Reviews

Opus 18

At Primary Stages there’s a string quartet. Let’s start again. It’s a story about a fictional string quartet performing Beethoven’s OPUS 131, a radical piece for its time, since it redefined the structure of the string quartet as a form.

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Reviews

33 To Nothing

Playwright/actor/songwriter Grant James Vargas plays a self loathing lead singer for a rock band in his new musical, 33 to Nothing, being presented as the first offering of the Wild Project in their sleekly renovated East Village Theater, formerly known as the Bottle Factory. 33 to Nothing chronicles a band’s turbulent rehearsal as they prepare for what will ultimately be their final gig. Although the evening often works as clever entertainment, especially the group’s performance of the songs, the concept seems to exist merely as an excuse to showcase the Vargas music and market the CD. Incidentally, Vargas wrote all the songs, except “Lost to Me,” which he co-wrote with John Good and Preston Clark.

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Reviews

Midsummer Night’s Dream

Veteran Broadway director Daniel Sullivan has helmed a broadly comic production of Midsummer Night’s Dream, the second and final installment of Joseph Papp’s Shakespeare in the Park at the Delacorte Theater. The often produced romantic comedy in which the course of true love never runs smooth is a magical tale and directors over the years have often emphasized the dreamlike qualities inherent in the story, but Mr. Sullivan has given us a fast and furious staging that stresses the comedic aspects. His Midsummer Night’s Dream is a screwball comedy filled with an assortment of hilarious tricks that underscore many moments with extremely silly behavior that is often a raucous delight. The evening, however, despite all the calculated shenanigans is wildly uneven. Many of the mysteries of love, which are alluded to in the play, are glossed over as the complexities of that glorious emotion are left unexplored.

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Interviews

Charles Busch

In a Suspense Thriller at Bay Street

The legend Charles Busch is bringing his particular form of zany theatrical magic to the Bay Street Theater MainStage in a revival of his much acclaimed 1989 satire The Lady in Question, which begins previews on August 14 and will run through September 2.

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Reviews

Masked

Who’s going to kill whom? Suspense brings a surprise element to MASKED, a drama about three Palestinian brothers staged on a single set – the back room of a butcher shop where the blood is already splattered against the wall.

The fourth and youngest brother was the first sacrifice, shot by the Israeli army during an uprising. Now Khalid lives at home to take care of the boy who is nothing but a vegetable while Daoud commutes to Tel Aviv to support them, his wife and baby. When middle brother Na’im returns from the mountains, Khalid embraces him. The older brother he admires is a rising star in a Palestinian militia group much like Hamas. As portrayed by Arian Moayed, he is an angry young man, striking, virulent and as we watch him in this back room, he’s caged.

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Reviews

Dirt

Really engrossing theater is popping up in New York. Some of it the offshoot of numerous summer festivals – The Midtown Festival, Summer Shorts, along with the diverse international festival at Lincoln Center.

The Fringe Festival with a series of productions from around the world brings us DIRT. The most frequently performed solo show in Austria arrives here in English translation, performed by a startling          young actor whose name Christopher Domig, will not remain unknown for long. Watching Domig in DIRT brings to mind a young Dustin Hoffman or Al Pacino when they were just starting off Broadway.        

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Reviews

Gone Missing

Photo: Sheldon Noland

For lighthearted fare, don’t miss GONE MISSING a little musical running downtown at The Barrow Street Theatre, an ode to lost items – rings, car keys, blackberries, loved ones, you name it. Performed by a sextet comprised of three men and three women, MISSING is mostly charming as it delves into our ability to obsess over things. The material here is culled from real life interviews.

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Features

The Lady In Question

Photo: David Rogers

Drag legend extraordinaire Charles Busch is making a return engagement to the Bay Street Theater MainStage in a revival of his much acclaimed satire The Lady in Question, which begins previews on August 14 and will run through September 2. Mr. Busch was last seen here during the summer of 2004 in a revival of Auntie Mame on the MainStage, when he played another legend Mame Dennis, made famous by yet another legend, the film and theater star Rosalind Russell. Christopher Ashley, who helmed the current Broadway hit Xanadu, will direct Lady. He also directed the outstanding Broadway productions of All Shook Up and the revival of The Rocky Horror Picture Show earning a Tony nomination in the process.

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Reviews

Sessions

Photo: Joan Marcus

Talk about malady, here’s a musical review without a single compelling note. SESSIONS with book music and lyrics by Albert Tapper is built around a psychotherapist and his patients who we meet primarily in group therapy. While the story is supposed to draw us into their human experience, it only latches on to issues that are both obvious and predictable. As musical theater goes, this is the stuff of amateurs.

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Photos

“Company” Opening Night

Photography: Barry Gordin

Raul Esparza, Playwright Tricia Walsh Smith
Fred Rappaport, Michelle Lee
Anastasia Barzee, Tricia Walsh Smith
Raul Esparza
Fred Rosen
Philip Smith (President of The Shubert Organization), Kelly Jeanne Grant
Director John Doyle
Elizabeth Stanley, Kelly Jeanne Grant, Raul Esparza, Leenya Rideout , Heather Laws , Angel Desai

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Reviews

Eurydice

Photo: Joan Marcus

Imagine the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice as a modern day tale like this. Eurydice, played by Maria Dizzia arrives in Hades after falling from the penthouse apartment of a rich older man, a snake of a character portrayed by Mark Zeisler. Wearing a proper pink suit, carrying a suitcase and umbrella she travels on to the land of the dead. And what trumpets her arrival? Not the sonorous notes of her beloved Orpheus, but the clatter of tin pans created by sound designer Bray Poor.

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Reviews

Absinthe

Low. Very low. The lowest of the low, as in burlesque. ABSINTHE in the Spiegeltent by The South Street Seaport evokes German cabaret of the 30’s & 40’s as though it were iPod music with an ear to the taste of today’s busy urban professionals.

As the lead singer, a cross dresser and female impersonator Paul Capsis says early in the show “Marlene let me be your personal iPhone.” Besides Miss Dietrich and Janis Joplin, he does a Judy Garland imitation in which he takes the hand of an audience member. The night I attended it just happened to be the gossip columnist Cindy Adams. He looked deeply into the octogenarian’s surgically enhanced eyes and remarked in a drunken haze, “Liza, it’s Mama. We look more and more alike every day.”

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