The Seagull

Ian Rickson’s wonderful production of Anton Chekhov’s classic The Seagull starring a marvelous Kristin Scott Thomas as the tempestuous Russian actress Arkadina, is never less than entertaining and often much more. Working with a new modern translation by Christopher Hampton, Rickson’s Seagull originally debuted at the Royal Court Theatre in London, where it was a heralded success.

 

 

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Desir

Spiegelworld 2008 returns to the South Street Seaport for its third annual carnival with the world premier of Desir, an audacious new circus experience performed in an intimate cabaret like setting on a small round stage barely twenty-five feet in diameter. Patrons in the first four or five rows are right on top of the non stop action. Inspired by the adventurers of early 20th century Paris, the seductive Desir takes us backstage to one of the greatest nightclubs in the world for a Moulin Rouge-like revue of beguiling aerial and acrobatic acts from all over the world.

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The First Breeze Of Summer

The Signature Theater Company’s terrific production of Leslie Lee’s The First Breeze of Summer launches their 2008/2009 season dedicated to the historic Negro Ensemble Company, a fertile home for African-Americans writers and actors for decades. Nicely directed by the esteemed Ruben Santiago-Hudson the touching revival of Leslie Lee’s ambitious pot boiler features a skilled ensemble headed by the impressive Leslie Uggams. She portrays Gremmar Edwards, the matriarch at the center of the well crafted tale about three generations of a middle class African/American family living in a small suburb of Philadelphia.

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Edward Albee’s Occupant

Playwright Edward Albee has given us an indelible portrait of his good friend the artist Louise Nevelson in his 2001 play, Edward Albee’s Occupant, now making its delayed New York premier for the Signature Theatre Company. Starring the formidable Mercedes Ruehl, the two character play is a touching celebration of the determination (or is it destiny?) of his friend of many years, who just happened to be one of the most renowned sculptors of the 20th century.

 

 

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The Marriage of Bette & Boo

The Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of Christopher Durang’s scathingly funny The Marriage of Bette and Boo is the first New York presentation since the play debuted at the Public in 1985, when the word dysfunctional was barely a part of our vernacular. Walter Bobbie puts a solid ensemble through their paces in a consistently amusing broad staging of the playwright’s dark comedy that deals with stillborn babies, alcoholism, emotional abuse and cancer.

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Les Liaisons Dangereuses

Film star Laura Linney is returning to the Broadway stage in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s stylish revival of Christopher Hampton’s brilliant Les Liaisons Dangereuses. The British actor Ben Daniels stars opposite her as one half of the depraved duo that will wreck havoc with others’ lives in pursuit of their own selfish pleasures. The dark comedy, a scathing dissection of the cynicism and decadence of the pre-Revolutionary French aristocracy, is handsomely staged by Rufus Norris. His solid production is an excellent reminder of the malicious delights of Hampton’s take on the decay of French society.

 

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Cirque Dreams Jungle Fantasy

If you are looking for a Broadway show for the entire family, Cirque Dreams Jungle Fantasy, now playing a 10-week summer engagement, may be just the ticket. The evening is a colorful collection of musical numbers, where many of the talented acrobats and gymnasts dress up like animals from the jungle. Creator/director Neil Goldberg has spawned a jungle adventure themed musical, with songs by Jill Winters that have a driving disco beat to keep things lively. Although the outstanding routines, mostly acrobatic or aerial balancing acts are more than competent, the show lacks a needed spark of inventiveness.

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The Country Girl

The Mike Nichols revival of Clifford Odets’s 1950 play “The Country Girl” headed by two Oscar winning movie stars and a popular film/television actor has been the subject of much speculation along the rialto. Most of the gossip has focused on Morgan Freeman’s inability to remember his lines during rehearsals, adding an element of drama to the unfolding production, with reports in the press of on stage flubs during previews. Nichols even removed what many considered to be a pivotal scene from Act I, only to restore it before opening night to the satisfaction of the purists.

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Adding Machine

Joshua Schmidt’s haunting musical adaptation of Elmer Rice’s Expressionist tragedy the “Adding Machine,” currently playing downtown at the Minetta Lane Theatre, is a stunning artistic achievement. Directed by David Cromer with daring style the brilliantly conceived production is simply shattering. While the moody chamber piece may not be for the masses, Cromer’s original staging of the dark tale is nonetheless a bracing heartbreaker that remains true to the source material, while courageously avoiding commercial conceits.

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Cry Baby

After Mel Brooks, could John Waters, the self styled auteur of trash be far behind? Encouraged by the mega success of the Broadway production of “Hairspray,” John Waters has consented to this campy multi-million dollar musical adaptation of his 1990 film “Cry Baby” that starred a quirky Johnny Depp.

 

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Xanadu

Who would have thought a 1980 big budget movie musical turkey starring Olivia Newton-John would be reincarnated on Broadway as an absurdly silly send up of itself.

The jukebox musical Xanadu is the first show of the new Broadway season and from the looks of things may be just what the doctor ordered, “Inspired magic to heal what ails you.” This deft spoof at the Helen Hayes Theatre has audiences roaring with delight at the preposterous shenanigans from the top notch ensemble.

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Young Frankenstein

The new Mel Brooks musical Young Frankenstein,” based on his classic film, opened on Broadway with strong word of mouth from Seattle, indicating Mr. Brooks was poised to top his mega smash hit The Producers. With a reported excess of $30 million in advance ticket sales the splashy new musical is already a success and nothing anyone might say will ultimately matter much, but here we go, Young Frankenstein is a big bloated monster of a show, an over amplified extravaganza, dazzling in every detail, but missing the charm of the original film upon which it was based.

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“The American Dream” “The Sandbox”

As part of Edward Albee’s ongoing 80th birthday celebration the playwright has directed two of his early one act plays, “The American Dream” and “The Sandbox” at the venerable Cherry Lane Theatre. The satires of American values, intended as a homage to the French absurdist Eugene Ionesco, were written almost 50 years ago as an assault on middle class values, but today remain startlingly fresh and even contemporary.

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Next To Normal

A musical that really goes to unexpected places, that’s NEXT TO NORMAL. Yes that’s the name of the show. Actually it’s about bipolar disease, the darkest side of the mind and the dark ways in which we perceive it and treat it. Not a predictable or even plausible subject for a musical. But as it unfolds here in an uncanny, sensitive book by Brian Yorkey, the story is suspenseful and provocative.

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Grace

MCC Theater is presenting “Grace,” an acclaimed hit at London’s Soho Theater, now making its American premiere with Lynn Redgrave reprising her starring role. The distinguished actor is a commanding presence as the title character, a British professor of science, who calls herself a “naturalist” and has little need for God; considering the belief in a higher power or divine being to be “bollocks, complete and utter bollocks!”

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