Reviews

Death of a Salesman ****

Rob DiSario, David-Manis, Carolyn Popp, Scott-T.-Hinson

Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor presents Death of a Salesman

Arthur Miller’s Pulitzer Prize winning drama Death of a Salesman opened at Bay Street Theater as part of their ongoing annual Literature Live productions. The powerful play intensely directed by Joe Minutillo is arguably one of the greatest of the 20th century. Set in the late 1940’s the story focuses on the Loman family’s struggle with financial insecurity and their illusions just after World War II. Although Miller wrote the play in 1949 it feels equally relevant today as Americans face declining opportunities to achieve their dreams.

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Around The Town

Legs Diamond @ 54 Below

Peter Allen (far right) and the company of the Original 1988-89 Broadway Production of “Legs Diamond”

The Original Broadway Cast  INCLUDING CHRISTINE ANDREAS, BRENDA BRAXTON, BOB STILLMAN  and more in 
LEGS DIAMOND 30TH ANNIVERSARY REUNION CONCERT  

FEINSTEIN’S/54 BELOW (254 West 54 Street NYC), Broadway’s Supper Club, presents the Original Broadway cast of the much heralded musical in Legs Diamond 30th Anniversary Reunion Concert on Sunday, December 3 at 7:00 pm and 9:30 pm.

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Around The Town

Anyone Can Fly

Faith Ringgold, Vaughn Bergen

16th Annual Exhibition & Silent Auction hosted by ACA Galleries

November 8, 2017:  The 16th Annual Anyone Can Fly exhibition and silent auction hosted by ACA Galleries at Affirmation Arts, 523 West 37th Street, featured a remarkable selection of art at the silent auction. Selected works were posted online for preview and early bidding prior to the event. Music at the festive evening was by the Jazz Doctors starring M.C. Joe Camardo. Dancing to the trio’s vivacious tunes  followed the auction.

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Gordin's View

Death of a Salesman

Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor presents Death of a Salesman

November 11, 2017:  Arthur Miller’s Pulitzer Prize winning drama Death of a Salesman opened at Bay Street Theater as part of their ongoing annual Literature Live productions. The powerful play directed by Joe Minutillo is arguably one of the greatest of the 20th century. Set in the late 1940’s the story focuses on the Loman family’s struggle with financial insecurity just after World War II, and although Miller wrote the play in 1949 it feels equally relevant today as Americans face declining opportunities to achieve their dreams.  

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Reviews

Friends! the Musical Parody ****

By: Iris Wiener

Could this musical BE any more fun? Nope. Friends, the hit NBC show of ten years, is ripe for riffing, and who better to take it on than parody masterminds Tobly and Bob McSmith, the clever writers behind Showgirls! The Musical! and Bayside! The Musical!? Whether you’ve simply caught the sitcom in reruns or you have pined for the day when Ross and Rachel would finally get together, this musical is a hysterical send-up of all that you loved to hate (or hated to love) about the 90s, and the cheese-filled archetypical tropes that defined comedic television.

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Reviews

What We’re Up Against ***

Krysta Rodriguez, Marg Helgenberger

What We’re Up Against By Theresa Rebeck Directed by Adrienne Campbell-Holt @ WP Theater through Nov. 26, 2017

By: Lauren Yarger

In the workplace, employees have to watch out for sexual harassment. A simple phrase might be taken the wrong way. The twist here, is that the employee lamenting the state of things is a male — and the boss — who says men having to deal with women in the office is just part of What We’re Up Against in this all-too-timely, darkly humorous play from Theresa Rebeck at WP Theater (formerly the Women’s Project.)

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Reviews

The Last Match ****

Wilson Bethel, Alex Mickiewicz

By: Isa Goldberg

Watching the two super heroes of tennis battling it out at the US Open in Anna Ziegler’s new play, The Last Match, is invigorating, indeed.

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Around The Town

Drama League Gala

Steve Martin

The Drama League Winter Benefit Gala honored Steve Martin at the Plaza

By: Patrick Christiano

November 6, 2017: Some of Broadway and Hollywood’s brightest stars applauded Steve Martin, a true renaissance man, at The Plaza, where The Drama League honored him on Monday evening. The League’s 34th Annual Musical Celebration was a vivid reminder of Mr. Martin’s immense talents as not only a successful actor, and comedian, but also a writer, producer, and musician. The man, who plays the piano and the banjo, is a renowned celebrity and yet he retains the goofy down to earth demeanor, which brought him to prominence on The Smothers Brother Comedy Hour in the 1960s. 

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Around The Town

Only Make Believe

Josh Groban

By: Iris Wiener

November 6th was a celebration of the magic of theatre, as the Broadway community came out to support Only Make Believe at its annual gala. OMB is a non-profit organization that creates and performs interactive theatre for children in hospitals and care facilities. The organization, which has served over 52,000 children since 1999, honored singer and new Broadway star Josh Groban for his philanthropic work with Find Your Life Foundation.

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Around The Town

Housewives of Secaucus

Housewives of Secaucus – A Suburban Travesty Spins Off in NYC

By: Paulanne Simmons

Back in 2012, when The Real Housewives franchise was at its height, playwright, actress and producer Nancy Levine saw an opportunity. Her company, Laugh Out Loud Productions, had been producing shows for seniors, called “luncheon shows,” for a while, and she needed a new play. 

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Reviews

Lonely Planet ****

Arnie Burton, Matt McGrath

By: Iris Wiener

Lonely Planet is a title apropos of Keen Company’s brilliant production, currently running at Harold Clurman Theater at Theatre Row. While Broadway plays are almost non-existent and much of Off-Broadway features political themes and social commentaries, Steven Dietz’s piece is an emotional touchstone harkening back to a time when America was facing a crisis of magnanimous proportions with the AIDS epidemic. That being said, Lonely Planet’s execution is distinct in its subtlety and powerful because of it.

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Reviews

People, Places & Things ****

Denise Gough & Company in People, Places & Things Photo: Joann Persson

By: Isa Goldberg

Given our nationwide opioid epidemic, there is no more pertinent a production on stage right now than the British import, People, Places & Things at St Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn, through November 19th. That does not mean that Donald Trump will see it, though in fact, he should.

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Reviews

This One’s for the Girls ***

Haley Swindal, Traci Bair, Jana Robbins, Aneesa Folds

Lively musical by Dorothy Marcic, creator of Sistas, opens at St. Luke’s Theatre.

By: Patrick Christiano

 October 27, 2017:  The amusing new musical This One’s for the Girls by Dorothy Marcic and directed by Tamara Kangas Erickson is a series of witty snapshots chronicling celebrated archetypical women’s role models from the past century in song. The revue, which opened Off- Broadway at St. Luke’s Theatre, 308 West 46 Street, takes a sassy jaunt down the memory lane of the women’s movement with chart topping hits from the past 100 years to punctuate memorable strides by women.

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Reviews

People, Places, and Things *****

Denise Gough, Barbara Marten

By: David Sheward

The first 20 minutes of Duncan MacMillan’s People, Places, and Things at St. Ann’s Warehouse after a smash-hit London engagement, display the most bracing collaboration of playwright, actors, director, and designers in recent theatrical memory. At first, it appears we are watching the final act of a revival of Chekhov’s The Seagull. But the actress playing Nina seems a bit unsteady on her feet. She is slurring her words and lurching as she moves. She slips and asks the actor playing Constantine if he remembers shooting a seagull and laying at her feet “earlier in the play.” She catches herself, realizing she has broken the performance’s delicate fabric of illusion and then does so literally by ripping down a gauzy back curtain. Immediately James Farncombe’s jagged lighting design and Tom Gibbons’ heart-throbbing soundscape explode, attacking our senses as Bunny Christie’s stark-white, hospital-like set shifts into several different locales at once. With shattering precision director Jeremy Herrin choreographs the actress’s subsequent smash-up. 

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