Features

FSLC “Scary Movies”

FSLC Trick and Treats Horror Movie Fans with Halloween Season’s Ninth Edition of Scary Movies

             By: Ellis Nassour

Gather together fright film fans and take a haunted hayride [or metro] to Film Society of Lincoln Center’s ninth annual edition of Scary Movies October 30 – November 5 at the Center’s Lincoln Center campus: The Walter Reade Theatre and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center. This year’s horror fest features a line-up of special guests and showcases 12 of the best in new horror titles of all stripes from Australia, Denmark, Iceland, Ireland, Puerto Rico, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the U.S.: classic blood-thirsty thrillers, and genre rarities.

FSLC Trick and Treats Horror Movie Fans with Halloween Season’s Ninth Edition of Scary Movies

             By: Ellis Nassour

Gather together fright film fans and take a haunted hayride [or metro] to Film Society of Lincoln Center’s ninth annual edition of Scary Movies October 30 – November 5 at the Center’s Lincoln Center campus: The Walter Reade Theatre and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center. This year’s horror fest features a line-up of special guests and showcases 12 of the best in new horror titles of all stripes from Australia, Denmark, Iceland, Ireland, Puerto Rico, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the U.S.: classic blood-thirsty thrillers, and genre rarities.

October 30’s opening night attraction at 7:30 is the NY premiere Southbound, (MPI), "the mind-bending, knock-down drag-out road movie that puts the pedal to the metal as it speeds down a lost highway to hell with five separate but neatly connected stories of terror and menace." It’s from some of the key players behind the 2012 classic V/H/S: David Bruckner, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, Ti West, and Adam Wingarad – the writers/directors known as Radio Silence. Roxanne Benjamin and Patrick Horvath co-star abetted by the voice of Larry Fessenden as the radio DJ.

The film will be followed by a blow-out Halloween mischief might monster bash with prizes awarded audience members dressed as their favorite villain. There’ll be treats and beverages served.

On Halloween at Noon as part of Lincoln Center’s campus-wide Halloween celebration for kids, there’ll be a free screening in the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater of the James Whale’s 1931 B&W adaptation of the play by Peggy Webling, which is based on Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein (Universal), starring Boris Karloff and top-drawer actors of the period: Colin Clive, Mae Clarke, and John Boles.

This much-copied iconic classic of the mad scientist and his creation who creates a monster with a criminal brain has gone down in cinema history for Karloff’s often touching performance, John Pierce’s groundbreaking makeup, and several stunning sequences – including one that’s alternately poignant and horrific: The creature’s meeting with the young girl by a lake where they engage in a game tossing flowers and are mesmerized as they float away. The incident ends badly, however.

Arrive early. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis and limited. Some sequences are quite intense and not for children under eight.

Among the eagerly-anticipated November 1 revival screenings: at 1 P.M., Terence Fisher’s The Gorgon (Hammer), a 35mm screening of the 1964 gem starring Christopher Lee, actually a good guy here, and Peter Cushing and which introduces one of the most memorable monsters from Greek mythology to turn-of-the-century Europe. Then at 3:30 there’s Juan Piquer Simón’s ’80s cult classics Pieces, which segues from toys, one very naughty, to a black-gloved killer chain-sawing coeds across a college campus; and Slugs, which is set in a small New England town (shot in Spain) which is beset by a plague of carnivorous slugs. Everyman hero Mike Brady comes to the rescue.

At 7 P.M., there’s Sean Byrne’s The Devil’s Candy, (DCP), his eagerly anticipated follow-up to The Loved Ones, perhaps the most satisfying horror film of the last decade-but it will come to no genre fan’s surprise that his follow-up has been worth the wait. A captivatingly intense and nearly unrecognizable Ethan Embry stars as an artist struggling to support his wife (Shiri Appleby) and preteen daughter. A fight for survival begins when the tight-knit family moves into a new house, unaware that its previous occupant, a disturbed child-killer with demonic voices swirling in his head, wants his home back.

That night at 9 P.M. is horror of the most jarring, edge-of-your-seat kind, Nick Robertson’s "gut-wrenching feral-dog thriller" The Pack, featuring killer canines
preying on a family of four.

November 3 at 7 P.M. audiences will get a taste of Larry Fessenden’s distinctive brand of unnerving, mood-driven horror with his "crowning glory" The Last Winter (IFC). Set at an isolated Alaskan base near the Arctic Circle, an eco scientist (James Le Gros) and a roughneck oil boss (Ron Perlman) butt heads over the environmental impact of exploratory drilling project, until they discover something very strange is "out there." A Q&A with Fessenden and special guests follows.

On closing night November 5, at 7 P.M. there’s Bernard Rose’s new adaptation of Frankenstein, "a wildly original update with heart and gore set on the streets of L.A. A Q&A with Rose follows.

At 9:30, Rose will introduce his highly inventive, visual dream of a film Paperhouse (1988), adapted from Catherine Storr’s novel Marianne Dreams. It focuses on an impetuous, sickly 11-year old girl (Charlotte Burke in her only film) lost in the loneliness and boredom of reality who finds solace in an ill boy, whom she can visit in the alternate world of her drawings. It features Mike Southon’s lush cinematography and a beautifully atmospheric score by Hans Zimmer and Stanley Meyers. Paperhouse has never been released on U.S. DVD, so this is a rare opportunity to see it unreel in 35mm onscreen.

Scary Movies is programmed by Laura Kern, Rufus de Rham, and Gavin Smith.

FSLC receives generous support from American Airlines, The New York Times, HBO, Stella Artois, The Kobal Collection, Variety, Trump International Hotel and Tower, RowNYC, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

Scary Movies 9 tickets are $14; $11 for students and seniors (62+); and $9 for Film Society members. Save with the All Access Pass or 3+ films discount package. Visit filmlinc.org for the complete line-up, with creatives listings full descriptions.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AN TWITTER