Around The Town

Steve Tyrell @ Cafe Carlyle

           "I’ll Take Romance” is filled with love the old fashioned way

                    By: Sandi Durell
The sexy, raspy jazz crooner, Steve Tyrell, continues to make love and romance very stylish – the old fashioned way. His recipe for romantic diversity is all contained in the Great American Songbook, a basketful of gems that warm our hearts and all those other little fibers of our being.

Multi Grammy Winner Tyrell never disappoints with his little boy smile and twinkle in his eye that says “I know just want you want and I’m here to give it to you.” His technique is so personalized; it’s as if he’s singing only to you.

           "I’ll Take Romance” is filled with love the old fashioned way

                    By: Sandi Durell
The sexy, raspy jazz crooner, Steve Tyrell, continues to make love and romance very stylish – the old fashioned way. His recipe for romantic diversity is all contained in the Great American Songbook, a basketful of gems that warm our hearts and all those other little fibers of our being.

Multi Grammy Winner Tyrell never disappoints with his little boy smile and twinkle in his eye that says “I know just want you want and I’m here to give it to you.” His technique is so personalized; it’s as if he’s singing only to you.

After admonishing a female fan as he opened with “The Look of Love,” adding a lyric, don’t ever text (“don’t ever go”) – – he continued to pay tribute to Burt Bacharach and Hal David with “This Guy’s in Love With You” and “I Say a Little Prayer” on the occasion of their receiving the 3rd ever Gershwin Award.

This show coincides with his latest CD “I’ll Take Romance,” his 9th offering. His easy going style is supported by some unique arrangements on the tried and true, like the bossa styling on Cole Porter’s “All of You” or the swingin’ Rodgers and Hart “Isn’t It Romantic,” thanks to Bob Mann (guitar).

In between there are a few old jokes preceding songs like “Come Rain or Come Shine” (the gangster whose boss wants to hear the song and his henchman who eventually says sing both of them), and the nostalgia of hearing Mom and Dad’s favorite “(I Love You For) Sentimental Reasons” (William Best and Deek Watson).

There were a few surprises, or as Tyrell puts it “a gift to all” – a never recorded Sammy Cahn/Artie Butler song, the last one Cahn wrote “You Must Be Crazy.”  He included “I Wonder” (Cecil Gant) a song that Louis Armstrong recorded when he was 19.

The Sinatra big band stylings were ever present with “Bewitched, Bothered & Bewildered,” Fly Me to the Moon” and Sinatra’s most recorded song, “Night and Day,” all preceded by some great old stories about Sinatra when he was a singing waiter just over the bridge at the Rustic Cabin in New Jersey.

As the ultimate ‘wedding singer,’ Tyrell encored with the iconic “At Last” – the promise of tomorrow always.

His top-notch musicians shine individually, especially Lew Soloff on trumpet, along with Kevin Winard on drums, David Finck on bass, Jon Allen, keyboards/percussion and the incomparable Quinn Johnson, piano and musical director.
Photo: Stephen Sorokoff
Steve Tyrell appears at the Café Carlyle www.cafecarlyle.com thru May 26th
212 744-1600

Follow Theaterlife.com on Facebook