Around The Town

Film Society/MoMA

Film Society/MoMA’s 44th Annual New Directors/New Films Series in Last Week

                                              By: Ellis Nassour
For 44 years the Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Museum of Modern Art’s New Directors/New Films series, dedicated to the discovery of new works by emerging filmmakers, has been a rite of spring, bringing exciting discoveries from around the world to adventurous moviegoers. The final week of the series ends March 29. There are four to eight screenings daily. Many selections are North American and U.S. Premieres.

Thrillers, comedy, drama, documentaries, and shorts are among the 23 remaining films, many with two showings, along with programs of shorts. Many showings have Q&As with creative teams.

Film Society/MoMA’s 44th Annual New Directors/New Films Series in Last Week

                                              By: Ellis Nassour
For 44 years the Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Museum of Modern Art’s New Directors/New Films series, dedicated to the discovery of new works by emerging filmmakers, has been a rite of spring, bringing exciting discoveries from around the world to adventurous moviegoers. The final week of the series ends March 29. There are four to eight screenings daily. Many selections are North American and U.S. Premieres.

Thrillers, comedy, drama, documentaries, and shorts are among the 23 remaining films, many with two showings, along with programs of shorts. Many showings have Q&As with creative teams.

There’ll be two screenings of the Closing Night attraction, Entertainment (USA), directed and co-written by Rick Alverson, who reteams with the star of his 2013 breakthrough film The Comedy, Tim Heidecker, for this hallucinatory journey that scrambles audiences’ sense of what’s funny-and what’s not. Cult anti-comedian Gregg Turkington (a.k.a. Neil Hamburger) stars as a washed-up comic working his way across the Mojave Desert to a possible reconciliation with his estranged daughter. Turkington delivers a blistering stand-up set as an abrasive assault on audiences. Alverson uses a slew of surrealist flourishes and poetic non sequiturs to fashion this odyssey that’s by turns mortifying, beautiful, bewildering, and absorbing. Michael Cera, John C. Reilly, Amy Seimetz, and Dean Stockwell are featured.

Venues are the Film Society’s Walter Reade and Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center on the Lincoln Center campus; and MoMA. Admission is $20 general public for the Opening, Centerpiece, and Closing nights; otherwise $15 general public, $12 FSLC and MoMA members. Save 15% for three or more films. Purchase at www.filmlinc.com [service fees apply] and the Reade box office. For complete rosters of films, dates, and showtimes, visit website.

New Directors/New Films is supported by Kenneth Kuchin, MoMA’s Junior Associates, FSLC’s New Wave, The New York Times, American Airlines, and Stella Artois.

Another Big Series Coming Soon: Art of the Real 2015, April 10-26

The second annual Art of the Real is a documentary showcase with a variety of genres alongside retrospectives. Highlights of the series include Q&As with creatives and a tribute to French director Agnès Varda.

Opening Night will host a mix of world shorts, featuring the U.S. premiere of João Pedro Rodrigues and João Rui Guerra da Mata’s Iec Long, the U.S. premiere of Argentinian director Eduardo Williams’s I Forgot, and the North American Premiere of Matt Porterfield’s Take What You Can Carry.

Jenni Olson’s poetic The Royal Road, fresh from its world premiere at Sundance, has been selected for Closing Night – paired with two new Mark Rappaport shorts. The feature has been described as meditation on love, remembrance, and California history structured around a trip down El Camino Real.

Art of the Real boasts a slew of North American premieres from notable filmmakers, including Nicolás Videla and Camila José Donoso with Naomi Campbel, not about the supermodel with a different last name spelling but a transgender woman struggling to finance a sex-change operation; Alain Cavalier’s enigmatic study of domesticity Le Paradis, shot on digital video in his home and voted one of the 10 best films of 2014 by Cahiers du Cinéma; a restored version of Ron Peck’s groundbreaking, rarely screened debut Nighthawks, which turns the spotlight on London’s 70s underground gay scene; and the late Derek Jarman’s "haunting, transfixing" Will You Dance with Me?, shot one night at an East London gay bar.

FSLC receives series support from Video Data Bank, Cinematheque Française, Institut Français, the French Embassy, BFI National Archive, Austrian Film Museum, and the Andrea Rosen Gallery.

Venues will be the Film Society’s Walter Reade and Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center on the Lincoln Center campus. Admission is $13 general public, $9 students and seniors, and $8 FSLC members. Save 15% for three or more films. Purchase as above. For complete rosters of films, dates, and showtimes, visit website.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK