27–A Raisin in the Sun (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Oct. 2–Leopoldstadt (Longacre)

Oct. 6–1776 (Roundabout/AA)

Oct. 11–Almost Famous (a Shubert theater TBA)

Oct. 20–Topdog/Underdog (Golden)

Oct. 28–Where We Belong (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Nov. 4–Plays for the Plague Year (Public Theater) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Nov. 10–Kimberly Akimbo (Booth)

Nov. 20–KPOP (Circle in the Square)

Dec. 4–A Beautiful Noise: The Neil Diamond Musical (Broadhurst)

Dec. 8–Camelot (Lincoln Center/Vivian Beaumont)

Dec. 11–Some Like It Hot (Shubert)

Fall 2022 (no dates yet)

Between Riverside and Crazy (Second Stage/Hayes)

the bandaged place (Roundabout/Underground)

Camp Siegfried (Second Stage/Tony Kiser)

Cost of Living (MTC/Friedman)

Summer, 1976 (MTC/City Center Stage II)

Where the Mountain Meets the Sea (MTC/City Center Stage I)

2022-23 (no dates or theaters yet)

Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death, Black Orpheus, Cinderella, Come Fall in Love–The DDLJ Musical, Dancin’, The Ohio State Murders, Pal Joey, Square One

Winter 2022-23

Dark Disabled Stories (Public)

The Wanderers (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Spring 2023 

Prime Facie (a Shubert theater TBA)

The Thanksgiving Play (Second Stage/Hayes)

Good Bones (Public)

Poor Yella Rednecks (MTC/City Center Stage II)

Shadow/Land (Public)

2023 and Beyond

Game of Thrones, The Great Gatsby

Future–Good Night, Oscar; The Devil Wears Prada; The Griswolds’ Family Vacation; The Karate Kid; Back to the Future; Our Town; The Nanny; The Normal Heart/The Destiny of Me; Sing Street; Smash; Soul Train; The Who’s Tommy

Snow in Midsummer **

By: Samuel L. Leiter

June 19, 2022: As someone who has been studying Asian theatre for sixty years—in my salad days I even acted in an “authentic” Beijing Opera directed by a Chinese expert—I was particularly interested in seeing Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s modern updating of Snow in Midsummer. This Yuan period classic play, by 13th-century dramatist Guan Hanqing, is perhaps better known as The Injustice to Dou Yi That Moved Heaven and Earth. Like some of Shakespeare’s plays, it has been subject to multiple adaptations on stage and screen, albeit not in English. The current version was premiered by the Royal Shakespeare Festival in 2017, followed by its American premiere the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in 2018. One can only imagine that those versions were more satisfactory than Zi Alikhan’s leaden production now running at the Classic Stage Company

By: Samuel L. Leiter

June 19, 2022: As someone who has been studying Asian theatre for sixty years—in my salad days I even acted in an “authentic” Beijing Opera directed by a Chinese expert—I was particularly interested in seeing Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s modern updating of Snow in Midsummer. This Yuan period classic play, by 13th-century dramatist Guan Hanqing, is perhaps better known as The Injustice to Dou Yi That Moved Heaven and Earth. Like some of Shakespeare’s plays, it has been subject to multiple adaptations on stage and screen, albeit not in English. The current version was premiered by the Royal Shakespeare Festival in 2017, followed by its American premiere the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in 2018. One can only imagine that those versions were more satisfactory than Zi Alikhan’s leaden production now running at the Classic Stage Company

Teresa Avia Lim, Alex Vinh, Julian Leong, Paul Juhn and Wai Ching Ho.

The original’s essential story concerns the death sentence given to a young widow, Dou Yi, unjustly convicted of murdering a powerful man named Zhang. In her plea for mercy before being executed, she predicts that if she dies there will be three serious consequences, all of which—like the one in the title—come true, proving her innocence but still not clearing her name. Her ghost returns three years later to seek justice, a goal it eventually achieves.

Within this framework, the plot developments—set in a town called New Harmony—have been altered considerably; the structure also has been changed, so that the truth behind how Zhang was killed—so overblown as to shatter belief—is enacted late in the play, not early. Following the plot’s progress, especially in the first of the play’s two acts, is not always easy.

Dorcas Leung

The chief characters are Dou Yi (Dorcas Leung), much of whose stage time is as an unconvincing ghost; Tianyun (Teresa Avia Lim), a successful businesswoman in her 40s who has come to buy the town’s artificial flower-making factory; Handsome Zhang (John Yi), the gay, guilty son of the man Dou Yi is believed to have killed, who owns the factory Tianyun is buying; Master Zhang (Kenneth Lee), the chief villain, Handsome’s monstrously cruel father; Rocket Wu (Tommy Bo), the man with whom Handsome is in love, and who is distressed to learn, after a heart transplant, that his new organ comes from the late murderess; Fei-Fei (Fin Moulding), Tianyun’s seven-year-old daughter, who has an affinity with the supernatural; Doctor Lu (Mr. Lee again), the corrupt town physician; Judge Wu (Mr. Lee yet again), the lecherous judge who decides to execute Dou Yi when she refuses his advances; Nurse Wong (Wai Ching Ho), whom we are led to believe was Handsome’s wet nurse; and Mother Cai (also Ms. Ho), the woman to whom Dou Yi was sold when she was seven. There are also several minor roles requiring the doubling services of Paul Juhn, Julian Leong, and Alex Vinh.

Snow in Midsummer, as transformed into contemporary terms, has too many melodramatic plot twists and contrivances of the secrets and lies category to recount; lacking theatrical panache in their presentation, they’re impossible to take seriously. Chinese classical drama is a largely musical form, with the words often sung aria-like renditions; moreover, it employs highly stylized movement and gestures. Perhaps a musical version might have worked better than this combination of realism and pseudo-poetic artifice.  

Despite being set in the quotidian environment of a contemporary town—barroom scenes are common—which reduces the need for overt stylization, Cowhig’s two-and-a-half hour play contains much that’s clearly intended as high drama. To fully register, it needs to create a world of imaginative innovation, not the mostly realistic approach taken here, which only makes the fantasy elements—like a ghost that crawls around like a child being spooky on Halloween, or the falling of snow—impossible to accept. What should be highly atmospheric is ploddingly mundane, made even more so by the mostly superficial acting that substitutes shouting for big emotions.

Tommy Bo

The show doesn’t skimp on serious themes, if that’s what you’re hungry for, so you can imagine their presence in the form of climate change (one of Dou Yi’s prophecies is a drought), judicial misconduct, homophobia, illegal organ harvesting, and women’s rights, among others. All are seeded in the action but none have edible sprouts. It might also be pointed out that the production notes point to a need to address anti-Asian violence, ignoring the Asian on Asian violence in the play. 

Chinese classical theatre employs the simplest means, usually no more than a table and a couple of chairs, to conjure up its locales, although the costumes are famous for their colorful expressiveness. The minimalist set created here by the design team of “dots,” however, with well-drilled actors shifting a few pieces of furniture from scene to scene, is of little help in clarifying where things are happening, nor is it redeemed by anything remotely interesting, such as the balcony area overlooking the three-quarters round set, or the odd entranceway beneath it. Johanna Pan’s dull costumes fail to offer much visual appeal, either, leaving Jeanette Oi-Suk’s lighting to do the heavy lifting, which it’s only sporadically capable of doing.

A mere fifty people or so were seated in the CSC’s 199-seat Lynn F. Angelson Theater the night I went. To a person, they rose to give the show a standing ovation. I couldn’t help thinking it would be a snowy midsummer day before I joined them. 

Snow in Midsummer
Lynn F. Angelson Theater/Classic Stage Company
138 E. 13th Street, NYC
Through July 9, 2022
Photography: Julieta Cervantes

Wai Ching Ho and Teresa Avia Lim.

Drama Desk Awards

The 66th Drama Desk Awards were presented at Sardi’s on June 14th

June 15, 2022: The 2022 Drama Desk Awards, announced earlier this month, were presented in an afternoon ceremony at the legendary Sardi’s Restaurant on West 44th Street. Produced by Tony winner Scott Mauro the annual celebration, honoring Broadway and beyond, was not presented for the past two years due to COVID. This year’s show was written by Bruce Vilanch and streamed live on Broadway On Demand free of charge.
Photography: Barry Gordin

The 66th Drama Desk Awards were presented at Sardi’s on June 14th

June 15, 2022: The 2022 Drama Desk Awards, announced earlier this month, were presented in an afternoon ceremony at the legendary Sardi’s Restaurant on West 44th Street. Produced by Tony winner Scott Mauro the annual celebration, honoring Broadway and beyond, was not presented for the past two years due to COVID. This year’s show was written by Bruce Vilanch and streamed live on Broadway On Demand free of charge.
Photography: Barry Gordin

Harmony: A New Musical, Eric Peters, Sean Bell, Steven Telsey, Danny Kornfeld, Blake Roman, Zal Owen
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSC_2037-1024x678.jpg
David Barbour, Martha Wade Steketee, Charles Wright
Kristina Wong (Outstanding Solo Performance.Sweatshop Overlord)
Kristina Wong, Heidi Schreck
Matt Doyle (Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical Company)
Francis Benhamou (Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play, Prayer for the French Republic)
Adam Rigg, Lileana Blain-Cruz
Eric Peters, Sean Bell, Danny Kornfeld, Steven Telsey, Blake Roman, Zal Owen
Leslie Kritzer
Kerry Butler
Kerry Butler
Lucy Moss (Outstanding Solo Performance Sweatshop Overload), David Barbour, Charles Wright (Co-Presidents of the Drama Desk)
Leslie Kritzer, Kerry Butler
Tectonic Theater Project and Madison Wells Live
Linda Armstrong
Matt Doyle (Outstanding Actor in a Musical Company)
Adam Rigg
Adam Rigg, Lileana Blain-Cruz
Lileana Blain-Cruz
Lileana Blain-Cruz, Adam Rigg, James Ortiz
James Ortiz (Outstanding Puppet Design: The Skin of Our Teeth, Lincoln Center Theater)
Marilu Henner
Mark William
Richie Ridge
Jamie deRoy, Rob Shuter
Jamie deRoy, Bill Hutton
Darius Harper, Nick Carell, Renee Elise Goldsberry, Jesse Nager, Kevin Scheuring, Anthony Festa
The Broadway Boys
 Jennifer Moeller (Outstanding Costume Design for a Play: Clyde’s, Second Stage Theater
Gabriella Slade (Outstanding Costume Design for a Musical Presented by Production Resource Group:, Six
David Brian Brown (Outstanding Wig and Hair: Mrs. Doubtfire)
Jessica Hecht
Natasha Katz (Outstanding Lighting Design for a Musical (tie):  MJ; and Bradley King, Flying Over Sunset, Lincoln Center Theater
David Barbour, Charles Wright Co Presidents of The Drama Desk
Jaquel Spivey, Outstanding Actor in a Musical, A Strange Loop
Brittany Johnson
Talia Suskauer
Brittany Johnson, Talia Suskauer
Dede Ayite (Additional Special Awards: Costume designer (Merry WivesSeven Deadly SinsThe Last of the Love LettersChicken and BiscuitsSlave PlayNollywood DreamsAmerican Buffalo, and How I learned to Drive)
 Benjamin Pearcy (Outstanding Projection Design: 59 Productions, Flying Over Sunset, Lincoln Center Theater)
 Beowulf Boritt (Outstanding Scenic Design for a Musical Presented by Hudson Scenic: Beowulf Boritt, Flying Over Sunset, Lincoln Center Theater)
Adrianna Hicks, Andrea Macasaet, Anna Uzele, Samantha Pauly, Brittney Mack
Marjan Neshat, Sanaz Toossi
Jason Michael Webb, David Holcenberg
Anna Uzele 
Lucy Moss
Anna Uzele, Adrianna Hicks, Andrea Macasaet, Lucy Moss, Toby Marlow, Gabriella Slade, Samantha Pauly, Brittney Mack
Ruben Santiago-Hudson, (Outstanding Actor in a play, Lackawanna Blues)
Condola Rashad
Ruben Santiago-Hudson, Condola Rashad
Joaquina Kalukango (Outstanding Access in a Musical, Paradise Square)
Heather Christian
Sean Bell, Steven Telsey, Danny Kornfeld, Bruce Sussman, Eric Peters, Blake Roman, Zal Owen(Harmony)
Bruce Sussman (Outstanding Book of a Musical, Harmony)
Jacelyn Bioh
Liz Callaway
Gelan Lambert, Cloe Davis, Garrett Coleman (Outstanding Choreography, Paradise Square)
Lynne Meadow, Charles Busch
Joshua Harmon
Marilu Henner, Jeffory Lawson, Renee Elise Goldsberg
Cristina Raé
Derek McLane
Khalifa White, Khadija.Sankoh, Cristina Rae, (Little Shop of Horrors)
Samantha Pauly, Isa Goldberg, Nanette Shaw, Brittney Mack
David Sheward, Kristina Wong
Charles Busch

The Bedwetter ****

By: David Sheward

June 16, 2022: As you might expect, any musical from the pen of the notoriously profane comedienne Sarah Silverman has more than its share of what we used to call dirty jokes. But The Bedwetter (Atlantic Theater Company’s Linda Gross Theater), the new musical based on Silverman’s memoir of her traumatic childhood, is also an insightful and moving depiction of dysfunctional family dynamics, a little girl’s triumph over insecurity and the healing power of comedy. It’s also pretty damn funny.… and dirty.

By: David Sheward

June 16, 2022: As you might expect, any musical from the pen of the notoriously profane comedienne Sarah Silverman has more than its share of what we used to call dirty jokes. But The Bedwetter (Atlantic Theater Company’s Linda Gross Theater), the new musical based on Silverman’s memoir of her traumatic childhood, is also an insightful and moving depiction of dysfunctional family dynamics, a little girl’s triumph over insecurity and the healing power of comedy. It’s also pretty damn funny.… and dirty.

Caissie Levy (Beth Ann) and Emily Zimmerman (Laura)

Ten-year-old Sarah (precociously talented Zoe Glick) is starting at a new school in 1980s New Hampshire after her parents have divorced. Her depressed, movie-obsessed mother Beth Ann (magnificently complex Caissie Levy) won’t get out of bed because of the breakup and the long-ago crib death of Sarah’s baby brother. Her older sister Laura (appropriately snide Emily Zimmerman) refuses to speak to her at school. Her dad Donald (riotously crude but loving Darren Goldstein) is sleeping around and her grandma (wry Bebe Neuwirth) is an alcoholic. (Bonus: Nana is teaching her how to mix the perfect Manhattan.) But her biggest problem is that she still wets the bed, preventing her from attending sleepovers and endangering new friendships. All these traumas send Sarah into a tailspin of anxiety and sorrow. Despite the gloom surrounding her and massive prescriptions of anti-depressants, Sarah’s love of performing pulls her through.

Though the plot may sound like an Afterschool Special, the sharp and witty book by Silverman and Joshua Harmon (Admissions, Prayer for the French Republic) is caustic and wise without indulging in syrupy sentiment. The songs are equally double-edged. The snappy music by Adam Schlesinger and intricate, funny lyrics by Schlesinger and Silverman satirize musical-comedy and feel-good movie conventions while genuinely expressing inner turmoil. For example, in one fantastically staged sequence, a TV jingle for Donald’s cut-rate clothing store becomes a riotous examination of his marriage’s breakdown.

Zoe Glick (Sarah) and Darren Goldstein (Donald)

Like that innovative number, the rest of Anne Kaufman’s staging is a weirdly satisfying mix of sketch comedy, realistic scenes, and musical nuttiness. One minute we’re witnessing a painful moment between father and daughter in a doctor’s office as they discuss the root of her nocturnal urination dilemma, the next a chorus line of tranquilizers played by three tween girls bursts through the curtains and the manic doctor leads everyone in a tribute to the joys of sedatives. (Kaye Voyce did the clever costumes and Laura Jellinek created the versatile set.) 

Young Zoe Glick is a marvel as the afflicted but hilariously hyper Sarah. She captures the girl’s raunchy humor and desperate longing for stability, while launching zingers with the timing worthy of a veteran adult stand-up. Caissie Levy is heartbreaking as Beth Ann, Sarah’s overwhelmed mother and Darren Goldstein finds the tenderness under the asshole exterior of her caring but emotionally clumsy dad Donald. Bebe Neuwirth is martini-dry as the cocktail-loving grandma and Emily Zimmerman captures sister Laura’s conflicted affections. Ellyn Marie Marsh as a dictatorial teacher, Rick Crom as a pair of neurotic doctors, and Ashley Blanchet as a fantasy beauty queen garner guffaws in brilliant cameos. Charlotte Elizabeth Curtis, Charlotte MacLeod, and Margot Weintraub display professional zest and sharp snark as a trio of middle-school mean girls. Bravo to all these Bedwetters.

The Bedwetter ****
June 7—July 3. Atlantic Theater Company at the Linda Gross Theater, 336 W. 20th St., NYC. Tue 7pm; Wed 2pm & 8pm; Thu 7pm; Fri 8pm; Sat 2pm & 8pm; Sun 8pm. Running time: two hours including intermission. $86.50. www.ovationtix.com. Photography: Ahron R. Foster

Zoe Glick (Sarah) and Rick Crom (Dr. Grimm)
Margot Weintraub (Amy), Charlotte Elizabeth Curtis (Ally), Zoe Glick and Charlotte MacLeod (Abby)

Drama Desk 2022 Winners

Winners for the 66th Annual Drama Desk Awards
This year’s Drama Desk Awards will take place at Sardi’s Restaurant (234 W 44th Street) on June 14th from 3:00 – 6:00pm.

June 14, 2022: In keeping with the Drama Desk‘s mission, the nominators considered shows that opened on Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Off-Off Broadway between July 2, 2021 and May 1, 2022 for this year’s Awards. Only live performances were eligible – if performances were also available for streaming, 21 or more unique live performances were required. 

Winners for the 66th Annual Drama Desk Awards
This year’s Drama Desk Awards will take place at Sardi’s Restaurant (234 W 44th Street) on June 14th from 3:00 – 6:00pm.

June 14, 2022: In keeping with the Drama Desk‘s mission, the nominators considered shows that opened on Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Off-Off Broadway between July 2, 2021 and May 1, 2022 for this year’s Awards. Only live performances were eligible – if performances were also available for streaming, 21 or more unique live performances were required. 

Limited tickets to the ceremony are available at: www.DramaDeskAwards.com and to purchase an ad in the virtual program, please email Dustin Fitzharris at dfitz.geo@yahoo.com.

The Drama Desk Awards are produced by Tony Award winner Scott Mauro/Scott Mauro Entertainment and the show is being written by six-time Emmy Award winner Bruce Vilanch.

About The Drama Desk 

The Drama Desk Awards, which are presented annually, honor outstanding achievement by professional theater artists on Broadway, Off Broadway, and Off Off Broadway. What sets the Drama Desk Awards apart is that they are voted on and bestowed by theater critics, journalists, editors, and publishers covering theater. 

The 2021-2022 Drama Desk Nominating Committee is composed of: Martha Wade Steketee (Chair; freelance, UrbanExcavations.com), Peter Filichia (Broadway Radio), Kenji Fujishima (freelance: Theatermania), Juan Michael Porter II (TheBody.com; freelance: TDF Stages, Did They Like It?, New York Theatre Guide), Ayanna Prescod (freelance: Variety, New York Theatre Guide, Today Tix), Zachary Stewart (TheaterMania), and Diep Tran (freelance: Backstage, American Theatre, Broadway News, New York Theater Guide).

Follow the Drama Desk Awards: @DramaDeskAwards on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook for updates.

2022 DRAMA DESK AWARD WINNERS

**Winners are highlighted and starred

Outstanding Play

Cullud Wattah, by Erika Dickerson-Despenza, The Public Theater

English, by Sanaz Toossi, Atlantic Theater Company

**Prayer for the French Republic, by Joshua Harmon, Manhattan Theatre Club

Sanctuary City, by Martyna Majok, New York Theatre Workshop (LAST NAME:  MY-ohk)

Selling Kabul, by Sylvia Khoury, Playwrights Horizons

The Chinese Lady, by Lloyd Suh, The Public Theater

Outstanding Musical

Harmony, National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene (PR: Folx-BEEN)

Intimate Apparel, Lincoln Center Theater

**Kimberly Akimbo, Atlantic Theater Company

Six

The Hang, HERE Arts Center

Outstanding Revival of a Play

for colored girls who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf

**How I Learned to Drive, Manhattan Theatre Club

Lackawanna Blues, Manhattan Theatre Club

Skeleton Crew, Manhattan Theatre Club

Trouble in Mind, Roundabout Theatre Company 

Twilight: Lost Angeles, 1992, Signature Theatre

Outstanding Revival of a Musical

Assassins, Classic Stage Company

Baby, Out of the Box Theatrics

Caroline, or Change, Roundabout Theatre Company

**Company

Outstanding Actor in a Play

Brandon J. Dirden, Skeleton Crew, Manhattan Theatre Club

Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Take Me Out, Second Stage Theater

Jacob Ming-Trent, Merry Wives, The Public Theater (Free Shakespeare in the Park)

**Ruben Santiago-Hudson, Lackawanna Blues, Manhattan Theatre Club

John Douglas Thompson, The Merchant of Venice, Theatre for a New Audience

Outstanding Actress in a Play

Tala Ashe, English, Atlantic Theater Company 

Ruth Negga, Macbeth

Andrea Patterson, Cullud Wattah, The Public Theater

**Phylicia Rashad, Skeleton Crew, Manhattan Theatre Club

Shannon Tyo, The Chinese Lady, The Public Theater

Michelle Wilson, Confederates, Signature Theatre

Outstanding Actor in a Musical

Billy Crystal, Mr. Saturday Night

Myles Frost, MJ

Rob McClure, Mrs. Doubtfire

**Jaquel Spivey, A Strange Loop

Chip Zien, Harmony, National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene (PR: Folx-BEEN)

Outstanding Actress in a Musical

Kearstin Piper Brown, Intimate Apparel, Lincoln Center Theater

Victoria Clark, Kimberly Akimbo,Atlantic Theater Company

Sharon D. Clarke, Caroline, or Change, Roundabout Theatre Company

Jeanna de Waal, Diana

**Joaquina Kalukango, Paradise Square 

Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play

Joshua Boone, Skeleton Crew, Manhattan Theatre Club

Chuck Cooper, Trouble in Mind, Roundabout Theatre Company

Daniel K. Isaac, The Chinese Lady, The Public Theater

Billy Eugene Jones, On Sugarland, New York Theatre Workshop

**Ron Cephas Jones, Clyde’s, Second Stage Theater 

Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play

**Francis Benhamou, Prayer for the French Republic, Manhattan Theatre Club 

Stephanie Berry, On Sugarland, New York Theatre Workshop

Sonnie Brown, what you are now, Ensemble Studio Theatre

Page Leong, Out of Time, NAATCO and The Public Theater

Kenita R. Miller, for colored girls who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf

Kara Young, Clyde’s, Second Stage Theater 

Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical

Justin Austin, Intimate Apparel, Lincoln Center Theater

Justin Cooley, Kimberly Akimbo,Atlantic Theater Company

**Matt Doyle, Company

Jared Grimes, Funny Girl

Tavon Olds-Sample, MJ

Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical

Judy Kuhn, Assassins, Classic Stage Company

Tamika Lawrence, Black No More, The New Group

**Patti LuPone, Company

Bonnie Milligan, Kimberly Akimbo, Atlantic Theater Company

Jennifer Simard, Company 

Outstanding Director of a Play

Knud Adams, English, Atlantic Theater Company

Saheem Ali, Merry Wives, The Public Theater (Free Shakespeare in the Park)

**Rebecca Frecknall, Sanctuary City, New York Theatre Workshop

Taibi Magar, Twilight: Lost Angeles, 1992, Signature Theatre 

Whitney White, On Sugarland, New York Theatre Workshop

Outstanding Director of a Musical

John Doyle, Assassins, Classic Stage Company

**Marianne Elliott, Company

Lucy Moss and Jamie Armitage, Six

Bartlett Sher, Intimate Apparel, Lincoln Center Theater

Jessica Stone, Kimberly Akimbo,Atlantic Theater Company 

Outstanding Choreography

Ayodele Casel (tap choreography), Funny Girl 

Carrie-Anne Ingrouille, Six 

**Bill T. Jones, Garrett Coleman,and Jason Oremus (Irish + Hammerstep), Gelan Lambert and Chloe Davis (associates), Paradise Square

Liam Steel, Company

Christopher Wheeldon, Michael Balderrama (associate), Rich + Tone Taleuega (Michael Jackson movement), MJ (PR: Ta-LOW-Ga)

Outstanding Music

**Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss, Six

Jason Howland, Paradise Square

Matt Ray, The Hang, HERE Arts Center

Carrie Rodriguez, ¡Americano!

Jeanine Tesori, Kimberly Akimbo,Atlantic Theater Company

Outstanding Lyrics 

Amanda Green, Mr. Saturday Night

Taylor Mac, The Hang, HERE Arts Center

**Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss, Six

David Lindsay-Abaire, Kimberly Akimbo,Atlantic Theater Company

Lynn Nottage, Intimate Apparel, Lincoln Center Theater

Shaina Taub, Suffs, The Public Theater

Outstanding Book of a Musical 

Billy Crystal, Lowell Ganz, and Babaloo Mandel, Mr. Saturday Night

Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss, Six

Lynn Nottage, Intimate Apparel, Lincoln Center Theater (

**Bruce Sussman, Harmony, National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene 

Outstanding Orchestrations

Tom Curran, Six

Greg Jarrett, Assassins, Classic Stage Company

Mark Hartman and Yasuhiko Fukuoka, The Streets of New York, Irish Repertory Theatre 

**Jason Michael Webb and David Holcenberg, MJ

Outstanding Music in a Play

Te’La and Kamauu, Thoughts of a Colored Man

**Bill Sims Jr., Lackawanna Blues, Manhattan Theatre Club 

Michael Thurber and Farai Malianga (drum compositions), Merry Wives, The Public Theater (Free Shakespeare in the Park) 

Outstanding Scenic Design for a Play

Beowulf Boritt, Merry Wives, The Public Theater (Free Shakespeare in the Park)

Wilson Chin, Pass Over

Marsha Ginsberg, English, Atlantic Theater Company

**Takeshi Kata, Clyde’s, Second Stage Theater

Junghyun Georgia Lee, Kristina Wong, Sweatshop Overlord, New York Theatre Workshop 

Outstanding Scenic Design for a Musical 

Emma Bailey, Six

**Beowulf Boritt, Flying Over Sunset, Lincoln Center Theater

Bunny Christie, Company

David Zinn, Kimberly Akimbo, Atlantic Theater Company

Outstanding Costume Design for a Play

Linda Cho, The Chinese Lady, The Public Theater

Gregory Gale, Fairycakes

Tilly Grimes, The Alchemist, Red Bull Theater

Qween Jean, On Sugarland, New York Theatre Workshop

**Jennifer Moeller, Clyde’s, Second Stage Theater

Outstanding Costume Design for a Musical 

Machine Dazzle, The Hang, HERE Arts Center

Susan Hilferty, Funny Girl

Santo Loquasto, The Music Man

**Gabriella Slade, Six

Catherine Zuber, Intimate Apparel, Lincoln Center Theater

Outstanding Lighting Design for a Play

**Christopher Akerlind, Clyde’s, Second Stage Theater

Reza Behjat, English, Atlantic Theater Company

Isabella Byrd, Sanctuary City, New York Theatre Workshop

**Amith Chandrashaker, Prayer for the French Republic, Manhattan Theatre Club

Jeanette Oi-Suk Yew, Cullud Wattah, The Public Theater

Outstanding Lighting Design for a Musical

Natasha Katz, Diana

**Natasha Katz, MJ

**Bradley King, Flying Over Sunset, Lincoln Center Theater

Jennifer Tipton, Intimate Apparel, Lincoln Center Theater

Outstanding Projection Design

**59 Productions, Flying Over Sunset, Lincoln Center Theater

David Bengali, Twilight: Lost Angeles, 1992, Signature Theatre

Stefania Bulbarella and Alex Basco Koch, Space Dogs, MCC Theater

Shawn Duan, The Chinese Lady, The Public Theater

Sven Ortel, Thoughts of a Colored Man

Outstanding Sound Design for a Play

Tyler Kieffer, Seven Deadly Sins, Tectonic Theater Project & Madison Wells Live

Hidenori Nakajo and Ryan Rumery, Autumn Royal, Irish Repertory Theatre

**Ben and Max Ringham, Cyrano de Bergerac, The Jamie Lloyd Company at Brooklyn Academy of Music

Mikaal Sulaiman, Sanctuary City, New York Theatre Workshop 

Lee Kinney, Selling Kabul, Playwrights Horizons

Outstanding Sound Design for a Musical

Ian Dickinson for Autograph, Company

Paul Gatehouse, Six

Kai Harada, Kimberly Akimbo,Atlantic Theater Company

**Gareth Owen, MJ

Outstanding Wig and Hair

Matthew B. Armentrout, Paradise Square

**David Brian Brown, Mrs. Doubtfire

Paul Huntley, Diana

Charles G. LaPointe, MJ

Outstanding Solo Performance
Alex Edelman, Just for Us, The Cherry Lane Theatre

Arturo Luís Soria, Ni Mi Madre, Rattlestick Playwrights Theater
**Kristina Wong, Kristina Wong, Sweatshop Overlord, New York Theatre Workshop

Unique Theatrical Experience

**Seven Deadly Sins, Tectonic Theater Project & Madison Wells Live

Outstanding Adaptation 

**Merry Wives, by Jocelyn Bioh, The Public Theater (Free Shakespeare in the Park)

The Alchemist, by Jeffrey Hatcher, Red Bull Theater

Outstanding Puppet Design

Amanda Villalobos, Wolf Play, Soho Rep.

**James Ortiz, The Skin of Our Teeth, Lincoln Center Theater

Rockefeller Productions, Winnie the Pooh, The Hundred Acre Theatre at Theatre Row

Harold S. Prince Lifetime Achievement Award

In four decades as playwright, novelist, actor, and director, Alice Childress (1912-1994) challenged racism with engrossing stories and memorable characters. When a New York producer demanded revisions to soften the impact of Trouble in Mind, after an initial run Off Broadway and prior to its Broadway debut, Childress withdrew the script. Sixty-five years later, the Drama Desk celebrates the long-delayed Broadway premiere of this timeless masterpiece and salutes Childress as a towering figure in contemporary theater history.

Ensemble Award

In Six, Adrianna Hicks, Andrea Macasaet, Brittney Mack, Abby Mueller, Samantha Pauly, and Anna Uzele bring to musical life the women who married England’s King Henry VIII. The fanciful result is a buoyant dramatization of their individually purposeful and collectively empowering journeys.

The Sam Norkin Off-Broadway Award

This season, as a woman hiding her brother from the Taliban in Sylvia Khoury’s Selling Kabul and an English instructor straddling two very different cultures in Sanaz Toossi’s English, Marjan Neshat embodied disparate characters so fully that it was hard to recognize the single actor in the two roles. Whether in drama or comedy, Neshat mines the playwright’s text for a vast panoply of emotions that yield vivid, intricate portrayals of the parts she undertakes.

Additional Special Awards

Dede Ayite seems to have costumed half the actors of this theater season with her designs for Merry Wives, Seven Deadly Sins, The Last of the Love Letters, Chicken and Biscuits, Slave Play, Nollywood Dreams, American Buffalo, and How I learned to Drive. Whether dressing working-class Marylanders of the 1960s, amateur criminals of the 1970s, or West African immigrants in today’s Harlem, Ayite has a knack for conveying characters’ means, values, and aspirations before the actors utter a word.

Adam Rigg enhanced storytelling through wildly varying scenic designs this season including: a house in wood, shadow, and reflective glass that draws the audience into the Flint, Michigan water crisis in Cullud Wattah; a community cul-de-sac where trauma and history are celebrated in On Sugarland; and the falling walls, flower-covered hillsides, and functional seaside fun ride of The Skin of Our Teeth.

With the category-defying Oratorio for Living Things, Heather Christian aims to encompass all human existence in a single inventive and startlingly beautiful work. In times of pandemic, war, and social upheaval, Christian’s work (directed by Lee Sunday Evans and brought to life by a superb cast and creative team) is an awe-inspiring reminder that, even in the darkest times, there will always be artistic peaks to scale.

Final tally of Awards

4 Wins

Clyde’s

Company

3 Wins

Flying Over Sunset

MJ

Prayer for the French Republic

Six: The Musical

2 Wins

Lackawanna Blues

Paradise Square

1 Win

A Strange Loop

Cyrano de Bergerac

Harmony

How I Learned to Drive

Kiimberly Akimbo

Kristina Wong: Sweatshop Overlord

Merry Wives

Mrs. Doubtfire

Sanctuary City

Seven Deadly Sins

Skeleton Crew

The Skin of Our Teeth

Tony Awards

A Strange Loop wins Best Musical as the Tony Awards return to Radio City Music Hall.

June 12, 2022:  The Tony Awards  returned to Radio City Music Hall for a live celebration of the 75th Annual event, the first since 2019, hosted by Oscar winner Ariana DeBose.


A Strange Loop 
wins Best Musical as the Tony Awards return to Radio City Music Hall.

June 12, 2022:  The Tony Awards  returned to Radio City Music Hall for a live celebration of the 75th Annual event, the first since 2019, hosted by Oscar winner Ariana DeBose.

A Strange Loop, already a Pulitzer Prize winner, won best musical, while The Lehman Trilogy won best play. Company won best revival of a musical and Take Me Out won the award for best revival of a play. The big winner of the evening, however, was the theater community and the theatergoers, who were celebrating a full season of diverse shows that inspired us all.

Tony Nominees and Winners:

Best Play
“Clyde’s”
“Hangmen”
WINNER: “The Lehman Trilogy”
“The Minutes”
“Skeleton Crew”

Best Musical
“Girl From The North Country”
“MJ”
“Mr. Saturday Night”
“Paradise Square”
“Six: The Musical”
WINNER: “A Strange Loop”

Best Revival of a Play
“American Buffalo”
“for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf”
“How I Learned to Drive”
WINNER: “Take Me Out”
“Trouble in Mind”

Best Revival of a Musical
“Caroline, or Change”
WINNER: “Company”
“The Music Man”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play
WINNER: Simon Russell Beale, “The Lehman Trilogy”
Adam Godley, “The Lehman Trilogy”
Adrian Lester, “The Lehman Trilogy”
David Morse, “How I Learned to Drive”
Sam Rockwell, “American Buffalo”
Ruben Santiago-Hudson, “Lackawanna Blues”
David Threlfall, “Hangmen”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play
Gabby Beans, “The Skin of Our Teeth”
LaChanze, “Trouble in Mind”
Ruth Negga, “Macbeth”
WINNER: Deirdre O’Connell, “Dana H.”
Mary-Louise Parker, “How I Learned to Drive”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical
Billy Crystal, “Mr. Saturday Night”
WINNER: Myles Frost, “MJ”
Hugh Jackman, “The Music Man”
Rob McClure, “Mrs. Doubtfire”
Jaquel Spivey, “A Strange Loop”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical
Sharon D Clarke, “Caroline, or Change”
Carmen Cusack, “Flying Over Sunset”
Sutton Foster, “The Music Man”
WINNER: Joaquina Kalukango, “Paradise Square”
Mare Winningham, “Girl From The North Country”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play
Alfie Allen, “Hangmen”
Chuck Cooper, “Trouble in Mind”
WINNER: Jesse Tyler Ferguson, “Take Me Out”
Ron Cephas Jones, “Clyde’s”
Michael Oberholtzer, “Take Me Out”
Jesse Williams, “Take Me Out”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play
Uzo Aduba, “Clyde’s”
Rachel Dratch, “POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive”
Kenita R. Miller, “for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf”
WINNER: Phylicia Rashad, “Skeleton Crew”
Julie White, “POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive”
Kara Young, “Clyde’s”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical
WINNER: Matt Doyle, “Company”
Sidney DuPont, “Paradise Square”
Jared Grimes, “Funny Girl”
John-Andrew Morrison, “A Strange Loop”
A.J. Shively, “Paradise Square”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical
Jeannette Bayardelle, “Girl From The North Country”
Shoshana Bean, “Mr. Saturday Night”
Jayne Houdyshell, “The Music Man”
L Morgan Lee, “A Strange Loop”
WINNER: Patti LuPone, “Company”
Jennifer Simard, “Company”

Best Direction of a Play
Lileana Blain-Cruz, “The Skin of Our Teeth”
Camille A. Brown, “for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf”
WINNER: Sam Mendes, “The Lehman Trilogy”
Neil Pepe, “American Buffalo”
Les Waters, “Dana H.”

Best Direction of a Musical
Stephen Brackett, “A Strange Loop”
WINNER: Marianne Elliott, “Company”
Conor McPherson, “Girl From The North Country”
Lucy Moss & Jamie Armitage, “Six: The Musical”
Christopher Wheeldon, “MJ”

Best Scenic Design of a Play
Beowulf Boritt, “POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive”
Michael Carnahan and Nicholas Hussong, “Skeleton Crew”
WINNER: Es Devlin, “The Lehman Trilogy”
Anna Fleischle, “Hangmen”
Scott Pask, “American Buffalo”
Adam Rigg, “The Skin of Our Teeth”

Best Scenic Design of a Musical
Beowulf Boritt and 59 Productions, “Flying Over Sunset”
WINNER: Bunny Christie, “Company”
Arnulfo Maldonado, “A Strange Loop”
Derek McLane and Peter Nigrini, “MJ”
Allen Moyer, “Paradise Square”

Best Book of a Musical
“Girl From The North Country”
Conor McPherson “MJ”
Lynn Nottage
“Mr. Saturday Night”
Billy Crystal, Lowell Ganz & Babaloo Mandel
“Paradise Square”
Christina Anderson, Craig Lucas & Larry Kirwan
WINNER: “A Strange Loop”
Michael R. Jackson

Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics)
“Flying Over Sunset”
Music: Tom Kitt Lyrics: Michael Korie
“Mr. Saturday Night”
Music: Jason Robert Brown Lyrics: Amanda Green
“Paradise Square”
Music: Jason Howland
Lyrics: Nathan Tysen & Masi Asare
WINNER: “Six: The Musical”
Music and Lyrics: Toby Marlow & Lucy Moss
“A Strange Loop”
Music & Lyrics: Michael R. Jackson

Best Costume Design of a Play
WINNER: Montana Levi Blanco, “The Skin of Our Teeth”
Sarafina Bush, “for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf”
Emilio Sosa, “Trouble in Mind”
Jane Greenwood, “Neil Simon’s Plaza Suite”
Jennifer Moeller, “Clyde’s”

Best Costume Design of a Musical

Fly Davis, “Caroline, or Change”

Toni-Leslie James, “Paradise Square”

William Ivey Long, Diana, The Musical

Santo Loquasto, “The Music Man”

WINNER: Gabriella Slade, “SIX: The Musical”

Paul Tazewell, “MJ”

Best Lighting Design of a Play
WINNER: Jon Clark, The Lehman Trilogy
Jane Cox, “Macbeth”
Yi Zhao, “The Skin of Our Teeth”
Joshua Carr, “Hangmen”
Jiyoun Chang, “for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf”

Best Lighting Design of a Musical
Neil Austin, “Company”
Tim Deiling, “Six: The Musical”
Donald Holder, “Paradise Square”
WINNER:Natasha Katz, “MJ”
Bradley King, Flying Over Sunset Jen Schriever, “A Strange Loop”

Best Sound Design of a Play
Justin Ellington, “for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf”
WINNER: Mikhail Fiksel, “Dana H.”
Palmer Hefferan, “The Skin of Our Teeth”
Nick Powell and Dominic Bilkey, “The Lehman Trilogy”
Mikaal Sulaiman, “Macbeth”

Best Sound Design of a Musical
Simon Baker, “Girl From The North Country”
Paul Gatehouse, “Six: The Musical”
Ian Dickinson for Autograph, “Company”
Drew Levy, “A Strange Loop”
WINNER: Gareth Owen, “MJ”

Best Choreography
Camille A. Brown, “for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf”
Warren Carlyle, “The Music Man”
Carrie-Anne Ingrouille, “Six: The Musical”
Bill T. Jones, “Paradise Square”
WINNER: Christopher Wheeldon, “MJ”

Best Orchestrations
David Cullen, “Company”
Tom Curran, “Six: The Musical”
WINNER: Simon Hale, “Girl From The North Country”
Jason Michael Webb and David Holcenberg, “MJ”
Charlie Rosen, “A Strange Loop”

Broadway Update

Broadway Update: Stoppard, Sesame Street, Good Night Oscar, Lena Horne, etc.

By: David Sheward

June 11, 2022: Lots of theater news to report: Tom Stoppard’s latest play Leopoldstadt has announced a theater and dates for its Broadway transfer after a critically acclaimed London production in 2020. The decade-spanning epic work about multiple generations of a Jewish-Catholic family in Vienna will begin previews at the Longacre Theatre on Sept. 14 in advance of an Oct. 2 opening. This will be Stoppard’s 19th play on Broadway since Rosencrantz and Guilderstern Are Dead opened in 1967. He has won four Best Play Tony Awards (for R & G Are Dead, Travesties, The Real Thing, and The Coast of Utopia.) Leopoldstadt won the Olivier Award for its London run but was stopped short by the COVID shutdown. It’s the first play in which the playwright uses his Jewish background as a source. 

Broadway Update: Stoppard, Sesame Street, Good Night Oscar, Lena Horne, etc.

By: David Sheward

June 11, 2022: Lots of theater news to report: Tom Stoppard’s latest play Leopoldstadt has announced a theater and dates for its Broadway transfer after a critically acclaimed London production in 2020. The decade-spanning epic work about multiple generations of a Jewish-Catholic family in Vienna will begin previews at the Longacre Theatre on Sept. 14 in advance of an Oct. 2 opening. This will be Stoppard’s 19th play on Broadway since Rosencrantz and Guilderstern Are Dead opened in 1967. He has won four Best Play Tony Awards (for R & G Are Dead, Travesties, The Real Thing, and The Coast of Utopia.) Leopoldstadt won the Olivier Award for its London run but was stopped short by the COVID shutdown. It’s the first play in which the playwright uses his Jewish background as a source. 

Also from London: Killing Eve star Jodie Comer will star in Suzie Miller’s one-person play Prime Facie, now in the West End, on Broadway in Spring 2023 at a Shubert theater to be announced. Previously presented in Sydney, Australia, Prime Facie focuses on a brilliant barrister coping with patriarchal power, burden of proof and morality. 

Ben Rappaport as Jack Paar and Sean Hayes as Oscar Levant
in Good Night, Oscar.
Credit: Liz Lauren

It’s not confirmed, but Emmy winner Sean Hayes has stated on his podcast that Good Night Oscar by Tony winner Doug Wright (I Am My Own Wife, War Paint) will be arriving on Broadway. Hayes starred in the title role, pianist-actor-humorist Oscar Levant, during a smash hit run at Chicago’s Goodman Theater. The play is set during an appearance by Levant on Jack Paar’s talk show and features Hayes brilliantly playing George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. Levant was a dry-witted comic, gifted composer and musician. He often played the sarcastic, deadpan best friend of the hero in such classic movie musicals as An American in Paris, The Barkleys of Broadway, Romance on the High Seas, and The Band Wagon.

Nanette Fabray, Oscar Levant, and Fred Astaire in The Band Wagon.

Meanwhile, Off-Broadway, a new musical version of the beloved PBS children’s series Sesame Street will begin preview performances on Sept. 8 at Theater Row in advance of a Sept. 22 opening for a limited run through Nov. 27. Elmo, Cookie Monster, The Count, Bert, Ernie, Oscar the Grouch and all the favorite muppets will be there along with special Broadway guests.

After all these openings, there have also been some closings. Dear Evan Hansen, Tina: The Tina Turner Musical, and Come from Away have all announced their final Broadway performances. There will probably be many more after the Tonys. If any show loses all their categories, a shuttering usually follows.

One show that will still be going strong win or lose at the Tonys is Six: The Musical at the Brooks Atkinson. The mock rock concert featuring the six wives of King Henry VIII is one of the big hits of the season. And its home will be getting a new name. The Atkinson will be rechristened the Lena Horne Theater. This will be the first time a Broadway theater will be named for an African-American woman. Horne won a special Tony in 1981 for her solo show Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music, and starred in the 1957 hit Jamaica.

Lena Horne (above); (top) Jodie Comer in Prime Facie. (Credit: Helen Murray)

2022-23 Broadway/Off-Broadway Schedule

June 12–Tony Awards (Radio City Music Hall)

June 14–Drama Desk Awards (Sardi’s)

June 16–Epiphany (LCT/Mitzi Newhouse)

June 20–Chita Rivera Awards (NYU Skirball)

June 22–Coriscana (Playwrights Horizons)

July 10–Into the Woods (St. James)

July 21–The Kite Runner (Hayes)

Aug. 25–Kinky Boots (Stage 42)

Summer 2022–Richard III; As You Like It (Delacorte)

Sept. 19–The Piano Lesson (St. James) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 19–Death of a Salesman (Hudson) (previews begin; opening TBA)

Sept. 22–Sesame Street: The Musical (Theater Row)

Oct. 2–Leopoldstadt (Longacre)

Oct. 11–Almost Famous (a Shubert theater TBA)

Nov. 10–Kimberly Akimbo (Booth)

Nov. 20–KPOP (Circle in the Square)

Dec. 4–A Beautiful Noise: The Neil Diamond Musical (Broadhurst)

Dec. 8–Camelot (Lincoln Center/Vivian Beaumont)

Dec. 11–Some Like It Hot (Shubert)

Fall 2022 (no dates yet)

1776 (Roundabout/AA)

Between Riverside and Crazy (Second Stage/Hayes)

the bandaged place (Roundabout/Underground)

Camp Siegfried (Second Stage/Tony Kiser)

Cost of Living (MTC/Friedman)

Summer, 1976 (MTC/City Center Stage II)

Where the Mountain Meets the Sea (MTC/City Center Stage I)

2022-23 (no dates or theaters yet)

Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death, Black Orpheus, Cinderella, Dancin’, The Ohio State Murders, Pal Joey, Square One

Winter 2022-23

The Wanderers (Roundabout/Laura Pels)

Spring 2023 

Prime Facie (a Shubert theater TBA)

The Thanksgiving Play (Second Stage/Hayes)

Poor Yella Rednecks (MTC/City Center Stage II)

2023 and Beyond

Game of Thrones, The Great Gatsby

Future–Good Night, Oscar; The Devil Wears Prada; The Karate Kid; Back to the Future; Our Town; The Nanny; The Normal Heart/The Destiny of Me; Smash; Soul Train; The Who’s Tommy

75th Tony Awards

For the Milestone 75th Annual Presentation, the Tony Awards Return to the New Normal and Are Putting On a Spectacular Four Hour Televised Event; Ariana DeBose is Hosting

By Ellis Nassour

June 10, 2022: For the milestone 75th Annual Presentation, the Tony Awards return to the new normal and are putting on a spectacular four hour televised celebration. The   Tony are back to New York’s legendary Showplace of the Nation Radio City Music Hall on Sunday in a TV event that will telecast live coast to coast for the first time.   

For the Milestone 75th Annual Presentation, the Tony Awards Return to the New Normal and Are Putting On a Spectacular Four Hour Televised Event; Ariana DeBose is Hosting

By Ellis Nassour

June 10, 2022: For the milestone 75th Annual Presentation, the Tony Awards return to the new normal and are putting on a spectacular four hour televised celebration. The   Tony are back to New York’s legendary Showplace of the Nation Radio City Music Hall on Sunday in a TV event that will telecast live coast to coast for the first time.   

It all begins at 7 P.M, Eastern/4 P.M. PT with The Tony Awards: Act One, an hour telecast on Paramount + hosted by Emmy-winning Darren Criss (American Buffalo revival) and Julianne Hough (POTUS…).  They’ll bestow multiple craft honors, special awards, and introduce special performances. 

The Tony Awards, Act Two begins at 8 P.M. Eastern/5 P.M. PT when the American Theatre Wing’s Tonys go live on CBS and streaming on Paramount +.  In quite a swift move, the Tonys have reall thought outside the box and chosen Ariana DeBose, the dazzling delight of Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story remake who won the Featured Actress Oscar for her Anita. She also received a 2018 Tony Featured nomination for her portrayal of Disco Donna in Summer: The Donna Summer Musical

Major highlights of the telecast will feature numbers from Tony Award-nominated musicals,  A Strange LoopGirl From the North CountryMJMr. Saturday NightThe Music ManParadise Square, and SIX; and, in celebration of Stephen Sondheim, the cast of Company will perform.

Also taking the stage will be Tony winners Bernadette Peters and Billy Porter, along with the New York City Gay Men’s Chorus. In addition, there will a reunion performance with the original cast members of the 2007 Tony-winner Spring Awakening.  

Tony Honors for Excellence in the Theatre being bestowed are a Lifetime Achievement Award to beloved audience favorite and three-time Oscar, five-time Tony winner  and 15 time Emmy nominated Angela Lansbury. In 2014, Ms. Lansbury received an Honorary Oscar as “an entertainment icon who has created some of cinema’s most memorable characters, inspiring generations of actors.”

The prestigious Isabelle Stevenson Award [honoring the late and longtime American Theatre Wing president] was award to Robert E. Wankel,  president and co-CEO, Shubert Organization. Other Tony Honors went to the United Scenic Artists, Local USA 829/IATSE; the Asian American Performers Action Coalition; Broadway for All music copyist Emily Grishman, the Broadway music preparer since 1992; and cabaret Feinstein’/54 Below for Excellence in the  Theater. 

The Tony and Carnegie Mellon University Educator Award went to Roshunda Jones-Koumba, G.W. Carver Magnet High School, Houston, Texas. In tribute, a student wrote:  “I’ve been in awe of her vision, tireless work ethic, countless hours, blood, sweat, tears, money, and food she’s given to her students … And she taught us usually black and brown kids that we could do anything.” 

Talk about a season of diversity! Talk about a season of dancing! There was plenty of drama and comedy, too; and more than a bit of trepidation among audience members if they were caught mask less – especially at the Company revival under the watchful eye of Patti LuPone. 

Welcomed back to Broadway were Hugh Jackman (after almost eight years to the day) and Sutton Foster (a long eight years); writer and two-time Pulitzer Prize honoree Lynn Nottage (almost five years) with two certainly diverse works (Clyde’s, MJ); andSNL veteran Rachel Dratch (POCTUS…) (after four years and for a much longer run). 

In addition to Ms. LuPone. other all-time favorites were back trodding the boards, including   Sarah Jessica (Plaza Suite) (absent since 1996) and as sparkling as ever; two-time Tony winner Matthew Broderick (Plaza Suite) (since 2015); and Billy Crystal (Mr. Saturday Night) (for the first time since 2013).  

2021-2022 also introduced very young talent: 28-year-old playwright Selina Fillinger (POTUS…); and 23-year-old actor in a leading role not soon to be forgotten, Jaquel Spivey (A Strange Loop), jumping from university to Broadway debut. [A bit reminiscent of Laura Benanti, only 18, leaving NYU classes behind and inheriting Maria in the 1998 The Sound of Music revival from Rebecca Luker. [Benanti went on to gather five Tony nominations and a win in 2008 as Featured Actress for the Gypsy revival – not to mention a later recurring role on late night TV hilariously portraying a certain First Lady.].

There was a huge roster of Broadway debuts thanks to Jerry Zaks and Warren Carlyle with 20-plus newcomers in The Music Man; and Lynn Nottage and Christopher Wheeldon who introduced 15- plus to the stage in MJ.

Remember the old M-G-M axiom: “More stars than there are in the heavens!” The 2022 Tonys on Sunday will boast a line-up of more stars than can fit on RCMH’s great stage. Check ‘em out: Utkarsh Ambudkar, Skylar Astin, Zach Braff, Danielle Brooks, Danny Burstein, Len Cariou, RuPaul Charles, Jessica Chastain, Lilli Cooper, Bryan Cranson,  Wilson Cruz, Colman Domingo, Anthony Edwards, Cynthia Erivo, Raúl Esparza, Laurence Fishburne, Andrew Garfield, Renée Elise Goldsberry, Tony Goldwin, David Alan Grier, Vanessa Hudgens, Jennifer Hudson, LaTanya Richardson Jackson, Samuel L. Jackson, Nathan Lane, Telly Leung, Judith Light, Josh Lucas, Gaten Matarazzo, Ruthie Ann Miles, Patina Miller, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Bebe Neuwirth, Kelli O’Hara, Sarah Paulson, Bernadette Peters, Jeremy Pope, Billy Porter, Chita Rivera, tony Shalhoub, Phillipa Soo, Sarah Silverman, George Takei, Aaron Tveit, Adrienne Warren, Patrick Wilson, and Bowen Yang. {Were you able to pick out previous Tony winners?}

After more than two years waging war against Covid variants, let’s not forget those we lost. They include producer and longtime chair/CEO of the Shubert Organization Philip J. Smith, Oscar-nominated/Emmy and Tony-winning Cicely Tyson, Tony-winning Christopher Plummer, Tony-winning director/writer/actor Douglas Turner Ward, the unforgettable soprano Rebecca Luker, costumer Anthony Powell, composer Jim Steinman, Olympia Dukakis, dancer/ choreographer Jacques d’Amboise, Tony-nominated Karla Burns, actress Lisa Banes, longtime Tony Awards music director Elliott Lawrence, Tony honoree Paul Huntley who designed wigs for over 250 Broadway shows, three-time Tony nominee Micki Grant, Ed Asner, Tony-winning prodigious producer Elizabeth I. McCann, Melvin Van Peebles, Oscar-winning and Tony-nominated composer Leslie Bricusse, Peter Scolari, playwright Ed Bullins, Pulitzer Prize and Tony-winning composer Stephen Sondheim, who left behind a legacy of brilliance; Tony nominee Anthony Sher, Tony-nominated actress/singer Sally Ann Howes, Tony-winning producer and theatre owner James M. Nederlander, casting director Jay Binder, Tony-winner Rae Allen Best Actor, Musical (How to Succeed…) and Best Actor, Tony-winner, Play (Tru) Robert Morse, dancer/choreographer Yuriko Kikuchi, dancer/Tony-nominated choreographer Sammy Dallas Bayes, and Ray Liotta. 

The Tonys have aired on CBS since 1978, and were first presented on network TV by ABC from 1967-1977. The 1968 the 21st annual Awards were hosted by Mary Martin and Robert Preston. They are produced in collaboration with Tony Award Productions, a joint venture of the  American Theatre Wing and Broadway League with White Cherry Entertainment. Ten-time Primetime Emmy winners for Tony telecasts Ricky Kirshner and Glenn Weiss are executive producers. Weiss will serve as the 2022 director. 

The American Theatre Wing’s Tony Awards are presented by The Broadway League and the American Theatre Wing. At The Broadway League, Lauren Reid is chair and Charlotte St. Martin is president. At the American Theatre Wing, Emilio Sosa is chair and Heather A. Hitchens is president and CEO. Ricky Kirshner and Glenn Weiss of White Cherry Entertainment are the executive producers of the 74th Annual Tony Awards. Weiss is also  directing the telecast. 

For more information, photo galleries, video, Awards history, a printable ballot, and an array of fun and entertaining content, visit www.TonyAwards.com. Follow the Tonys @TheTonyAwards and on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and TikTok. 

CBS Entertainment executive vice president, Specials, Music, Live Events and Alternative Programming, Jack Sussman, states, “We’re thrilled to bring the best of Broadway to television viewers who have been through so much without the joys, comfort and excitement that live theater provides. With the combination of  CBS-TV an Paramount+, the show will honor Tony Award nominees and winners in a format unlike any other, and celebrate the iconic music, memorable performances and unique personalities that make Broadway so special.”

Nomination Highlights, the 2022 American Theatre Wing’s Tony Awards

 In a season of some extraordinary performances it’s great that the Tonys expanded the acting and Musical categories.  

Play
Clyde’sbyLynn Nottage
Hangmen Martin McDonagh
The Lehman Trilogy – Stefano Massini
The Minutes
–  Tracy Letts
Skeleton CrewDominique Morisseau

Musical
Girl from the North Country (Music and lyrics by: Bob Dylan; lyrics; book by: Conor McPherson)
MJ  [Music and lyrics by Michael Jackson, numerous pop, rock, and soul artists]
Mr. Saturday Night 
Paradise Square 
SIX
A Strange Loop

Performance, Actor, Leading Role, Play
Simon Russell Beale – The Lehman Trilogy
Adam Godley – The Lehman Trilogy 
Adrian Lester (Broadway debut) – The Lehman Trilogy
David Morse – How I Learned to Drive 
Sam Rockwell – American Buffalo
Ruben Santiago-Hudson – Lackawanna Blues 
David Threlfall – Hangmen

Performance, Actress, Leading Role, Play
Gabby Beans (Broadway debut)  – The Skin of Our Teeth 
LaChanze – Trouble in Mind
Ruth Negga – Macbeth
Deirdre O’Connell – Dana H.
Mary-Louise Parker – How I Learned to Drive

Performance, Actor, Leading Role, Musical
Billy Crystal – Mr. Saturday Night 
Myles Frost (Broadway debut) – MJ
Hugh Jackman – The Music Man 
Rob McClure – Mrs. Doubtfire 
Jaquel Spivey (Broadway deubt) – A Strange Loop

Performance, Actress, Leading Role, Musical
Sharon D Clarke (Broadway debut) – Caroline, or Change
Carmen Cusack – Flying Over Sunset
Sutton Foster – The Music Man
Joaquina Kalukango – Paradise Square
Mare Winningham – Girl from the North Country

Performance, Actor, Featured Role, Play
Alfie Allen (Broadway debut) – Hangmen
Chuck Cooper – Trouble in Mind 
Jesse Tyler Ferguson – Take Me Out 
Ron Cephas Jones – Clyde’sMichael Oberholtzer – Take Me Out 
Jesse Williams (Broadway Debut) – Take Me Out

Performance, Actress, Featured Role, Play
Uzo Aduba – Clyde’s
Rachel Dratch – POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive 
Kenita R. Miller – for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf
Phylicia Rashad – Skeleton Crew
Julie White – POTUS: Or Behind Every Great Dumbass are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive
Kara Young (Broadway debut) – Clyde’s

Performance, Actor, Featured Role, Musical
Matt Doyle – Company
Sidney DuPont – Paradise Square
Jared Grimes – Funny Girl
John-Andrew Morrison (Broadway debut)  – A Strange Loop
 
A.J. Shively – Paradise Square

Performance, Actress, Featured Role, Musical
Jeannette Bayardelle – Girl From The North Country 
Shoshana Bean – Mr. Saturday Night
Jayne Houdyshell – The Music Man
L Morgan Lee (Broadway debut) – A Strange Loop
Patti LuPone – Company 
Jennifer Simard – Company 

Direction, Play
Lileana Blain-Cruz – The Skin of Our Teeth
Camille A. Brown – for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf 
Sam Mendes – The Lehman Trilogy
Neil Pepe – American Buffalo
Les Waters – Dana H.

Direction, Musical
Stephen Brackett – A Strange Loop
Marianne Elliott – Company
Conor McPherson – Girl from the North Country 
Lucy Moss  and Jamie Armitage – SIX 
Christopher Wheeldon – MJ

Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics), Written for the Theatre
Flying Over Sunset – Music by Tom Kitt; Lyrics by Michael Korie
Mr. Saturday Night – Music, Jason Robert Brown; Lyrics, Amanda Green
Paradise Square –Music, Jason Howland; Lyrics, Nathan Tysen and Masi Asare
SIXMusic and lyrics, Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss
A Strange LoopMusic and lyrics, Michael R. Jackson

Book, Musical
Girl from the North Country by Conor McPherson
MJLynn Nottage
Mr. Saturday Night – Billy Crystal, Lowell Ganz, and Babaloo Mandel
Paradise Square – Christina Anderson, Craig Lucas, and Larry Kirwan
A Strange Loop – Michael R. Jackson

Revival of a Play
American Buffalo by David Mamet
for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf  –
Ntozake Shange
How I Learned to Drive – Paula Vogel
Take Me Out – Richard Greenberg
Trouble in Mind – Alice Childress

Revival of a Musical
Caroline, or Change – Music by Jeanine Tesori; book and lyrics, Tony Kushner
Company – Music and lyrics, Stephen Sondheim; book, George Furth
The Music Man – Music and lyrics, Meredith Willson

Choreography
Camille A. Brown – for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf 
Warren Carlyle – The Music Man
Carrie-Anne Ingrouille – SIX
Bill T. Jones – Paradise Square
Christopher Wheeldon – MJ  

Visit www.TonyAwards.com for the complete list of nominations (Scenic Design, Play and  Musical; Costume Design, Play and Musical; Lighting Design, Play and  Musical; Sound Design, Play and Musical; and Orchestrations). 

2022-23 Tony & Drama Desk Predictions by David Sheward Click Here

Fat Ham **** Funny Girl **1/2

By: David Sheward

June 9, 2022: The premise sounds like a SNL sketch: Hamlet updated and set at a contentious African-American family’s barbecue. But James Ijames’ scintillating rift on Shakespeare’s greatest play doesn’t settle for easy laughs and obvious spoof. Fat Ham used the template of the Melancholy Dane’s tragedy as a jumping-off place for a bizarre, inventive, and complex portrait of parental expectations, youthful angst, toxic masculinity, the legacy of violence, and the quest for true identity. It’s easy to see why this meaty repast of a play won the 2022 Pulitzer Prize for Drama after a streamed production from the Wilma Theater in Philadelphia where Ijames is co-artistic director. It’s now enjoying a live Off-Broadway premiere at the Public Theater in a co-production with the National Black Theatre, and man, is it live!

By: David Sheward

June 9, 2022: The premise sounds like a SNL sketch: Hamlet updated and set at a contentious African-American family’s barbecue. But James Ijames’ scintillating rift on Shakespeare’s greatest play doesn’t settle for easy laughs and obvious spoof. Fat Ham used the template of the Melancholy Dane’s tragedy as a jumping-off place for a bizarre, inventive, and complex portrait of parental expectations, youthful angst, toxic masculinity, the legacy of violence, and the quest for true identity. It’s easy to see why this meaty repast of a play won the 2022 Pulitzer Prize for Drama after a streamed production from the Wilma Theater in Philadelphia where Ijames is co-artistic director. It’s now enjoying a live Off-Broadway premiere at the Public Theater in a co-production with the National Black Theatre, and man, is it live!

Benja Kay Thomas in Fat Ham.

Directed with zest by Saheem Ali and performed by a vital company of seven, Fat Ham sizzles on the grill like a rich roast of ideas. The Hamlet figure is Juicy, a black, queer, plus-sized loner, desperate to find his place after the death of his abusive father Pap and the marriage of his equally nasty uncle Rev to his explosive but loving mother Tedra. Instead of the castle in Elsinore, the kingdom is a barbecue restaurant. Rather than an education at Wittenberg, Juicy is studying for his degree in Human Resources online from Phoenix University. The play-within-a-play where the king’s treachery is revealed is replaced by a game of charades.  

As you can guess, there are additional parallels to the original, but Ijames doesn’t follow the Bard slavishly. Ophelia is now Opal, a teenage lesbian straining against her mother’s ideas of what a woman should be. Laertes is Larry, a Marine secretly in love with Juicy who sheds his uniform in spectacular fashion. Instead of a father figure like Polonius, we have Rabby, the mother of Opal and Larry, a religious and proper woman with a scarlet past. Horatio becomes Tio, a seemingly air headed dope smoker and porn addict with surprising sage advice for all. 

Billy Eugene Jones and Nikki Crawford in Fat Ham.

Ijames goes far beyond parody, shattering the fourth wall and brining the entire audience into this meta-world where class and sexuality merge and melt. Ali’s staging simultaneously acknowledges the play as a theatrical metaphor (Maruti Evans’ clever set reinforces this double vision of reality and two-dimensional illusion) and creates a believable family conflict. Juicy, Larry, Opal and Tio are rebelling against their elders’ idea of who they should be, even reaching out the audience for answers.  

The stellar cast also plays this dual perspective, existing in a theatrical construct and relating to each other truthfully. Marcel Spears captures Juicy’s roiling inner turmoil, balancing his need to be “soft” with his rage at the injustice dealt him. He’s also very funny, hitting Ijames’ jibes sharply and keeping melancholy from overwhelming the character. In the dual roles of Rev and Pap, Billy Eugene Jones is a double dynamo of evil. Nikki Crawford’s Tedra is irresistibly sexy and needy. Chris Herbie Holland’s Tio at first seems like a stereotypical goof-off, but gathers strength in a weird monologue about finding ecstasy in a surrealistic video game. Benja Kay Thomas is a delightfully buoyant Rabby, bringing out the spice behind her strictness. Adrianna Mitchell provides Opal with a steely backbone and a hilariously deadpan sarcasm. As Larry, Calvin Leon Smith soulfully embodies Larry’s struggle between his hard military shell and the delicate butterfly within. 

Without revealing too much of director Ali’s stunning finale, Evans’ set, Dominique Fawn Hill’s costumes, Stacey Derosier’s lighting, and Mikaal Sulaiman’s sound all come together for a spectacular celebration of theater and acceptance.

Jared Grimes, Eddie Ryan, Beanie Feldstein (Fanny Brice)
in  Funny Girl.

While the spirit of Shakespeare hovers over but does not smother Fat Ham, the specter of Barbra Streisand haunts and suffocates the new Funny Girl. I was finally able to take in the first revival of the 1964 bio-tuner of legendary comic Fanny Brice after many delays due to COVID outbreaks among the cast. Despite some tweaks by Harvey Fierstein to Isobel Lennart’s by-the-numbers, original book and a few fresh ideas from director Michael Mayer, Funny Girl remains a star vehicle requiring an outsized talent to drive it. Streisand was that kind of talent, surpassing the subject Brice in brilliance and versatility and she became a supernova in film and music as a result, never returning to Broadway.

Beanie Feldstein is a fun, joyful young performer who rates an A for effort, but she is not a once-in-a-century talent like Streisand. Her voice is serviceable but not strong enough to ride the bucking bronco of an Act One closer like “Don’t Rain on My Parade” or extract all the emotion of “People.” Most of the comic bits feel forced and the connection between her and Ramin Karimloo’s warm and virile Nick Arnstein is not strong enough to sustain the main plot arc of Fanny and Nick’s obsessive but ultimately doomed romance.    

Beanie Feldstein (Fanny Brice) and Ramin Karimloo (Nick Arnstein)
in Funny Girl

As noted, there are a few moments when the director and performers trust their own gifts and the show briefly shines. When Feldstein as a comically fake pregnant Brice in an elaborate Ziegfeld sequence, pushes a leggy chorine aside with “Get out of my way, Christine” there are genuine laughs because it seems like a spontaneous quip. “Rat-Tat-Tat-Tat” with Fannie as a cliched Jewish soldier festooned with bagels rather than bullets, is the only production number that entirely works. Feldstein cuts loose and actually has natural fun, the choreography by Ayodele Casel (tap) and Ellenore Scott is perfectly and effortlessly executed, and the schtick is hoary, but hilairous. Also any time Jared Grimes as Eddie Ryan dances, he stops the show. But Eddie should not be the center of attention in Funny Girl. Jane Lynch adds deadpan drollness as Fanny’s mother, Peter Francis James has dignity as Florenz Ziegfeld, and Beanie Feldstein deserves to headline a show where she is not expected to fill such gigantic shoes.

Fat Ham: May 26—July 3. Public Theater and the National Black Theater at the Public Theater, 425 Lafayette St., NYC. Tue—Fri 8pm; Sat—-Sun 2pm & 8pm. Running time: 95 minutes with no intermission. $60. www.publictheater.org.
Photography: Joan Marcus

Chris Herbie Holland, Adrianna Mitchell, Benja Kay Thomas, and Calvin Leon Smith iin Fat Ham.
Marcel Spears in Fat Ham.

Funny Girl: Opened April 24 for an open run. August Wilson Theatre, 245 W. 52nd St., NYC. Tue 7pm; Wed 2pm & 8pm; Thu 7pm; Fri 8pm; Sat 2pm & 8pm; Sun 3pm. Running time: two hours and 50 mins. including intermission. $67—$149. www.seatgeek.com
Photography: Mathew Murphy

Debra Cardona (Mrs. Meeker), Toni DiBuono (Mrs. Strakosh), Jane Lynch 
(Mrs. Rosie Brice), Jared Grimes (Eddie Ryan) in Funny Girl.
Ramin Karimloo (Nick Arnstein), Beanie Feldstein (Fanny Brice), Jared Grimes (Eddie Ryan)
in Funny Girl.