I’ll Eat You Last

Jodi Stevens Headlines as Sue Mengers in John Logan’s I’ll East You Last at Music Theatre of Connecticut

By: Ellis Nassour

John Logan’s biting, sometimes brutal eavesdrop into an evening at the home of Hollywood’s pioneering first female mega agent, I’ll Eat You Last: A Chat with Sue Mengers, will star Jodi Stevens as the much-feared and, at least to a coterie of, much-loved powerbroker. It runs February 24-March 5 at Norwalk’s Music Theatre of Connecticut (MTC) (509 Westport Avenue), celebrating its 30th Anniversary season.

Jodi Stevens Headlines as Sue Mengers in John Logan’s I’ll Eat You Last at Music Theatre of Connecticut

By: Ellis Nassour

John Logan’s biting, sometimes brutal eavesdrop into an evening at the home of Hollywood’s pioneering first female mega agent, I’ll Eat You Last: A Chat with Sue Mengers, will star Jodi Stevens as the much-feared and, at least to a coterie of, much-loved powerbroker. It runs February 24-March 5 at Norwalk’s Music Theatre of Connecticut (MTC) (509 Westport Avenue), celebrating its 30th Anniversary season.

The show plays in the state-of-the-art 110-seat Main Stage theatre, which boasts it’s “Connecticut’s most intimate theatre setting.”

Stevens starred on Broadway in Urban Cowboy and Jekyll and Hyde. Off-Broadway and regional credits include Annie, Dracula: The Musical, Hairspray, Legally Blonde, Sweeney Todd, and opposite husband Scott Bryce, My Way and Love Letters at MTC and White Heron Theatre. She’s portrayed Marlene Dietrich in three productions: Noel Coward and Friends, the premiere of Barry Manilow’s Harmony, and Dietrich and Chevalier.

Mengers had a meteoric rise in Hollywood, rising quickly from agency secretary to powerful, revengeful, tart-tongued, and witheringly acidic agent in a then-male dominated field. In her early life, in Nazi Germany, she was kicked to the curb as “a chubby Jewish girl.” She escaped, arriving in New York in the mid-50s. She learned English watching movies. All those films had her in a constant dreamscape about Hollywood. During the run of Funny Girl, she met and became friends with Streisand. When Streisand went to Hollywood, Mengers followed.

In I’ll Eat You Last, with Hollywood changing and clients deserting her, Mengers awaits her A-list dinner guest with a cigarette in one hand, a joint in the other. She sits forlornly in her glamorous Beverly Hills home hoping for a call from Streisand, who’s just fired her. In the long wait, she dishes hot gossip and dirty secrets.

Mengers never brushed off the rough edges, but that didn’t stop her from ruling regally over Hollywood. Her clients were the Who’s Who of tinseltown: Beatty, Cher, Dunaway, Anjelica Huston, Ali MacGraw, Nicholson, Burt Reynolds, and assorted moguls and movers and shakers from M-G-M to San Quentin. Every guest had to be famous.

In Logan’s play, Stevens, channeling mean Mengers, says “Honey, my own mother couldn’t get in here if she was standing outside in the rain!”

In a 60 Minutes interview, Mengers told Mike Wallace, “I was a little fish — a little nothing making a hundred and thirty-five dollars a week. I liked the way the agents lived: the expense accounts, the cars. I thought, ‘What they do isn’t that hard. It beats typing.'”

When she rose to agent, mentored by one of the firm’s top honchnos, she lifted his Rolodex and left for greener pastures. She took on the big boys, landing clients by threats, deception, cajoling, promises, guilt, and doggedness. She was once described as “a bulldog with charm.”

Mengers, who suffered chronic illnesses and, in the end, tiny strokes, passed in 2011 at age 79.

Jodi Stevens is a three-time Connecticut Critics Circle nominee – including for Featured Actress in MTC’s Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike.

Logan is a three-time Oscar-nominated screenwriter and playwright. Plays include Red, winner of six Tonys including Best Play; screenplays include Skyfall, Sweeney Todd, The Aviator, and Gladiator. TV credits include Sex and the City.

Kevin Connors, MTC’s co-founder and executive artistic director, directs.

MTC is recipient of the Connecticut Critics’ Circle’s highest honor, the Tom Killen Memorial Award for Outstanding Contribution to Connecticut Professional Theatre. Its 30th Anniversary season is supported in part by Connecticut’s Department of Economic and Community Development and The Hour/Hearst Connecticut Media Group.

Tickets for I’ll Eat You Last: A Chat with Sue Mengers are $30-$55 and available online at www.musictheatreofct.com or by phone at (203) 454-3883.

Protest Songs *****

Classic Protest Songs: Second Edition
By: Paulanne Simmons

When many of us think of protest songs, we picture Bob Dylan, Joan Baez or Phil Ochs strumming guitars and singing at marches, cafes and concert halls. But as Scott Siegel showed in his Classic Protest Songs: Second Edition at Metropolitan Room on Friday, Feb. 10, the history is much richer.

Classic Protest Songs: Second Edition
By: Paulanne Simmons

When many of us think of protest songs, we picture Bob Dylan, Joan Baez or Phil Ochs strumming guitars and singing at marches, cafes and concert halls. But as Scott Siegel showed in his Classic Protest Songs: Second Edition at Metropolitan Room on Friday, Feb. 10, the history is much richer.

Of course the evening did include a few of the classic protest songs of the 60s. Alex Getlin san Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are A-Changin’” and Laila Robbins sang Crosby, Stills & Nash’s “Woodstock.” But there was also a fair sampling of much older songs. Jillian Louis sang Woody Guthrie’s 1940 “This Land is Your Land,” with the original, more controversial lyrics and Sal Viviano sang Yip Harburg and Jay Gorney’s Depression era “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?”

Siegel’s definition of protest songs is rather broad, including a good number of what we might call “inspirational” songs. Here Broadway had a major presence. Walker Jones sang “You’ve Got to be Carefully Taught” from Rodgers and Hammerstein’s South Pacific and Pepe Nufrio sang “You’ll Never Walk Alone” from the songwriting team’s “Carousel.”

The evening ended, most appropriately, with Pepe Nufrio and the Broadway By the Year Chorus rendering a powerful interpretation of “Do You Hear the People Sing” from Claude-Michel Schonberg and Alain Boublil’s Les Misérables.

Given the state of politics in the U.S. at this time, it’s not surprising that many of the songs were extremely heartfelt. Louis’s “This Land Is Your Land” including feisty audience participation. An American flag was unfurled at the end of “Do You Hear the People Sing.”

Perhaps Siegel really has it right. Protest songs and inspirational songs work hand-in-hand. Without hope their can be no resistance, and without resistance there is little hope.

Entrance Applause

By: Paulanne Simmons 

The theater is hushed. The house lights go off. Hugh Jackman walks onstage and the audience bursts into riotous applause

By: Paulanne Simmons 

The theater is hushed. The house lights go off. Hugh Jackman walks onstage and the audience bursts into riotous applause

Why? Jackman, as talented as he may be, has as yet done nothing to merit such acclaim. So it’s only reasonable to assume the audience is clapping for one (perhaps both) of two reasons. Jackman’s fans are showing the actor how much they appreciate him or how much they are anticipating his performance.

Either way, this is detrimental to the show. When the actor walks onstage in a play, that actor is not Hugh Jackman or Patti LuPone or James Earl Jones. The actor is the character he or she is play. Applause destroys this illusion and takes both the audience and the actor out of the place they should be to best interpret the playwright’s words.

What’s more, one can only imagine how the other, lesser known actors must feel when they walk onstage, unrecognized and unheralded. These hard-working men and women become second-class citizens in a play they have worked so hard to bring to life.

But perhaps the worst aspect of entrance applause is that it is part of the cult of the star, which is currently doing so much to ruin good theater. 

One suspects people applaud when a famous actor walks onstage mostly to acknowledge that they are savvy enough to recognize this esteemed personage. Even before entering the theater, they have read the right magazines, perused the most important reviews and seen the biggest shows. This applause may serve more to gratify their own egos than to please the actor.

It would be nice if people chose shows they would like to see on the basis of other factors as well: the subject matter, the playwright, the director. This would do much to insure that producers would think twice before putting their money behind a shoddy production, with the cynical hope that it will succeed because a big movie star is taking the lead.

But if people are not interested in any of the above, let them at least keep quiet and not disturb those in the audience who have come to the theater to see a play and not a star.

Tulla Booth Gallery

  Tulla Booth Gallery Presents
 Winter to Spring Photography Exhibit
 Opening Reception Saturday, February 10th  5 – 7 pm

                Exhibit: thru April  10, 2018
Artists: Stephen Wilkes, Daniel Jones, Roberto Dutesco, Blair Seagram

  Tulla Booth Gallery Presents
 Winter to Spring Photography Exhibit
 Opening Reception Saturday, February 10th  5 – 7 pm

                Exhibit: thru April  10, 2018
Artists: Stephen Wilkes, Daniel Jones, Roberto Dutesco, Blair Seagram

Daniel Jones his newest body of work, the Seaside Expressions series is almost painterly and it creates a visual moment that pulls the viewer in. His work taken with a digital camera the motion one sees is done entirely in the camera. The stunning color is all true to nature, altered only by the atmosphere created by the weather, light and in camera movment. This body of work, a new beginning, for Dan has been widely admired by our collectors and fans in the gallery

 Blair Seagram. “When my lens turned toward surfers I was inspired by their keen sense of timing catching a wave then riding across it. The sequence of images that make up the surfing panoramas is less about a decisive moment than about a series of moments or continuity of actions that are presented as one still image.” -Blair Seagram

Stephen Wilkes’s wildly popular “Day to Night” Series are exciting images of the most beloved cities and sites of the world. As part of his on going series he wanted to capture the iconic Santa Monica Pier in Los Angeles which he felt captures the essence of Southern California. Wilkes photographs from a stationary 50 foot crane. All explaned on a “CBS Sunday Morning” segment Shooting 12 hours from day to night and gathering 1,200 to 1,500 images To form one image from dawn to dusk. He was recently featured in newest National Geographic Issue celebrating the 100th anniversary of the State Parks in America. He is on a quest to complete his vision photographing for an upcoming a fine art publication. Please see Stephen recent lecture on Ted Talks. 

 Newest Work  “Brooklyn Bridge” A new view of the park under the Bridge on the shores of Dumbo in Brooklyn.

 The Tulla Booth Gallery features established and emerging  contemporary photographers. We offer authentic and beautiful photography in black and white and color.  We feature photographs in the following subjects: landscapes, seascapes, flora, exotic travel, figurative lifestyle, celebrity, and documentary. It is our goal to present iconic images that transcend their subject making them timeless and collectable.

We offer an “Art on Site,” art consulting service for home or office. House calls are great for the client and it gives us a scope of the client’s need as they build a collection of art they love.

Fall Gallery Hours: Thursday thru Sunday 12:30 – 6:00 Or Call for an Appointment 917-488-1229

Sunset Boulevard

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s masterpiece, Sunset Boulevard celebrates an historic return to Broadway at The Palace Theatre on February 9th

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s masterpiece, Sunset Boulevard celebrates an historic return to Broadway at The Palace Theatre on February 9th.

Three-time Tony Award-winner Glenn Close and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Tony Award-winning Best Musical, Sunset Boulevard return to Broadway in this new production. Close made her West End debut in bravura sold-out limited engagement at the English National Opera (ENO) in April 2016, winning an Evening Standard Award for her iconic portrayal of Norma Desmond. Based on Billy Wilder’s classic Academy Award-winning film, Sunset Boulevard features a celebrated book and lyrics by Don Black and Christopher Hampton.) Directed by Lonny Price, this production of Sunset Boulevard will feature a 40-piece orchestra on the stage of The Palace Theatre (1564 7th Avenue), the biggest on Broadway in more than 80 years.

With the Broadway opening of Sunset Boulevard, Andrew Lloyd Webber will have the rare distinction of having four musicals running simultaneously on Broadway: The Phantom of the Opera, School of Rock – The Musical, CATS, and Sunset Boulevard – an accomplishment only achieved previously by Rodgers and Hammerstein.

THE HISTORIC OPENING NIGHT WILL TAKE PLACE AT BROADWAY’S PALACE THEATRE with expected  first-nighters, including Bobby Cannavale, Al RokerJane KrakowskiCyndi LauperRosie O’DonnellJoel GreyMariska HargitayNeil Patrick HarrisPaul SchafferGabriel ByrneTituss BurgessBob BalabanKelli O’HaraPatina MillerLaura OsnesLena HallSierra BoggessLillias WhiteRosanna Scotto, and more to help  celebrate the historic opening night of Sunset Boulevard with cast members, including Glenn CloseMichael XavierSiobhan Dillon, and Fred Johanson, and the creative team: legendary composer Andrew Lloyd WebberDon Black (Book & Lyrics), Christopher Hampton (Book and Lyrics), and Lonny Price (Director).

 

Westminster Dog Show

The 141st Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is a prestigious all-breed conformation show that has been held in New York City annually since 1877. Currently, the breed and Junior Showmanship competitions are being held at Piers 92 and 94, while the group and Best in Show competitions are held at Madison Square Garden.

The 141st Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is a prestigious all-breed conformation show that has been held in New York City annually since 1877. Currently, the breed and Junior Showmanship competitions are being held at Piers 92 and 94, while the group and Best in Show competitions are held at Madison Square Garden.

Meet & Compete Featuring the 4th Masters Agility Championship & 8th AKC Meet The Breeds
Saturday, February 11, 2017
Daytime Session

4th Masters Agility Championship (8 am – 4 pm)
8th AKC Meet The Breeds (10 am – 5 pm)
Evening Session

Masters Agility Championship Finals (7 pm – 9 pm)
* Daytime session will take place at Piers 92/94 and evening session will take place at Pier 94 (711 12th Ave. at 55th St. & West Side Highway).

2nd Masters Obedience Championship
Monday, February 13, 2017
Daytime Session (8 am – 4 pm)

* Event will take place at Pier 94 (711 12th Ave. at 55th St. & West Side Highway).
141st WKC Dog Show
Monday, February 13, 2017
Daytime Session (8 am – 4 pm)

Breed Judging across Hound, Toy, Non-Sporting and Herding groups
Junior Showmanship preliminaries
Evening Session (6 pm – 11 pm)
Doors open at 6 pm for Best of Breed benching area

Group Judging across Hound, Toy, Non-Sporting and Herding groups (begins at 8 pm)
Tuesday, February 14, 2017
Daytime Session (8 am – 4 pm)

Breed Judging across Sporting, Working and Terrier groups
Junior Showmanship preliminaries
Evening Session (6 pm – 11 pm)
Doors open at 6 pm for Best of Breed benching area

Junior Showmanship Finals (begins at 7:30 pm)
Group Judging across Sporting, Working and Terrier groups (begins at 8:00 pm)
BEST IN SHOW!
* Daytime Sessions will take place at The Piers 92/94 (711 12th Ave. at 55th St. & West Side Highway).
* Evening Sessions will take place at Madison Square Garden (West 33rd St. & 7th Ave)
* All time EST

Photo: Barry Gordin

Broadway Update

Broadway Update: Theatre Responds to Trump
By: David Sheward

Donald Trump has only been President two weeks, but theater is already responding to his controversial (to put it mildly) regime.

Broadway Update: Theatre Responds to Trump
By: David Sheward

Donald Trump has only been President two weeks, but theater is already responding to his controversial (to put it mildly) regime. Many have compared Donald and his spokespeople Kellyanne Conway and Sean Spicer’s offering “Alternative facts” as truth to the doublespeak of the tyrannical dictator Big Brother in George Orwell’s classic dystopian novel 1984 which is enjoyed a resurgence lately (I wonder why.) A stage version of Orwell’s classic will be presented on Broadway in a limited production, opening on June 22 at the Hudson Theatre, now home to the also limited engagement of Sunday in the Park with George (more on that production and its decision to stay out of the Tony race in a future blog.) This British production of 1984, originally presented by the Headlong and Almeida will arrive with an American cast under the auspices of producers Sonia Freedman and Scott Rudin. A previous stage version played the Joyce Theater Off-Broadway in the 1990s as part of a regional American theater festival. There have been two movie adaptations. Edmond O’Brien, Jan Sterling and Michael Redgrave starred in the 1956 version and John Hurt (who just passed away) and Richard Burton headlined an even starker edition released in year of the title. With claims of fake news and imaginary terrorist attacks coming from the Trump administration, Orwell’s prophetic work is more relevant than ever.

John Hurt in the film version of 1984

Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award winning playwright Robert Schenkkan (The Kentucky Cycle, All the Way, Hacksaw Ridge) has written a more direct response to the Trumpian junta with Building the Wall, a new play set in near future. The playwright told the New York Times he churned out the script in a “white hot fury” over the course of a single week just prior to the election of 2016. It received a developmental reading at NYC’s Lark Theater shortly after its was finished and is now on the roster of four regional theaters. The first production will be at the Fountain Theatre in Los Angeles from March 18–May 21. The press release describes the play thus: “It’s the very near future, and the Trump administration has carried out his campaign promise to round up and detain millions of immigrants. Now, a writer interviews the supervisor of a private prison as he awaits sentencing for carrying out the federal policy that has escalated into the unimaginable. This riveting, harrowing and illuminating drama delivers a powerful warning and puts a human face on the inhuman, revealing how when personal accountability is denied, what seems inconceivable becomes inevitable.”

Other productions will be presented at the Curious Theatre in Denver (April 4-19), the Forum Theatre in Silver Spring, MD; the Borderlands Theatre in Tuscon, AZ; and the Adobe Rose Theatre, Santa Fe, NM. Hopefully, New York audiences will get to sample this relevant work.

Wallace Shawn’s Evening at the Talk House, opening Feb. 16 Off-Broadway in a New Group production at the Signature Theatre, also takes place in an alternative future. The plot concerns a group of theater artists reacting to a tyrannical leader in the White House. Lynn Nottage’s Sweat will transfer to Broadway in April after a hit run at the Public and is based on interviews with blue-collar workers displaced by the global economy.
Another Pulitzer Prize winner, Ayad Akhtar (Disgraced) tackles another aspect of the American system with Junk, a new play chronicling the financial civil war of the 1980s. It opens Oct. 12 at Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theatre for a limited run. Business-centered plays usually don’t do well on Broadway. Lucy Prebble’s Enron and Caryl Churchill’s Serious Money both closed after only a week of performances, but Junk is a LCT non-profit (ironic, huh, since it’s about making money).

As usual, here is an updated rundown of upcoming Broadway and Off-Broadway openings for the remainder of the 2016-17 season and beyond:

Feb. 9–Sunset Boulevard (Palace)
Feb. 15–Man from Nebraska (Second Stage)
Feb. 16–Evening at the Talk House (New Group/Signature Theatre)
Feb. 21–Everybody (Signature)
Feb. 22–If I Forget (Roundabout/Laura Pels)
Feb. 22–Kid Victory (Vineyard)
Feb. 23–Sunday in the Park with George (Hudson)
Feb. 23–Linda (MTC/City Center)
Feb. 27–The Penitent (Atlantic Theatre Co.)
Feb. 27–Wakey Wakey (Signature)
March 1–Sweeney Todd (Barrow Street)
March 1–All the Fine Boys (New Group/Signature)
March 2–Significant Other (Booth)
March 9–The Glass Menagerie (Golden)
March 12–Come from Away (Schoenfeld)
March 13–The Light Years (Playwrights Horizons)
March 15–Joan of Arc: Into the Fire (Public)
March 16–The Price (Roundabout/AA)
March 20–How to Transcend a Happy Marriage (LCT/Mitzi Newhouse)
March 23–Miss Saigon (Broadway)
March 26–Sweat (Studio 54)
March 26–Come Back, Little Sheba/Picnic (Transport Group/The Gym at Judson)
April 2–The Play That Goes Wrong (Lyceum)
April 3–Amelie (Walter Kerr)
April 5–Present Laughter (St. James)
April 5–Gently Down the Stream (Public)
April 6–War Paint (Nederlander)
April 13–Oslo (LCT/Vivian Beaumont)
April 17–Groundhog Day (August Wilson)
April 18–Indecent (Cort)
April 19–The Little Foxes (MTC/Friedman)
April 20–Hello, Dolly! (Shubert)
April 23–Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Lunt-Fontanne)
April 24–Anastasia (Broadhurst)
April 25–Six Degrees of Separation (Barrymore)
April 26–The Bandstand (Bernard Jacobs)
April 26–Pacific Overtures (CSC)
April 27–A Doll’s House, Part 2 (Golden)
2016-17 (Dates TBA)–The SpongeBob Musical, The Wiz, Camp David, Photograph 51
Spring 2017–Half Time
June 22–1984 (Hudson)
June 29–Marvin’s Room (Roundabout/AA)
Aug. 24–Prince of Broadway (MTC/Samuel J. Friedman)
Oct 12–Junk (LCT/Vivian Beaumont)
Oct. 26–M. Butterfly (Theater TBA)
2017–Sherlock Holmes, Singin’ in the Rain, Pat Benatar Musical
2017-18–Burn This, To Kill a Mockingbird
March 1, 2018–Amy and the Orphans (Laura Pels/Roundabout)
Spring 2018–Frozen (St. James), The Flamingo Kid
Future–The Cher Show, The Devil Wears Prada

2016-17 Broadway Season

 

New Plays
A Doll’s House, Part 2
The Encounter
Heisenberg
Indecent
Oslo
The Play That Goes Wrong
The Present
Significant Other
Sweat 

New Musicals
Amelie
Anastasia
The Bandstand
A Bronx Tale
Come From Away
Dear Evan Hansen
Groundhog Day
Half-Time
Holiday Inn, the New Irving Berlin Musical
In Transit
Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812
War Paint
 
Play Revivals
The Cherry Orchard
The Front Page
The Glass Menagerie
Jitney
Les Liaisons Dangereuses
The Little Foxes
Present Laughter
The Price
Six Degrees of Separation
 
Musical Revivals
Cats
Hello, Dolly!
Falsettos
Miss Saigon
Motown the Musical
Sunday in the Park with George
Sunset Boulevard
 
Special Attractions
Alton Brown Live: Eat Your Science
Black to the Future
Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons on Broadway!
The Illusionists: Turn of the Century
Kristin Chenoweth: My Love Letter to Broadway
 

The Liar **** – Yen **** – Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812 ***1/2

By: David Sheward
Could there be a more appropriate historical moment to mount a new adaptation of Corneille’s comedy The Liar? As our newly-elected president and his spokespeople substitute “alternative facts” for truth, Classic Stage Company presents David Ives’ intricate semi-updating of the hilarious tale of Dorante, an epic braggart exaggerating and fabricating his way through romantic entanglements in 17th century Paris. He’s accurately described as “a lying genius, if a moral zero” (sound familiar?) This is Ives’ third foray into refashioning French theatrical meringues. He has previously adapted Moliere’s The Misanthrope (as The School for Lies) and Regnard’s The Heir Apparent, both of which have played CSC.

By: David Sheward

Could there be a more appropriate historical moment to mount a new adaptation of Corneille’s comedy The Liar? As our newly-elected president and his spokespeople substitute “alternative facts” for truth, Classic Stage Company presents David Ives’ intricate semi-updating of the hilarious tale of Dorante, an epic braggart exaggerating and fabricating his way through romantic entanglements in 17th century Paris. He’s accurately described as “a lying genius, if a moral zero” (sound familiar?) This is Ives’ third foray into refashioning French theatrical meringues. He has previously adapted Moliere’s The Misanthrope (as The School for Lies) and Regnard’s The Heir Apparent, both of which have played CSC.

This latest fluffy dessert is delicious and full of lighter-than-air rhymes. Did I mention the script is all in verse? The catchier ones include “experience” and “Presbyeterians”; “moister” and “oyster”; and “bivalve” and “my valve.” There are a sprinkling of anachronisms but they do not distract. Michael Kahn who commissioned the new version for the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, DC where he is artistic director, maintains a light-footed pacing throughout.

Though Dorante is the title character and Christian Conn makes him a dashing rogue, the real star of the evening is Carson Elrod as Dorante’s sad-sack servant Cliton. While his master cannot tell the truth, Cliton suffers from the opposite malady—he finds it impossible to lie. (Add an “n” to his name and you get another victim of a huge prevaricator, adding a layer to the relevant political subtext.) Elrod is a masterful clown, expertly prattling and mugging, but never going over the top. The highlight of the show is a lesson in falsifying by Dorante to his honest-to-a-fault valet. As Conn elegantly demonstrates the necessary gestures and looks to lend verisimilitude to whoppers, Elrod gives Cliton’s awkward attempts to be appear smooth a riotous reality. Then the servant tries out his new fibbing skills on Isabelle (Kelly Hutchinson), the pretty maid he’s been after and receives a slap for his pains.

Hutchinson comes in a close second behind Elrod in the comic sweepstakes. She has a slight advantage over her fellow players since she plays not only the flirtatious Isabelle, but her twin sister the scolding sadomasochist Sabine. Also worthy of mention are Adam Lefevre as Dorante’s befuddled father and Ismenia Mendes and Amelia Pedlow as the two young ladies caught in the hero’s lies.   

At the other end of the theatrical spectrum, British playwright Anna Jordan’s Yen offers a searing, sordid portrait of alienated youth in a ripping production by Trip Cullman from the MCC Theatre. At first glance, this piercing drama seems like a great many other works about lost boys behaving badly such Orphans, This Is Our Youth, and Saved. In Mark Wendland’s spare box set with peeling wall paper and drab lighting (designed with appropriate moodiness by Ben Stanton), we find teenager half-brothers Hench and Bobbie watching porn and playing video games while their alcoholic, diabetic mother Maggie drops in occasionally for cigarettes, money, and food. The kids’ only regular companion is their German shepherd Taliban (so called because “He’s vicious and he’s brown,” Bobbie explains.) Into this dysfunctional melange comes neighbor Jennifer who at first only wants to care for the neglected canine, but gradually takes on the role of girlfriend for Hench and mother to Bobbie. Predictably a misunderstanding leads to tragedy, but the writing is so realistic and the acting and direction so sharp, this familiar story still has a walloping impact.

Oscar nominee Lucas Hedges (Manchester by the Sea) and Stefania LaVie Owen (The Carrie Diaries) feelingly convey Hench and Jenny’s tentative attractions and damaged psyches. Ari Graynor is brilliantly brittle as the out-of-control Maggie. The uniquely named Justice Smith gives a stand-out performance as the feral Bobbie. Violently leaping around the stage one moment, barking like a dog the next, Smith captures Bobbie’s almost animal-like need for attention and his hair-triggger code switching from lonely child to violent aggressor.

In other stage adventures, I managed to catch up with the Broadway edition of Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812. I was scheduled to see Dave Malloy’s techno-pop-rock musical version of a slice of Tolstoy’s epic War and Peace when it opened last November, but star Josh Groban was out that night and the next available performance was not until recently. There have been three previous Off-Broadway incarnations in 2012 and 2013. When I attended the second of these at a site-specific tent called Kazino in the meatpacking district, director Rachel Chavkin’s immersive experience was so involving, I felt as if I were in the room with the characters. In transferring to the much larger Imperial Theater, set designer Mimi Lien has done her best to recreate the atmosphere of a Russian dinner club, but the experience is much less intimate. Maybe those seated on the stage feel close to the Rostovs, Bolkonskys, Kuragins, and Bezukhovs as they wrestle with passions and loyalties, but from the orchestra seats, I felt removed from their machinations. The musical’s delicate closing moments brought me to tears Off-Broadway, but here I just admired the stagecraft.

As Pierre, Groban exhibits a magnificent voice, but lacks the depth to fully inhabit  the role. Denee Benton’s Natasha is charming and bubbly yet when her liaison with Anatole is shattered, she fails to move us. Original cast members Lucas Steele as the caddish Anatole, Amber Gray as his licentious sister Helene, and Grace McLean as the overbearing aunt Marya have blown up their parts to fill to larger space. Only Brittan Ashford as Natasha’s cousin and confidante Sonya maintains the heartbreaking pathos she achieved Off-Broadway, particularly in her shattering solo. In this roundup, Off-Broadway scores the higher points while Broadway only has higher prices.

The Liar ****
Jan. 26—Feb. 26. Classic Stage Company, 136 E. 13th St., NYC. Tue—Thu, 7 pm; Fri—Sat, 8pm; Sat, Sun, 3pm. Running time: two hours including intermission. $60. 212-352-3101. www.ovationtix.com. Photo: Richard Termine

“The Liar”

Yen ****
Jan. 30—Feb. 19. MCC Theatre at the Lucille Lortel Theatre, 121 Christopher St., NYC. Tue—Thu, 7 pm; Fri, Sat, 8 pm; Sat, 2 pm; Sun, 3 pm. Running time: two hours and ten mins. including intermission. $49-$99. (866) 811-4111. www.ovationtix.com. Photo: Joan Marcus

Lucas Hedges, Ari Graynor, Justice Smith in “Yen”
Stefania LaVie Owen, Lucas Hedges in “Yen”

Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812 ***1/2
Opened Nov. 14 for an open run.  Imperial Theatre, 249 W. 45th St., NYC. Tue, Thu, 7pm; Wed, Fri—Sat, 8pm; Wed, Sat, 2 pm; Sun, 3 pm. Running time: two hours and 30 mins. including intermission. $59-$299. (212) 239-6200. www.telecharge.com. Photo: Chad Batka

Josh Groban in “Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812”
Denee Benton, Amber Gray in “Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812”

 

Georgie Opens at The Davenport

Ed Dixon recounts a 20- year friendship in the poignant and captivating tale, Georgie: My Adventures with George Rose.

Ed Dixon recounts a 20- year friendship in the poignant and captivating tale, Georgie: My Adventures with George Rose, which opened for a limited run through April 15, 2017

Mr. Dixon wrote and stars in the immensely entertaining new show, Georgie: My Adventures with George Rose directed by Eric Shaeffer. The evening chronicles his 20-year friendship with the Two-time Tony® Award-winning character actor George Rose, a bon-vivant with a flair for the dramatic, who appeared in The Mystery of Edwin Drood, My Fair Lady, and The Pirates of Penzance in an illustrious career on the stages of Broadway and London as well as in film.

Ed Dixon

Georgie premiered at The Signature Theatre in Arlington, Virginia, in January 2016 and will play a limited engagement through Saturday, April 15, 2017 at The Loft at The Davenport Theatre, 354 West 45th Street, between 8th & 9th Avenues.

Opening Night Photography Barry Gordin
@ Sardi’s  February 1, 2017

Len Cariou, Jamie deRoy, Lee Roy Reams
Kathie Lee Gifford, Ed Dixon, Mary Cossette
Kathie Lee Gifford, Tracy Mitchell
Tony Sheldon
Ed Dixon, Alan Onickel
Tracy Mitchell, Elisa Stein, Ricki Kane Larimer
Julia Murney
Kathie Lee Gifford, Ed Dixon
Ed Dixon, Ellis Nassour
Len Cariou, Ed Dixon, Charles Strouse
Ed Dixon

 

The Present *****

By: Isa Goldberg
Is it a bomb? Will there be a postmortem?  Simply, questions people are asking about the The Present.

The Sydney Theatre Company makes its Broadway debut with this contemporary adaptation of Platonov, an early, unwieldy play, by Anton Chekhov. In its current incarnation, by Andrew Upton, directed by John Crowley, the setting (by Alice Babidge) is a contemporary country home in Russia, in a village that might as well be East Hampton, NY. To coin a Chekhovian joke, it’s a place everyone is dying to go to, but even at 110 miles from Manhattan, the trip is far too treacherous.

By: Isa Goldberg
Is it a bomb? Will there be a postmortem?  Simply, questions people are asking about the The Present.

The Sydney Theatre Company makes its Broadway debut with this contemporary adaptation of Platonov, an early, unwieldy play, by Anton Chekhov. In its current incarnation, by Andrew Upton, directed by John Crowley, the setting (by Alice Babidge) is a contemporary country home in Russia, in a village that might as well be East Hampton, NY. To coin a Chekhovian joke, it’s a place everyone is dying to go to, but even at 110 miles from Manhattan, the trip is far too treacherous.

While it stars the unimpeachable Cate Blanchett, it’s not the on-stage wattage that is so earth shattering, but something more akin to tonnage. Weighing in with fierce intensity and concentration, these actors toss their thunderbolts with the virtuosity of demigods and goddesses. Some of the characters seem to believe they are – far more than most mortals. And as the third act is staged amidst a sea of clouds, we do have to wonder.

At the center of it all, is Platonov, a schoolteacher, a womanizer, and a liar. Richard Roxburgh brings a surprising physical and psychological prowess to the role. And it’s a formidable one, as it’s he who drives the action into this fantastical terrain.

The story, a dinner hosted by “The General’s” widow Anna (Cate Blanchett) on the occasion of her 40th birthday, turns into a bloody disaster. Perhaps that is our hostess’s wish. It doesn’t matter. Reality is banished. Impulse prevails. Comedy reigns. And tragedy befalls.

Only a few of the characters benefit from this. Most importantly Yegor (David Downer), who runs off with the cherry orchard, or in this case, the lease to the mines. 

While we observe these prominent Chekhovian themes – the suppression of life, the destructive power of greed, the life of the mind – one is also aware of a multitude of contemporary influences. For one, Andrew Upton’s adaptation brings to mind the playful, albeit serious antics of Tom Stoppard’s The Real Thing. Costume and lighting designs by Alice Babidge and Nick Schlieper evoke David Hockney’s pop aesthetic.  And composer/sound designer Stefan Gregory sets up some dirty dancin’ with songs like Haddaway’s “What is Love”.

“The whole place is charged and ready to blow!” Blanchett’s Anna threatens, in a performance that is worth of more than a trophy.

The Present *****
Jan. 8—March 19. Sydney Theatre Company at the Ethel Barrymore Theater, 243 W. 47th St., NYC. Tue, Thu, 7 pm; Wed, Fri-Sat, 7:30 pm; Wed, Sat, 1:30

Broadway Update: “Butterfly” and “Prada”

Clive Owen will star in M. Butterfly on Broadway this fall
By: David Sheward

Clive Owen, last seen on Broadway in Harold Pinter’s Old Times, will return in a new production of David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly, directed by Julie Taymor in her first Broadway staging since being dismissed from Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. (Her interpretation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream played Off-Broadway.)

Clive Owen will star in M. Butterfly  on Broadway this fall
By: David Sheward

Clive Owen, last seen on Broadway in Harold Pinter’s Old Times, will return in a new production of David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly, directed by Julie Taymor in her first Broadway staging since being dismissed from Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. (Her interpretation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream played Off-Broadway.) M. Butterfly will open Oct. 26, 2017 at a theater to be announced. The original 1988 production made a star out of B.D. Wong as Song Liling, a Chinese opera singer engaged in an affair with a French diplomat played by John Lithgow. Based on a true story, the 20-year relationship shocked international circles when it was revealed Song was really a man. This new production will new include new material based on information about the case that has come to light since the original staging which won the Tony and Drama Desk Award for Best Play and ran for 777 performances (a rare long run for a non-musical).

Also in the works, but in a much earlier stage of development, is a musical version of The Devil Wears Prada, Lauren Weisenberger’s autobiographical novel about an assistant to a high-powered fashion magazine editor not unlike Vogue’s Anna Wintour. Sir Elton John, whose previous theatrical musical ventures include Aida, The Lion King and Billy Elliot, will write the music. Paul Rudnick (Jeffrey, I Hate Hamlet, Addams Family Values) will make his debut as a musical book-writer and lyricist. Meryl Streep, Anne Hathaway, and Emily Blunt starred in the 2000 film version.

Anne Hathaway, Meryl Streep and Emily Blunt in the film version on The Devil Wears Prada

Here is a rundown of upcoming Broadway and Off-Broadway openings for the remainder of the 2016-17 season and beyond:

Feb. 9–Sunset Boulevard (Palace)
Feb. 15–Man from Nebraska (Second Stage)
Feb. 16–Evening at the Talk House (New Group/Signature Theatre)
Feb. 21–Everybody (Signature)
Feb. 22–If I Forget (Roundabout/Laura Pels)
Feb. 22–Kid Victory (Vineyard)
Feb. 23–Sunday in the Park with George (Hudson)
Feb. 23–Linda (MTC/City Center)
Feb. 27–The Penitent (Atlantic Theatre Co.)
Feb. 27–Wakey Wakey (Signature)
March 1–Sweeney Todd (Barrow Street)
March 1–All the Fine Boys (New Group/Signature)
March 2–Significant Other (Booth)
March 9–The Glass Menagerie (Golden)
March 12–Come from Away (Schoenfeld)
March 13–The Light Years (Playwrights Horizons)
March 15–Joan of Arc: Into the Fire (Public)
March 16–The Price (Roundabout/AA)
March 20–How to Transcend a Happy Marriage (LCT/Mitzi Newhouse)
March 23–Miss Saigon (Broadway)
March 26–Sweat (Studio 54)
March 26–Come Back, Little Sheba/Picnic (Transport Group/The Gym at Judson)
April 2–The Play That Goes Wrong (Lyceum)
April 3–Amelie (Walter Kerr)
April 5–Present Laughter (St. James)
April 5–Gently Down the Stream (Public)
April 6–War Paint (Nederlander)
April 13–Oslo (LCT/Vivian Beaumont)
April 17–Groundhog Day (August Wilson)
April 18–Indecent (Cort)
April 19–The Little Foxes (MTC/Friedman)
April 20–Hello, Dolly! (Shubert)
April 23–Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Lunt-Fontanne)
April 24–Anastasia (Broadhurst)
April 25–Six Degrees of Separation (Barrymore)
April 26–The Bandstand (Bernard Jacobs)
April 27–A Doll’s House, Part 2 (Golden)
2016-17 (Dates TBA)–The SpongeBob Musical, The Wiz, Camp David, Photograph 51
Spring 2017–Half Time
June 29–Marvin’s Room (Roundabout/AA)
Aug. 24–Prince of Broadway (MTC/Samuel J. Friedman)
Oct. 26– M. Butterfly (Theater TBA)
2017– Sherlock Holmes, Singin’ in the Rain, Pat Benatar Musical
2017-18–Burn This, To Kill a Mockingbird
Spring 2018–Frozen (St. James), The Flamingo Kid
Future–The Cher Show, The Devil Wears Prada

2016-17 Broadway Season

New Plays

A Doll’s House, Part 2
The Encounter
Heisenberg
Indecent
Oslo
The Play That Goes Wrong
The Present
Significant Other
Sweat
New Musicals
Amelie
Anastasia
The Bandstand
A Bronx Tale
Come From Away
Dear Evan Hansen
Groundhog Day
Half-Time
Holiday Inn, the New Irving Berlin Musical
In Transit
Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812
War Paint
Play Revivals
The Cherry Orchard
The Front Page
The Glass Menagerie
Jitney
Les Liaisons Dangereuses
The Little Foxes
Present Laughter
The Price
Six Degrees of Separation
Musical Revivals
Cats
Hello, Dolly!
Falsettos
Miss Saigon
Motown the Musical
Sunday in the Park with George
Sunset Boulevard
Special Attractions
Alton Brown Live: Eat Your Science
Black to the Future
Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons on Broadway!
The Illusionists: Turn of the Century
Kristin Chenoweth: My Love Letter to Broadway

Oh Hello on Broadway

Originally Published on February 1, 2017 in The David Desk 2

Jitney ****1/2

By: Isa Goldberg

Director Ruben Santiago-Hudson’s revival of Jitney delivers a heartfelt optimism all within the harsh realism of August Wilson’s drama, about a group of African American men in the Hill District of Pittsburgh in 1977. This is Wilson’s well-known turf, after all, and he knows these characters with an almost innate intimacy, that this director shares.

By: Isa Goldberg

Director Ruben Santiago-Hudson’s revival of Jitney delivers a heartfelt optimism all within the harsh realism of August Wilson’s drama, about a group of African American men in the Hill District of Pittsburgh in 1977. This is Wilson’s well-known turf, after all, and he knows these characters with an almost innate intimacy, that this director shares.

Each is a study in how men cope with the racism that society perpetuates, and which also defines them. In the hands of this outstanding ensemble, we can appreciate how well drawn Wilson’s characters are. The remarkable John Douglas Thompson plays the owner of the rundown gypsy car service for which they all work. As a man who strives to live beyond his perceived chains, he takes no prisoners. His cohorts – an endearing drunk, Fielding, humorously played by Anthony Chisholm; a righteous, gossipy trouble maker, Turnbo, authoritatively played by Michael Potts; and a tough skinned youth, Youngblood, sensitively portrayed by Andre Holland. It’s he who says, “The past is over and done with. I’m just thinking about the future.”

The plot, however, turns around Philmore (Ray Anthony Thomas) who has just been released from a 20-year prison term. He’s Becker’s son – the greatest disappointment of his life, and a man he singularly renounces. Still, it is he who ultimately moves them all beyond their perceived fate.

What speaks to us most admirably in this, Wilson’s 8th drama in his Pittsburgh Cycle, is the need to debunk stereotypes. At the play’s opening, Turnbo and the more fair-minded Doub (the gifted Keith Randolph Smith), argue about whether or not Lena Horne is really pretty or if people just think she is, Turnbo insisting that the younger Sarah Vaughn is far greater. The conversation provokes an issue about public perception and self-perception. What controls our identity and who is in charge of it?

A similar question surrounds the men of the failing and soon to be outdated gypsy cars. Are they outcasts who will always be cut off from the mainstream of society, or men who can reach beyond the entrenched racism and xenophobia, which they experience. The answer, my friends, speaks for itself, in this very human and touching drama at The Manhattan Theatre Club.

Jitney ****1/2
Samuel J. Friedman Theatre
261 West 47th Street
For Tickets Click Here 

Kira Lee @ ACA Galleries

ACA Galleries presents Kira Lee’s first solo exhibition in New York, Legends & Lyrics, on view February 2nd through March 4th, 2017. The exhibition features over thirty new portraits of Rock & Roll’s most notable icons including: Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Jerry Garcia, and The Beatles

ACA Galleries presents Kira Lee’s first solo exhibition in New York, Legends & Lyrics, on view February 2nd through March 4th, 2017. The exhibition features over thirty new portraits of Rock & Roll’s most notable icons including: Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Jerry Garcia, and The Beatles. Lee’s unique typographic style uses detailed penmanship to produce curiously realistic renditions using the lyrics of their unforgettable songs. “It is not a concept I came up with overnight. The process of creating texture and grey scale from typography has been and still is evolving…. Using theories to outline horn-rimmed glasses; song lyrics twisted and turned into locks of hair; heart-aching poems carved into crow’s feet; culture-defining philosophies stitched into a silk robe.” – Kira Lee Kira Lee was born in Los Angeles and attended The Art Institute of California in San Diego from 2007 to 2009. Her art has been included in exhibitions in London, Miami, New York, Los Angeles and San Diego.

Kira Lee
David Bowie, 2015 Acrylic on canvas 84 x 48 in.
Kira Lee
Abby Road, 2016
Spray enamel with acrylic gel pen on canvas 36 x 48 in.

Lee_Legends_and_Lyrics_exhibition_preview_OPT.pdf

Photography: Barry Gordin Opening Night Feb 1, 2017

Vaughn Bergen, Kira Lee, Casey Bergen
Patrick Christiano, Mikaela Sardo Lamarche
Victor Cipolla, Kira Lee, Tripp Derrick Barnes, Abdur Rahman
Vaughn Bergen, Dorian Bergen

The Liar ***1/2

By: Isa Goldberg
The dictum “the unexamined life is not worth living”, is merely a set up for hilarious antics, or so it would appear, in David Ives’ The Liar, currently at the Classic Stage Company (CSC). In fact, at this performance, it behooves us to put any thought of morality aside. Unless it sort of tumbles out of the lampoon, it is hardly with our time.

By: Isa Goldberg
The dictum “the unexamined life is not worth living”, is merely a set up for hilarious antics, or so it would appear, in David Ives’ The Liar, currently at the Classic Stage Company (CSC). In fact, at this performance, it behooves us to put any thought of morality aside. Unless it sort of tumbles out of the lampoon, it is hardly with our time.

Speaking in iambic pentameter, Ives’ poesy unleashes some gems of slapstick dialogue. Here’s an instance, from the intro, “We’ve stowed our snacks, we’ve peed, we’ve sexted. Deep breath now, everyone, release all strain, And with those gadgets, please – turn off your brain.” The great classicist Corneille, would turn over in his grave!

Set in the Paris of 1643, an on-stage sign points us to the “Royal Place”. “Unless the Louvre has mouvred”, that reference must be to the Palais Royale, where one may shop for such antiquities as this comedy, Le Menteur by Pierre Corneille, which Ives has adapted. This is a farce more worthy of Moliere.

The action turns around the way the characters literally (and metaphorically) bump into each other. As Ives describes his play, it’s “the truth, as refracted in a theatrical fun house mirror”. Here, two men, Dorante (Christian Conn) and Alcippe (Tony Roach), friends from childhood, butt heads when they discover that they are both in love with the same princess, or so they imagine. Ismenia Mendes and Amelia Pedlow portray the fair maidens with the rhyming names Clarice and Lucrece. In a commanding comic turn, Kelly Hutchinson portrays both of their lady servants, Isabelle and Sabine – twins who are as different in their temperaments as Jekyll and Hyde.

Duplicity is entirely the matter at hand.  And Christian Conn is the gifted actor to whom the role of Dorante, the masterful liar, fits like a glove. His instructions include using natural gestures, speaking trippingly, and never telling the truth. As his sidekick, Cliton, the marvelous Carson Elrod plays his manservant as well as the jester, who perpetuates the tale. That seems to be the product of his malady – an uncontrollable fixation on spouting the truth.

It’s all steered with a wonderful sense of timing and farce by the Shakespearean director, Michael Kahn. Murell Horton’s take off on 17th costumes, and Adam Wernick’s cheerful evocation of its music, enhance the symmetry. Neither Alexander Dodge’s scenic design nor Mary Louise Geiger’s lighting are overdone. Happily, everything else is.

The Liar ***1/2
Classic Stage Company
136 East 13 Street
For Tickets Click Here

 

Scott Siegel Presents

ON SUPER SUNDAY – THE SUPERBOWL OF SINGING!
The Great Broadway Belt Show! Sunday, February 5 at 7 PM at Feinstein’s/54 Below

ON SUPER SUNDAY – THE SUPERBOWL OF SINGING!
The Great Broadway Belt Show! 
Sunday, February 5 at 7 PM at Feinstein’s/54 Below 

Broadway Show Tunes That Should be Belted…And the Broadway singers who can Belt Them!

There is nothing more thrilling on the Broadway stage than seeing a performer step forward and belt the beejeesus out of a great song.

Usually, however, there is only one — maybe two, if you’re lucky — of those moments in any one Broadway show. But not on this night at Feinstein’s/54 Below! You’re going to get a whole show of the greatest Broadway belting numbers from across the length and breadth of the Great White Way — and they’ll be performed for you by Broadway performers who have the chops to to sing them. This is a night to marvel at the power and the glory of the human voice, put to the test by the great belt numbers like “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going!” from Dreamgirls, “Defying Gravity” from Wicked, “Nobody’s Gonna Rain on My Parade” from Funny Girl.  You get the idea! And who will be belting all of these songs? Just the greatest male and female voices on Broadway!

The Great Broadway Belt Show is created for Feinstein’s/54 Below by New York impresario Scott Siegel. Scott is the creator/writer/director/host of Town Hall’s critically acclaimed signature series, Broadway by the Year, which starts its 17th season on February 27th. He has also produced, written, and directed Michael Feinstein, and has created more than 300 concert events that have been performed all over the world.

Featuring:

William Blake (Carnegie Hall)

Patrice Covington (The Color Purple)

Danielle Gimbal (The Kennedy Center)

Laurel Harris (In Transit)

Jillian Louis (Cheers: The Musical)

Natalie Toro (A Tale of Two Cities)

For Tickets Call: 646-476-3551

Also on Friday Feb 10 @ 7pm Scott Siegel Presents…MICHAEL CERVERIS & LAILA ROBINS in PROTEST SONGS – VOLUME 2 Classic Protest Songs That Speak To Today!

The sold-out audience for the Protest Song show on Inauguration Day clamored for another edition.

So, here it is: entirely different,and completely compelling, classic protest songs from the past will be performed by yet another all-star cast of Broadway and nightclub performers. Songs by Jacques Brel, Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Simon & Garfunkel, Flaherty & Arhens, Kander & Ebb and more! Once again produced, written, and hosted by NY impressario Scott Siegel, this show promises to be as emotionally potent as the original show on January 20th that brought the audience to its feet in a thunderous standing ovation. The power of music to move, motivate, and inspire will once again be on display as the great protest songs of the past point the way toward a better tomorrow.

 

Come join us and witness the past speak to the present and ultimately change the future!

Starring (so far):

MICHAEL CERVERIS (Tony Award Winner, Fun Home, Sweeney Todd, Assassins, etc.)

LAILA ROBINS (Homeland on TV, The Apple Plays at The Public Theater, etc.)

SAL VIVIANO (6 Broadway shows, concert and recording artist)

Featuring the Broadway by the Year Chorus

And more stars soon to be announced!

Sponsored, in part, by Margot Astrachan, Marge Manger, and The Arts Archive

Reserve Your Tickets at 212-206-0440
The Metropolitan Room: 34 West 22nd Street, NYC
$25 cover/$25 food & beverage min.